87

This question's answer needs an update, since browsers have changed


Original question

I've looked through several posts on StackOverflow, but haven't been able to find an answer to this rather simple question.

I have an HTML construct like this:

<table>
  <tr>
    <td class="thatSetsABackground">
      <div class="thatSetsABackgroundWithAnIcon">
        <dl>
          <dt>yada
          </dt>
          <dd>yada
          </dd>
        </dl>
      <div>
    </td>
    <td class="thatSetsABackground">
      <div class="thatSetsABackgroundWithAnIcon">
        <dl>
          <dt>yada
          </dt>
          <dd>yada
          </dd>
        </dl>
      <div>
    </td>
  </tr>
</table>

What I need is for the div to fill the height of the td, so I can be able to position the div's background (the icon) at the bottom-right corner of the td.

How do you suggest I go about that?

148

If you give your TD a height of 1px, then the child div would have a heighted parent to calculate it's % from. Because your contents would be larger then 1px, the td would automatically grow, as would the div. Kinda a garbage hack, but I bet it would work.

  • 7
    While it seems to work fine in webkit, IE9 completely breaks. – Daniel Imms Jul 12 '12 at 7:43
  • Work for me in IE11 only when I also set div to inline-block. Thanks! – Danny C Sep 24 '15 at 12:06
  • 2
    This doesn't seem to work in Firefox 45 – Wouter Apr 12 '16 at 14:00
  • 3
    Here's a solution that also works in Firefox: stackoverflow.com/questions/36575846/… – Wouter Apr 12 '16 at 14:43
  • To make it work in Firefox as well as in Chrome I had to use min-height: 1px; instead of height: 1px; – Matt Leonowicz Jun 6 at 7:02
31

CSS height: 100% only works if the element's parent has an explicitly defined height. For example, this would work as expected:

td {
    height: 200px;
}

td div {
    /* div will now take up full 200px of parent's height */
    height: 100%;
}

Since it seems like your <td> is going to be variable height, what if you added the bottom right icon with an absolutely positioned image like so:

.thatSetsABackgroundWithAnIcon {
    /* Makes the <div> a coordinate map for the icon */
    position: relative;

    /* Takes the full height of its parent <td>.  For this to work, the <td>
       must have an explicit height set. */
    height: 100%;
}

.thatSetsABackgroundWithAnIcon .theIcon {        
    position: absolute;
    bottom: 0;
    right: 0;
}

With the table cell markup like so:

<td class="thatSetsABackground">  
  <div class="thatSetsABackgroundWithAnIcon">    
    <dl>
      <dt>yada
      </dt>
      <dd>yada
      </dd>
    </dl>
    <img class="theIcon" src="foo-icon.png" alt="foo!"/>
  </div>
</td>

Edit: using jQuery to set div's height

If you keep the <div> as a child of the <td>, this snippet of jQuery will properly set its height:

// Loop through all the div.thatSetsABackgroundWithAnIcon on your page
$('div.thatSetsABackgroundWithAnIcon').each(function(){
    var $div = $(this);

    // Set the div's height to its parent td's height
    $div.height($div.closest('td').height());
});
  • 2
    I didn't really work all that well, and we've decided on different approach. But I'll accept your answer since it's the best one around. – CodeMonkey Sep 15 '10 at 17:36
  • 3
    Hah, if only I had a dollar for the number of times CSS has made me change my approach :) – Pat Sep 15 '10 at 17:43
  • 5
    Am I the only one who thinks that "CSS height: 100% only works if the element's parent has an explicitly defined height" is a really dumb rule? The browser determines the parent element's height anyway; there's no way you should have to explicitly set the parent element's height. – Jez Nov 26 '12 at 17:47
  • 1
    @Radek good point - I've updated my answer to address this. – Pat Mar 18 '13 at 18:53
  • 1
    the jquery solution worked though only when I placed it at the end of the file, thanks – luke_mclachlan Jan 16 '16 at 20:15
5

You could try making your div float:

.thatSetsABackgroundWithAnIcon{

    float:left;
}

Alternativelly, use inline-block:

.thatSetsABackgroundWithAnIcon{

    display:inline-block;
}

Working example of the inline-block method:

table,
th,
td {
  border: 1px solid black;
}
<table>
  <tr>
    <td>
      <div style="border:1px solid red; height:100%; display:inline-block;">
        I want cell to be the full height
      </div>
    </td>
    <td>
      This cell
      <br/>is higher
      <br/>than the
      <br/>first one
    </td>
  </tr>
</table>

  • 3
    display:inline-block; works great ! Thx for the hint ! – Gabriel Lupu Aug 30 '13 at 13:25
  • The float:left suggestion doesn't seem to work. This answer could be improved by removing it, since the second solution mentioned seems to work. – Wouter Apr 12 '16 at 12:17
  • 1
    It doesn't with Firefox. It seems only to work with Chrome. – YLombardi Apr 27 '16 at 10:00
  • 5
    That snippet doesn't work on Chromium either, at least nowadays (I'm using 63.0.3239.84). – Michael Dec 11 '17 at 22:24
2

This questions is already answered here. Just put height: 100% in both the div and the container td.

  • 3
    doesn't seem to work in Chrome – dude Jan 31 '18 at 8:04
  • not working in chrome – Mosè Raguzzini Oct 3 '18 at 12:43
-1

Really have to do this with JS. Here's a solution. I didn't use your class names, but I called the div within the td class name of "full-height" :-) Used jQuery, obviously. Note this was called from jQuery(document).ready(function(){ setFullHeights();}); Also note if you have images, you are going to have to iterate through them first with something like:

function loadedFullHeights(){
var imgCount = jQuery(".full-height").find("img").length;
if(imgCount===0){
    return setFullHeights();
}
var loaded = 0;
jQuery(".full-height").find("img").load(function(){
    loaded++;
    if(loaded ===imgCount){
        setFullHeights()
    }
});

}

And you would want to call the loadedFullHeights() from docReady instead. This is actually what I ended up using just in case. Got to think ahead you know!

function setFullHeights(){
var par;
var height;
var $ = jQuery;
var heights=[];
var i = 0;
$(".full-height").each(function(){
    par =$(this).parent();
    height = $(par).height();
    var tPad = Number($(par).css('padding-top').replace('px',''));
    var bPad = Number($(par).css('padding-bottom').replace('px',''));
    height -= tPad+bPad;
    heights[i]=height;
    i++;
});
for(ii in heights){
    $(".full-height").eq(ii).css('height', heights[ii]+'px');
}

}

-3

Modify the background image of the <td> itself.

Or apply some css to the div:

.thatSetsABackgroundWithAnIcon{
    height:100%;
}
  • as I write in the code. The TD already has a background-image set using a class. So that option is not viable. I have tried setting the height of the div to 100%, but that does not work. It simply wraps to the variable height of the contained <dl>. So something is needed to make the div "understand" that it should fill the height. And height: 100% does not do that. (not alone atleast) – CodeMonkey Aug 22 '10 at 15:54

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