34

How can I get number of partitions for any kafka topic from the code. I have researched many links but none seem to work.

Mentioning a few:

http://grokbase.com/t/kafka/users/148132gdzk/find-topic-partition-count-through-simpleclient-api

http://grokbase.com/t/kafka/users/151cv3htga/get-replication-and-partition-count-of-a-topic

http://qnalist.com/questions/5809219/get-replication-and-partition-count-of-a-topic

which look like similar discussions.

Also there are similar links on SO which do not have a working solution to this.

  • Which Kafka version? – Marko Bonaci Feb 16 '16 at 17:48
  • vish4071, how about accepting the solution you ended up using? – Marko Bonaci Oct 7 '18 at 9:09

15 Answers 15

11

In the 0.82 Producer API and 0.9 Consumer api you can use something like

Properties configProperties = new Properties();
configProperties.put(ProducerConfig.BOOTSTRAP_SERVERS_CONFIG,"localhost:9092");
configProperties.put(ProducerConfig.KEY_SERIALIZER_CLASS_CONFIG,"org.apache.kafka.common.serialization.ByteArraySerializer");
configProperties.put(ProducerConfig.VALUE_SERIALIZER_CLASS_CONFIG,"org.apache.kafka.common.serialization.StringSerializer");

org.apache.kafka.clients.producer.Producer producer = new KafkaProducer(configProperties);
producer.partitionsFor("test")
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72

Go to your kafka/bin directory.

Then run this:

./kafka-topics.sh --describe --zookeeper localhost:2181 --topic topic_name

You should see what you need under PartitionCount.

Topic:topic_name        PartitionCount:5        ReplicationFactor:1     Configs:
        Topic: topic_name       Partition: 0    Leader: 1001    Replicas: 1001  Isr: 1001
        Topic: topic_name       Partition: 1    Leader: 1001    Replicas: 1001  Isr: 1001
        Topic: topic_name       Partition: 2    Leader: 1001    Replicas: 1001  Isr: 1001
        Topic: topic_name       Partition: 3    Leader: 1001    Replicas: 1001  Isr: 1001
        Topic: topic_name       Partition: 4    Leader: 1001    Replicas: 1001  Isr: 1001
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  • 8
    Upvoting because I happened to be searching for a non-code solution and this was perfect. – David Kaczynski Mar 2 '17 at 15:24
7

Below shell cmd can print the number of partitions. You should be in kafka bin directory before executing the cmd:

sh kafka-topics.sh --describe --zookeeper localhost:2181 --topic **TopicName** | awk '{print $2}' | uniq -c |awk 'NR==2{print "count of partitions=" $1}'

Note that you have to change the topic name according to your need. You can further validate this using if condition as well:

sh kafka-topics.sh --describe --zookeeper localhost:2181 --topic **TopicName** | awk '{print $2}' | uniq -c |awk 'NR==2{if ($1=="16") print "valid partitions"}'

The above cmd command prints valid partitions if count is 16. You can change count depending on your requirement.

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6

Here's how I do it:

  /**
   * Retrieves list of all partitions IDs of the given {@code topic}.
   * 
   * @param topic
   * @param seedBrokers List of known brokers of a Kafka cluster
   * @return list of partitions or empty list if none found
   */
  public static List<Integer> getPartitionsForTopic(String topic, List<BrokerInfo> seedBrokers) {
    for (BrokerInfo seed : seedBrokers) {
      SimpleConsumer consumer = null;
      try {
        consumer = new SimpleConsumer(seed.getHost(), seed.getPort(), 20000, 128 * 1024, "partitionLookup");
        List<String> topics = Collections.singletonList(topic);
        TopicMetadataRequest req = new TopicMetadataRequest(topics);
        kafka.javaapi.TopicMetadataResponse resp = consumer.send(req);

        List<Integer> partitions = new ArrayList<>();
        // find our partition's metadata
        List<TopicMetadata> metaData = resp.topicsMetadata();
        for (TopicMetadata item : metaData) {
          for (PartitionMetadata part : item.partitionsMetadata()) {
            partitions.add(part.partitionId());
          }
        }
        return partitions;  // leave on first successful broker (every broker has this info)
      } catch (Exception e) {
        // try all available brokers, so just report error and go to next one
        LOG.error("Error communicating with broker [" + seed + "] to find list of partitions for [" + topic + "]. Reason: " + e);
      } finally {
        if (consumer != null)
          consumer.close();
      }
    }
    throw new RuntimeError("Could not get partitions");
  }

Note that I just needed to pull out partition IDs, but you can additionally retrieve any other partition metadata, like leader, isr, replicas, ...
And BrokerInfo is just a simple POJO that has host and port fields.

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5

In java code we can use AdminClient to get sum partions of one topic.

Properties props = new Properties();
props.put("bootstrap.servers", "host:9092");
AdminClient client = AdminClient.create(props);

DescribeTopicsResult result = client.describeTopics(Arrays.asList("TEST"));
Map<String, KafkaFuture<TopicDescription>>  values = result.values();
KafkaFuture<TopicDescription> topicDescription = values.get("TEST");
int partitions = topicDescription.get().partitions().size();
System.out.println(partitions);
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4

So the following approach works for kafka 0.10 and it does not use any producer or consumer APIs. It uses some classes from the scala API in kafka such as ZkConnection and ZkUtils.

    ZkConnection zkConnection = new ZkConnection(zkConnect);
    ZkUtils zkUtils = new ZkUtils(zkClient,zkConnection,false);
    System.out.println(JavaConversions.mapAsJavaMap(zkUtils.getPartitionAssignmentForTopics(
         JavaConversions.asScalaBuffer(topicList))).get("bidlogs_kafka10").size());
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3

I have had the same issue, where I needed to get the partitions for a topic.

With the help of the answer here I was able to get the information from Zookeeper.

Here is my code in Scala (but could be easily translated into Java)

import org.apache.zookeeper.ZooKeeper

def extractPartitionNumberForTopic(topicName: String, zookeeperQurom: String): Int = {
  val zk = new ZooKeeper(zookeeperQurom, 10000, null);
  val zkNodeName = s"/brokers/topics/$topicName/partitions"
  val numPartitions = zk.getChildren(zkNodeName, false).size
  zk.close()
  numPartitions
}

Using this approach allowed me to access the information about Kafka topics as well as other information about Kafka brokers ...

From Zookeeper you could check for the number of partitions for a topic by browsing to /brokers/topics/MY_TOPIC_NAME/partitions

Using zookeeper-client.sh to connect to your zookeeper:

[zk: ZkServer:2181(CONNECTED) 5] ls /brokers/topics/MY_TOPIC_NAME/partitions
[0, 1, 2]

That shows us that there are 3 partitions for the topic MY_TOPIC_NAME

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2

The number of partitions can be retrieved from zookeeper-shell

Syntax: ls /brokers/topics/<topic_name>/partitions

Below is the example:

root@zookeeper-01:/opt/kafka_2.11-2.0.0# bin/zookeeper-shell.sh zookeeper-01:2181
Connecting to zookeeper-01:2181
Welcome to ZooKeeper!
JLine support is disabled

WATCHER::

WatchedEvent state:SyncConnected type:None path:null
ls /brokers/topics/test/partitions
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4]
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1

@Sunil-patil answer stopped short of answering the count piece of it. You have to get the size of the List

producer.partitionsFor("test").size()

@vish4071 no point butting Sunil, you did not mention that you are using ConsumerConnector in the question.

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1

You can explore the kafka.utils.ZkUtils which has many methods aimed to help extract metadata about the cluster. The answers here are nice so I'm just adding for the sake of diversity:

import kafka.utils.ZkUtils
import org.I0Itec.zkclient.ZkClient

def getTopicPartitionCount(zookeeperQuorum: String, topic: String): Int = {
  val client = new ZkClient(zookeeperQuorum)
  val partitionCount = ZkUtils.getAllPartitions(client)
    .count(topicPartitionPair => topicPartitionPair.topic == topic)

  client.close
  partitionCount
}
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1
cluster.availablePartitionsForTopic(topicName).size()
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1
//create the kafka producer
def getKafkaProducer: KafkaProducer[String, String] = {
val kafkaProps: Properties = new Properties()
kafkaProps.put("bootstrap.servers", "localhost:9092")
kafkaProps.put("key.serializer",
"org.apache.kafka.common.serialization.StringSerializer")
kafkaProps.put("value.serializer", 
"org.apache.kafka.common.serialization.StringSerializer")

new KafkaProducer[String, String](kafkaProps)
}
val kafkaProducer = getKafkaProducer
val noOfPartition = kafkaProducer.partitionsFor("TopicName") 
println(noOfPartition) //it will print the number of partiton for the given 
//topic
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1

Use PartitionList from KafkaConsumer

     //create consumer then loop through topics
    KafkaConsumer<String, String> consumer = new KafkaConsumer<String, String>(props);
    List<PartitionInfo> partitions = consumer.partitionsFor(topic);

    ArrayList<Integer> partitionList = new ArrayList<>();
    System.out.println(partitions.get(0).partition());

    for(int i = 0; i < partitions.size(); i++){
        partitionList.add(partitions.get(i).partition());
    }

    Collections.sort(partitionList);

Should work like a charm. Let me know if there's a simpler way to access Partition List from Topic.

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1

You can get kafka partition list from zookeeper like this. It is real kafka server side partition number.

[zk: zk.kafka:2181(CONNECTED) 43] ls /users/test_account/test_kafka_name/brokers/topics/test_kafka_topic_name/partitions
[35, 36, 159, 33, 34, 158, 157, 39, 156, 37, 155, 38, 154, 152, 153, 150, 151, 43, 42, 41, 40, 202, 203, 204, 205, 200, 201, 22, 23, 169, 24, 25, 26, 166, 206, 165, 27, 207, 168, 208, 28, 29, 167, 209, 161, 3, 2, 162, 1, 163, 0, 164, 7, 30, 6, 32, 5, 160, 31, 4, 9, 8, 211, 212, 210, 215, 216, 213, 19, 214, 17, 179, 219, 18, 178, 177, 15, 217, 218, 16, 176, 13, 14, 11, 12, 21, 170, 20, 171, 174, 175, 172, 173, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227, 188, 228, 187, 229, 189, 180, 10, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 116, 117, 79, 114, 78, 77, 115, 112, 113, 110, 111, 118, 119, 82, 83, 80, 81, 86, 87, 84, 85, 67, 125, 66, 126, 69, 127, 128, 68, 121, 122, 123, 124, 129, 70, 71, 120, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 134, 135, 132, 133, 59, 138, 58, 57, 139, 136, 56, 137, 55, 64, 65, 62, 63, 60, 131, 130, 61, 49, 143, 48, 144, 145, 146, 45, 147, 44, 148, 47, 149, 46, 51, 52, 53, 54, 140, 142, 141, 50, 109, 108, 107, 106, 105, 104, 103, 99, 102, 101, 100, 98, 97, 96, 95, 94, 93, 92, 91, 90, 88, 89, 195, 194, 197, 196, 191, 190, 193, 192, 198, 199, 230, 239, 232, 231, 234, 233, 236, 235, 238, 237]

And you can use partition count at consumer code.

  def getNumPartitions(topic: String): Int = {
    val zk = CuratorFrameworkFactory.newClient(zkHostList, new RetryNTimes(5, 1000))

    zk.start()
    var numPartitions: Int = 0
    val topicPartitionsPath = zkPath + "/brokers/topics/" + topic + "/partitions"

    if (zk.checkExists().forPath(topicPartitionsPath) != null) {
        try {
            val brokerIdList = zk.getChildren().forPath(topicPartitionsPath).asScala
            numPartitions = brokerIdList.length.toInt
        } catch {
            case e: Exception => {
                e.printStackTrace()
            }  
        }  
    }  
    zk.close()

    numPartitions
  }
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0

To get the list of partitions the ideal/actual way is to use the AdminClients API

    Properties properties=new Properties();
    properties.put(AdminClientConfig.BOOTSTRAP_SERVERS_CONFIG,"localhost:9092");
    AdminClient adminClient=KafkaAdminClient.create(properties);
    Map<String, TopicDescription> jension = adminClient.describeTopics(Collections.singletonList("jenison")).all().get();
    System.out.println(jension.get("jenison").partitions().size());

This can be run as a standalone java method with no producer/consumer dependencies.

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