382

I am creating an array of objects in TypeScript:

 userTestStatus xxxx = {
    "0": { "id": 0, "name": "Available" },
    "1": { "id": 1, "name": "Ready" },
    "2": { "id": 2, "name": "Started" }
 };

Can someone tell me how I could declare its type correctly? Is it possible to do inline or would I need two definitions?

I'm looking to replace the xxx with a type declaration, so that later on TypeScript would alert me if I used something like userTestStatus[3].nammme by mistake.

8 Answers 8

529

You are better off using a native array instead of an object literal with number-like properties, so that numbering (as well as numerous other array functions) are taken care of off-the-shelf.

What you are looking for here is an inline interface definition for your array that defines every element in that array, whether initially present or introduced later:

let userTestStatus: { id: number, name: string }[] = [
    { "id": 0, "name": "Available" },
    { "id": 1, "name": "Ready" },
    { "id": 2, "name": "Started" }
];

userTestStatus[34978].nammme; // Error: Property 'nammme' does not exist on type [...]

If you are initializing your array with values right away, the explicit type definition is not a necessity; TypeScript can automatically infer most element types from the initial assignment:

let userTestStatus = [
    { "id": 0, "name": "Available" },
    ...
];

userTestStatus[34978].nammme; // Error: Property 'nammme' does not exist on type [...]
3
  • 28
    Also you can declare an array of objects this way: let someArray: Array<{ id: number, name: string }> = [] Sep 19, 2019 at 8:14
  • 2
    Show us an add method. Assigning all at once is not always possible
    – Sujoy
    Nov 28, 2021 at 10:06
  • @Sujoy same as in JS, i.e. userTestStatus.push - it will also be type safe based on the initial assignment or type definition.
    – John Weisz
    Nov 28, 2021 at 11:01
135

What you have above is an object, not an array.

To make an array use [ & ] to surround your objects.

userTestStatus = [
  { "id": 0, "name": "Available" },
  { "id": 1, "name": "Ready" },
  { "id": 2, "name": "Started" }
];

Aside from that TypeScript is a superset of JavaScript so whatever is valid JavaScript will be valid TypeScript so no other changes are needed.

Feedback clarification from OP... in need of a definition for the model posted

You can use the types defined here to represent your object model:

type MyType = {
    id: number;
    name: string;
}

type MyGroupType = {
    [key:string]: MyType;
}

var obj: MyGroupType = {
    "0": { "id": 0, "name": "Available" },
    "1": { "id": 1, "name": "Ready" },
    "2": { "id": 2, "name": "Started" }
};
// or if you make it an array
var arr: MyType[] = [
    { "id": 0, "name": "Available" },
    { "id": 1, "name": "Ready" },
    { "id": 2, "name": "Started" }
];
9
  • Sorry maybe my question was not clear. What I wanted to do was to find a definition for userTestStatus.
    – user1679941
    Feb 16, 2016 at 14:29
  • 1
    @Marilou You can usually get the definition simply by hovering over the userTestStatus variable in your favourite IDE... the TypeScript playground shows { id: number, name: string; }[]. You could wrap that in an interface if you like interface NameThis { id: number, name: string; } and NameThis[] as the array type.
    – Fenton
    Feb 16, 2016 at 14:40
  • I tried this but it gives me a few errors. However I think it's something like I want: userTestStatus: { id: number, name: string; }[] = { "0": { "id": 0, "name": "Available" }, "1": { "id": 1, "name": "Ready" },
    – user1679941
    Feb 16, 2016 at 14:51
  • In your example defining var arr: MyType, you wouldn't use the property name/index declarations such as "0": { … }; you would just use the object literal at this point.
    – gfullam
    Feb 16, 2016 at 14:55
  • @gfullam you are correct, I updated my answer (it was a quick careless edit)
    – Brocco
    Feb 16, 2016 at 14:57
70

Some tslint rules are disabling use of [], example message: Array type using 'T[]' is forbidden for non-simple types. Use 'Array<T>' instead.

Then you would write it like:

var userTestStatus: Array<{ id: number, name: string }> = Array(
    { "id": 0, "name": "Available" },
    { "id": 1, "name": "Ready" },
    { "id": 2, "name": "Started" }
);
0
49

Array<T>

person: Array<{
  name: string;
  age: number;
}>
2
  • 19
    Please try to explain your answer instead of just providing code--this helps the OP learn and also helps others who visit your answer.
    – AlexH
    Oct 21, 2020 at 2:24
  • this is what im looking for. array of object
    – angry kiwi
    Sep 4, 2021 at 10:53
27

What you really want may simply be an enumeration

If you're looking for something that behaves like an enumeration (because I see you are defining an object and attaching a sequential ID 0, 1, 2 and contains a name field that you don't want to misspell (e.g. name vs naaame), you're better off defining an enumeration because the sequential ID is taken care of automatically, and provides type verification for you out of the box.

enum TestStatus {
    Available,     // 0
    Ready,         // 1
    Started,       // 2
}

class Test {
    status: TestStatus
}

var test = new Test();
test.status = TestStatus.Available; // type and spelling is checked for you,
                                    // and the sequence ID is automatic

The values above will be automatically mapped, e.g. "0" for "Available", and you can access them using TestStatus.Available. And Typescript will enforce the type when you pass those around.

If you insist on defining a new type as an array of your custom type

You wanted an array of objects, (not exactly an object with keys "0", "1" and "2"), so let's define the type of the object, first, then a type of a containing array.

class TestStatus {
    id: number
    name: string

    constructor(id, name){
        this.id = id;
        this.name = name;
    }
}

type Statuses = Array<TestStatus>;

var statuses: Statuses = [
    new TestStatus(0, "Available"),
    new TestStatus(1, "Ready"),
    new TestStatus(2, "Started")
]
2
  • Sorry maybe my question was not clear. What I wanted to do was to find a definition for userTestStatus so that Typescript would allow me to check where it is used and so for example I could not enter userTestStatus[1].naaaame.
    – user1679941
    Feb 16, 2016 at 14:29
  • I wanted to find something to put in between the "userTestStatus" and the "=". In the same way that I might put string or number there to say what type the variable has. Something like Brocco just did but with just one line if that is possible.
    – user1679941
    Feb 16, 2016 at 14:37
17

A little old but I felt I could add some clarity to this.

Exact Answer

    interface MyObject {
      id: number;
      name: string;
    }

    interface MyExactData {
      [key: string]: MyObject;
    }

    let userTestStatus: MyExactData = {
      "0": { "id": 0, "name": "Available" },
      "1": { "id": 1, "name": "Ready" },
      "2": { "id": 2, "name": "Started" }
    };

But the above is not how we usually do an array of objects, you would use the simple native array in javaScript.

    interface MyObject { // define the object (singular)
      id: number;
      name: string;
    }

    let userTestStatus_better: MyObject[] = [
      { "id": 0, "name": "Available" },
      { "id": 1, "name": "Ready" },
      { "id": 2, "name": "Started" }
    ];

Simply adding [] to our interface provides the typing for an array of said objects. And to do that inline

    let userTestStatus_inline: {id:number, name:string}[] = [
      { "id": 0, "name": "Available" },
      { "id": 1, "name": "Ready" },
      { "id": 2, "name": "Started" }
    ];

I would use the interface as you have something that is definable, understandable, and reusable. If you need to make changes, you can make changes to the one interface and typescript will report your interface to code mismatches.

1
  • Your answer helped me to understand to declare in line data type of object. Thanks
    – Prabhakar
    Jun 5 at 2:41
3

You can also try

    interface IData{
        id: number;
        name:string;
    }

    let userTestStatus:Record<string,IData> = {
        "0": { "id": 0, "name": "Available" },
        "1": { "id": 1, "name": "Ready" },
        "2": { "id": 2, "name": "Started" }
    };

To check how record works: https://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/utility-types.html#recordkt

Here in our case Record is used to declare an object whose key will be a string and whose value will be of type IData so now it will provide us intellisense when we will try to access its property and will throw type error in case we will try something like userTestStatus[0].nameee

1
  • you should give more info as to why this solves the problem at hand Nov 12, 2019 at 21:26
1
 var xxxx : { [key:number]: MyType };

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