20

I'm playing around with the new ASP.NET Core and are currently creating a API that I want to call from a JavaScript frontend.

I want to use the mediator pattern to reduce the coupling, and I have found the Library MediatR from Jimmy Bogard.

My problem consist in wiring it up using the build in DI, I have tried looking at the examples, but can't see to crack how it binds into the ConfigureServices method in the startup class.

Do anybody have any insight?

UPDATE: I got it working, from my ConfigureService method:

services.AddScoped<SingleInstanceFactory>(p => t => p.GetRequiredService(t));

services.Scan(scan => scan
        .FromAssembliesOf(typeof(IMediator), typeof(MyHandler.Handler))
        .AddClasses()
        .AsImplementedInterfaces());
  • 1
    github.com/jbogard/MediatR/blob/master/samples/… Seems pretty simple to me, but for assembly scan you need this Scrutor package (ASP.NET Core's DI doesn't come with assembly scanning and there are no plans to ship it) – Tseng Feb 15 '16 at 12:59
  • How would you add that to the ConfigureService method? services.AddTransient(typeof (IMediator), BuildMediator().GetType()); – Nyegaard Feb 15 '16 at 13:32
  • 1
    You don't want to register it that way, Transient means that it will be created every time when the dependency is resolved. services.AddScoped<SingleInstanceFactory>(p => t => p.GetRequiredService(t)); and services.AddScoped<MultiInstanceFactory>(p => t => p.GetRequiredServices(t)); are factory methods that are injected into mediator and resolve the notifications (multi) or requests (single) – Tseng Feb 15 '16 at 15:02
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    The IMediator itself you can register as services.AddScoped<IMediator,Mediator>() as it has public constructor and the delegates are registered in previous step. In the example the last one is did automatically via Scrutor scanning – Tseng Feb 15 '16 at 15:09
  • @Tseng Does my own answer match how you would do it? – Nyegaard Feb 16 '16 at 7:38
37

As of July 2016, Jimmy Bogard, author of MediatR, has released a package to register MediatR, and Handlers, with the ASP.Net Core DI service (which is actually the interface IServiceCollection, implemented in Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection and which is not restricted to use solely within ASP.Net Core).

MediatR.Extensions.Microsoft.DependencyInjection

Link to GitHub Project.

Link to NuGet Package information.

A blog post introducing the package and it's capabilities can be found here

Example registration copied directly from the (very short) blog post:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
  services.AddMvc();

  services.AddMediatR(typeof(Startup));
}

This package performs several functions to enable MediatR, including the required scanning of assemblies for Handlers:

You can either pass in the assemblies where your handlers are, or you can pass in Type objects from assemblies where those handlers reside. The extension will add the IMediator interface to your services, all handlers, and the correct delegate factories to load up handlers. Then in your controller, you can just use an IMediator dependency:

public class HomeController : Controller
{
  private readonly IMediator _mediator;

  public HomeController(IMediator mediator)
  {
    _mediator = mediator;
  }
  public IActionResult Index()
  {
    var pong = _mediator.Send(new Ping {Value = "Ping"});
    return View(pong);
  }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    This should be the correct answer. Not only is it more elegant and simple, but it's the one recommended by the creator of Mediatr. – Reydel Leon Jan 17 '17 at 15:26
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    Well, it is StackOverflows policy that the 'correct answer' is the one chosen by the question asker that solves their particular issue - in their opinion. It is by upvoting that later answers, or more broadly useful answers, are drawn to people's attention. I do however wish people would stop answering their own questions within an hour, and actually give people a chance to answer. There are many incorrect, poor, or out of date answers with green ticks next to them; I advise people to read all answers and determine which is appropriate to them, and to pay attention to dates of posting. – dmcquiggin Jan 18 '17 at 16:11
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    Unfortunately that library only works if the Handlers are public classes. If for example are defined with the internal scope visibility it does'nt work – Lorenzo Jan 18 '18 at 11:12
  • Yes, perhaps you are the author of the GitHub issue regarding internal scoping that was created 16 hours ago on the GitHub repo. Jimmy Bogard, the author, is normally quite receptive to reasonable feature requests, and explains his design decision. Link to issue: github.com/jbogard/… – dmcquiggin Jan 18 '18 at 12:25
3

I got it working, my code:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
      services.AddScoped<SingleInstanceFactory>(p => t => p.GetRequiredService(t));
      services.AddScoped<MultiInstanceFactory>(p => t => p.GetRequiredServices(t));
      services.Scan(scan => scan
              .FromAssembliesOf(typeof(IMediator), typeof(MyHandlerOne.Handler))
              .FromAssembliesOf(typeof(IMediator), typeof(MyHandlerTwo.Handler))
             .AddClasses()
             .AsImplementedInterfaces());
}

and I have a class that implements the GetRequiredService that MultiInstanceFactory need:

public static class GetServices
{
    public static IEnumerable<object> GetRequiredServices(this IServiceProvider provider, Type serviceType)
    {
        return (IEnumerable<object>)provider.GetRequiredService(typeof(IEnumerable<>).MakeGenericType(serviceType));
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
1

There´s a good tutorial by https://dotnetcoretutorials.com/. This's the example code for the correct installation and configuration of MediatR.

Installing MediatR

The first thing we need to do is install the MediatR nuget package. So from your package manager console run :

Install-Package MediatR

We also need to install a package that allows us to use the inbuilt IOC container in .NET Core to our advantage (We’ll see more of that shortly). So also install the following package :

Install-Package MediatR.Extensions.Microsoft.DependencyInjection

Finally we open up our startup.cs file. In our ConfigureServices method, we need to add in a call to register all of MediatR’s dependencies.

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    services.AddMediatR(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly());
    //Other injected services. 
}

This is the link: https://dotnetcoretutorials.com/2019/04/30/the-mediator-pattern-part-3-mediatr-library/

I hope this helps.

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0

I created a DI helper for ASP.NET Core RC2 that you can add to your startup. It gives you basic convention based mapping so if you have a class like:

MyClass : IMyClass

It will map IMyClass in the IOC container which will make it available for injection.

I also added the Mappings for MediatR.

To use it Just add the class to your project and then in your startup.cs class add the lines you need to the ConfigureServices() method:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    //Other Code here......

    var ioc = new PearIoc(services);

    //ioc.AddTransient<IEmailSender, AuthMessageSender>();
    //ioc.AddTransient<ISmsSender, AuthMessageSender>();

    ioc.WithStandardConvention();
    ioc.WithMediatR();
    ioc.RunConfigurations();
}

I added the AddTransient() method just for convenience (you could also just use services.AddTransient()) but it also exposes the IServiceCollection in case you need to do more with it.

You can also extend it like I did with the .WithMediatR() extension and write your own custom mappings.

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