40

I have a dictionary of dictionaries in Python 2.7.

I need to quickly count the number of all keys, including the keys within each of the dictionaries.

So in this example I would need the number of all keys to be 6:

dict_test = {'key2': {'key_in3': 'value', 'key_in4': 'value'}, 'key1': {'key_in2': 'value', 'key_in1': 'value'}}

I know I can iterate through each key with for loops, but I am looking for a quicker way to do this, since I will have thousands/millions of keys and doing this is just ineffective:

count_the_keys = 0

for key in dict_test.keys():
    for key_inner in dict_test[key].keys():
       count_the_keys += 1

# something like this would be more effective
# of course .keys().keys() doesn't work
print len(dict_test.keys()) * len(dict_test.keys().keys())
1
  • 1
    Although you don't ask for this, if you wanted the number of distinct keys then you could do something like len(set(itertools.chain(dict_test, *dict_test.values()))) Commented Feb 16, 2016 at 12:11

10 Answers 10

34

Keeping it Simple

If we know all the values are dictionaries, and do not wish to check that any of their values are also dictionaries, then it is as simple as:

len(dict_test) + sum(len(v) for v in dict_test.itervalues())

Refining it a little, to actually check that the values are dictionaries before counting them:

len(dict_test) + sum(len(v) for v in dict_test.itervalues() if isinstance(v, dict))

And finally, if you wish to do an arbitrary depth, something like the following:

def sum_keys(d):
    return (0 if not isinstance(d, dict) 
            else len(d) + sum(sum_keys(v) for v in d.itervalues())

print sum_keys({'key2': {'key_in3': 'value', 'key_in4': 'value'}, 
                'key1': {'key_in2': 'value', 
                         'key_in1': dict(a=2)}})
# => 7

In this last case, we define a function that will be called recursively. Given a value d, we return either:

  • 0 if that value is not a dictionary; or
  • the number of keys in the dictionary, plus the total of keys in all of our children.

Making it Faster

The above is a succinct and easily understood approach. We can get a little faster using a generator:

def _counter(d):
    # how many keys do we have?
    yield len(d)

    # stream the key counts of our children
    for v in d.itervalues():
        if isinstance(v, dict):
            for x in _counter(v):
                yield x

def count_faster(d):
    return sum(_counter(d))

This gets us a bit more performance:

In [1]: %timeit sum_keys(dict_test)
100000 loops, best of 3: 4.12 µs per loop

In [2]: %timeit count_faster(dict_test)
100000 loops, best of 3: 3.29 µs per loop
1
  • Thanks, this is very helpful. Especially the performance bit.
    – Ivan Bilan
    Commented Feb 17, 2016 at 15:58
9

How about

n = sum([len(v)+1 for k, v in dict_test.items()])

What you are doing is iterating over all keys k and values v. The values v are your subdictionaries. You get the length of those dictionaries and add one to include the key used to index the subdictionary.

Afterwards you sum over the list to get the complete number of keys.

EDIT:

To clarify, this snippet works only for dictionaries of dictionaries as asked. Not dictionaries of dictionaries of dictionaries...
So do not use it for nested example :)

6
  • 1
    This doesn't count "parent" keys.
    – Maroun
    Commented Feb 16, 2016 at 8:59
  • 3
    which is why I add one to every length Commented Feb 16, 2016 at 8:59
  • 2
    This is a dictionary of a dictionary of a dictionary. ivan_bilan asked for a dictionary of a dictionary... Commented Feb 16, 2016 at 9:03
  • 6
    @MarounMaroun: ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Wait, OP didn't mention about more nested examples, right? OP's code will also fail if the dict is like this.
    – Remi Guan
    Commented Feb 16, 2016 at 9:05
  • 1
    @KevinGuan if that's the case, then this answer is correct.
    – Maroun
    Commented Feb 16, 2016 at 9:07
9

As a more general way you can use a recursion function and generator expression:

>>> def count_keys(dict_test):
...     return sum(1+count_keys(v) if isinstance(v,dict) else 1 for _,v in dict_test.iteritems())
... 

Example:

>>> dict_test = {'a': {'c': '2', 'b': '1', 'e': {'f': {1: {5: 'a'}}}, 'd': '3'}}
>>> 
>>> count(dict_test)
8

Note: In python 3.X use dict.items() method instead of iteritems().

A benchmark with accepted answer which shows that this function is faster than accepted answer:

from timeit import timeit

s1 = """
def sum_keys(d):
    return 0 if not isinstance(d, dict) else len(d) + sum(sum_keys(v) for v in d.itervalues())

sum_keys(dict_test)
"""

s2 = """
def count_keys(dict_test):
    return sum(1+count_keys(v) if isinstance(v,dict) else 1 for _,v in dict_test.iteritems())

count_keys(dict_test)
   """

print '1st: ', timeit(stmt=s1,
                      number=1000000,
                      setup="dict_test = {'a': {'c': '2', 'b': '1', 'e': {'f': {1: {5: 'a'}}}, 'd': '3'}}")
print '2nd : ', timeit(stmt=s2,
                       number=1000000,
                       setup="dict_test = {'a': {'c': '2', 'b': '1', 'e': {'f': {1: {5: 'a'}}}, 'd': '3'}}")

result:

1st:  4.65556812286
2nd :  4.09120802879
4
  • 3
    This also fails to: dict_test = { "a": { "b": "1", "c": "2", "d": "3", "e": {"f": 1} }}
    – Idos
    Commented Feb 16, 2016 at 9:05
  • 1
    @Idos Yep it's for a 2 level type.
    – Mazdak
    Commented Feb 16, 2016 at 9:07
  • 1
    @Idos The OP only asked about a dictionary of dictionaries not an arbitrary nesting.
    – Matthew
    Commented Feb 16, 2016 at 9:08
  • @Idos Checkout the general answer.
    – Mazdak
    Commented Feb 16, 2016 at 9:17
6

Using a generator function and the yield from syntax new in Python 3.x. This will work for an arbitrary nested dictionary

>>> from collections import Mapping
>>> def count_keys(mydict):
...     for key, value in mydict.items():
...         if isinstance(value, Mapping):
...             yield from count_keys(value)
...     yield len(mydict)
... 
>>> dict_test = {'key2': {'key_in3': 'value', 'key_in4': 'value'}, 'key1': {'key_in2': 'value', 'key_in1': 'value'}}
>>> sum(count_keys(dict_test))
6

In Python 2.x you need a to do this:

>>> def count_keys(mydict):
...     for key, value in mydict.items():
...         if isinstance(value, Mapping):
...             for item in count_keys(value):
...                 yield 1
...         yield 1
... 
>>> sum(count_keys(dict_test))
6
0
5

Something like:

print len(dict_test) + sum(len(v) for v in dict_test.values())

6
  • 1
    Doesn't work for more nested examples, try this - {1: {1: {1: {1: 2}}, 2: 3}, 2: {1: 2, 2: 3}}
    – AlokThakur
    Commented Feb 16, 2016 at 9:03
  • 2
    @AlokThakur should it? I mean it was not requested. Commented Feb 16, 2016 at 9:04
  • it is printing 6 for the dictionary I mentioned above, are you getting different result ?
    – AlokThakur
    Commented Feb 16, 2016 at 9:05
  • 2
    @AlokThakur the question is about only one level deep, nothing is said about nesting. Read it. Commented Feb 16, 2016 at 9:07
  • 3
    @AlokThakur I'm writing those comments because this answer 100% satisfies what OP was asking and your comments are irrelevant. If you have a question how to implement it for more levels, please ask it. I would say you need recursive calls. Commented Feb 16, 2016 at 9:12
5

Here is the recursive function to find the nested dictionaries' total number of keys...

s=0
def recurse(v):
   if type(v)==type({}):
     for k in v.keys():
      global s
      s+=1
      recurse(v[k])
4

You could try using pandas DataFrame for that:

>>> import pandas as pd
>>> data = {'1': {'2': 'a', '3': 'b'}, '4': {'5': 'c', '6': 'd'}, '7': {'5': 'x'}}
>>> df = pd.DataFrame(data)
>>> print (df.count().sum() + len(df.columns))  # 8

The pd.DataFrame(data) line will convert your dictionary to a N x M matrix, where N is number of "parent" keys and M is the number of unique children keys:

     1    4    7
2    a  NaN  NaN
3    b  NaN  NaN
5  NaN    c    x
6  NaN    d  NaN

For each [row, column] you have a value or NaN. You just need to count the non NaN values, which will give you the number of children keys and add len(df.columns), which stands for the number of columns (i.e. parent keys).

3
  • 1
    Wouldn't this be inefficient/memory intensive, as the OP said the dictionaries could have thousands/millions of entries? I think the "empty" values (of which there would be a lot) may eat up a lot of wasted memory, but I am not completely sure how pandas stores those.
    – Matthew
    Commented Feb 16, 2016 at 9:17
  • @Matthew There sure would be one big matrix created. I am interested in the answer to this too.
    – Ivan Bilan
    Commented Feb 16, 2016 at 9:31
  • 2
    OP didn't mention anything about memory but the processing speed ;)
    – matino
    Commented Feb 16, 2016 at 9:44
4

recursive function:

def count_keys(some_dict):
    count = 0
    for key in some_dict:
        if isinstance(some_dict[key], dict):
            count += count_keys(some_dict[key])
        count += 1
    return count
4

len(dict) will return the number of keys in a dictionary, so, assuming you know how nested it is and that all the values are dictionaries:

counter = len(outer_dict)
for v in outer_dict.values :
    counter += len(v)

You can wrap this in a list comprehension :

counter = len(outer_dict)
counter += sum([len(inner_dict) for inner_dict in outer_dict.values])

which is probably the most pythonic. You can extend it as :

counter = len(outer_dict)
counter += sum([len(inner_dict) if isinstance(inner_dict, dict) else 0 for inner_dict in outer_dict.values])

but I tend to think that this is fairly unreadable.

3

Try this,

l = len(dict_test)
for k in dict_test:
    l += len(dict_test[k])

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