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I have a statement int *p = 10; . This statement executes perfectly fine on any compiler. I also know that 10 is put in read-only memory. Is there a way i can access this memory. How can I print this on console? The statement printf("%d",*p) crashes. How can I make it print on console.

Edit

int main()
{
   int *p = 10;
}

the above code compiles fine and runs fine.

int main()
{
    int *p = 10;
    printf("\n%d",*p); //crashes
}

the above code gives segmentation fault. I wanted to know more explanation on this?

7
  • 3
    "This statement executes perfectly fine on any compiler. " Actually it violates the rule of simple assignment and thus it will not work on any standard compiler. Out of curiosity, which compiler are you using, and how have you (mis)configured it? – Lundin Feb 16 '16 at 9:17
  • 2
    The 10 isn't put in read-only memory, it's put in the automatic variable p. – molbdnilo Feb 16 '16 at 9:21
  • I compiled this using "gcc version 4.1.2 20080704 (Red Hat 4.1.2-54) " – Meraj Hussain Feb 16 '16 at 9:25
  • 3
    I believe you're thinking of char* c = "abc";, where c is a pointer to the first element of an array that may be stored in read-only memory, but the value of c isn't stored in read-only memory in that case either. – molbdnilo Feb 16 '16 at 9:32
  • 3
    @MerajHussain GCC is by default a non-standard compiler. You should always use it with -std=c11 -pedantic-errors, otherwise it won't behave as a standard C compiler. In your case, the compiler is also so old that it doesn't even support C11, meaning you have to use -std=c99. – Lundin Feb 16 '16 at 9:34
9

By typing int *p = 10; you say to compiler:

Lets have a pointer on integer, called "p". Set p to 10 => p points on address 10 on memory.

By typing printf("%d",*p); you say to compiler:

Show me -as a integer- what is at the address 10 on memory.

The code

int *p = 10;

Is equivalent to:

int *p;
p = 10; 

Is not equivalent to:

int *p;
*p = 10; 

Corrected code could be:

// define an integer
int i;
// define a pointer on the integer
int *p = &i;
// set integer to 10, through pointer
*p = 10;

// display integer through pointer
printf("%d",*p);
2
  • How does this code work #include<stdio.h> int main() { char *str = "meraj"; printf("\n%s",str); return 0; } – Meraj Hussain Feb 16 '16 at 9:12
  • 5
    @purplepsycho You are wrong. String literal is stored into data segment. Pointer is stack allocated. – LPs Feb 16 '16 at 9:34
2

I think my answer is great for you,you may misunderstand the definition of the pointer and use the pointer in a wrong way. Let`s analyse your code first:

int *p = 10

this statement defines a pointer which is pointed to address 10 in memory, it compiles OK because there's no syntax error--the content of p is the address 10, but you have no idea what's value in address 10, and it generally doesn't have a internal memory to store a value cuz you haven`t allocate the memory for it.it's also very dangerous that you are tring to use a system memory 10.

You can print the address which has been pointed by p:

printf("%d\n", p);//p is pointed to address 10

So when you tried to print the content of p by:

printf("\n%d",*p);

which haven't allocate the memory to store the content,segmentation fault occurs!

If u want to assign value for pointer directly u must dynamic application of memory space for it first, you should write in this way:

int *p = NULL;//the right and safe habit to define a pointer

p = (int *)malloc (sizeof(int));//dynamic application of memory space of pointer p to store value
if (NULL == p)
{
    printf("malloc failed!\n");//show error
    exit(1);//exit
}

*p = 10;//now you have memory space to store value 10
printf("%d\n", *p);

free(p);//release the memory to avoid memory leaks
p = NULL;//the right and safe habit

You can also write in this way:

int transfer_value = 10;//integer has memory when you declare it
int *p = &transfer_value;//p stores the address of i which content is value 10

printf("%d\n", *p);//because variable i has memory which size is sizeof(int), you can print *p(it stands for the value of i)directly.

Hope my explanation could help you ^_^

1

Segmentation fault is a error when there is a memory access violation. Dynamic memory allocation will solve your problem. Kernel will decide which memory address should be used to store the value.

   #include<stdio.h>
   #include<stdlib.h> 
   int main()
   {
   int *p = malloc(sizeof(int)); //Kernel will assign a memory from Heap segment 
   *p=10;
   printf("\n%d",*p); 
   free(p);
   }
0

You have created a pointer, not a value. You probable want just int i=10. Otherwise, the program is accessing random memory at address 10 and will crash.

0

When you assign the value 10 to your pointer, you actually assign the address 10 to it. When you initialize you don't get any error, but when you try to print it you have to access it, and you don't have access to this memory address (that's why you have a segmentation fault).

If you do this :

int i = 10;
int *ptr = &i;
printf("%d\n", *ptr);

It will work because you make the pointer points to the variable i which contains the value 10.

0
int *p = 10;

creates a pointer p and sets it to point to the memory address 10, which is most likely not an accessible address on your platform, hence the crash in the printf statement.

A valid pointer is obtained by using the unary & operator on another object, such as

int i = 10;
int *p = &i;

or by calling a function that returns a pointer value such as malloc or fopen. Some platforms may expose specific addresses for particular operations, but those are usually well-documented and not such low address values.

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