14

How can I generically create a zero of an arbitrary numeric type?

Here's a toy example: a function that converts a null number into zero.

static <T extends Number> T zeroIfNull(T value) {
    return value == null ? 0 : value;
}

This doesn't compile because the literal zero is of type int, and I need to convert that to type T.

Is it possible to do this at all?

2

Zero isn't even mentioned in the Number class. If you must do this, and I suggest avoiding nulls, is perhaps:

public static <T> T coalesce(T a, T b) {
    return a==null ? b : a;
}

You could also create a generic interface for handling numbers with features that make sense to your code:

interface NumberOps<T extends Number> {
    T zeroIfNull(T value);
}
  • This is the most elegant approach. I wish Java had a coalesce operator. Maybe I should just use C# :) – Bennett McElwee Aug 23 '10 at 22:17
  • coalesce looks like one of the worst named functions – ACV Jul 6 '18 at 10:30
  • 2
    @ACV My worst named function is doIntersectionPrivilege, for which I am truly sorry. coalesce is from the SQL function of the same functionality (except a variable number of arguments, an unnecessary complication in this example). – Tom Hawtin - tackline Jul 10 '18 at 12:24
3

Is it possible to do this at all?
Not really. For one thing, when value is null, how would method know which Number implementation to return?

  • Yes, you're right of course. Type erasure bites me again. – Bennett McElwee Aug 23 '10 at 2:33
  • @Bennett It's not only about type erasure. If you declare Number num = null; and call zeroIfNull(num), even without type erasure it will be confusing. – Nikita Rybak Aug 23 '10 at 2:47
  • If you change the signature slightly static <T extends Number> T zeroIfNull(T value, Class<T> clazz) then you could overcome type erasure. You still have to decide what to do when T is not one of the standard classes. (E.G. Prime models prime numbers 2,3,... and has no zero value. What does zeroIfNull(null,Prime.class) do?) – emory Aug 23 '10 at 3:06
  • If it weren't for type erasure then that wouldn't be confusing. It would simply be a runtime error. – Bennett McElwee Aug 23 '10 at 3:11
  • @emory Your Prime example is very instructive. I have implicitly assumed that all Numbers have a zero value. It's true of the JDK Number hierarchy, but not in general. As for your solution of passing in a Class, it might work, but still, how do I actually create the zero, given a Class object? – Bennett McElwee Aug 23 '10 at 3:16
0

try:

   return value == null ? (T)Integer.valueOf(0) : value;
  • The only problem is that it always returns zero of integer type. (Also, you can replace "Integer.valueOf(0)" with "0" due to autoboxing) – Nikita Rybak Aug 23 '10 at 2:45
  • Integer is kind of Number. It's OK for return <T extends Number>, and since a null(no specific type) is passed in, Integer is OK. – 卢声远 Shengyuan Lu Aug 23 '10 at 3:06
  • I tried this, and it might even work in my case since the returned value only gets converted to a String with toString() anyway. But if I called it with a BigInteger value and then tried to call abs() then things would get ugly. – Bennett McElwee Aug 23 '10 at 3:09
  • yeah, yeah, yeah, but the question was about creating zero instance of "T" type, not Integer type. – Nikita Rybak Aug 23 '10 at 3:14
0

This is an old question but after struggling with this issue for some time I came up with a solution that may be of interest to others:

@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
public static <T extends Number> T getZero() {
    return (T)((Integer)0);
}

This works fine as long as when it comes to arithmetic operations you can convert the Number instance to some known type, for example:

double getSquareRoot(T x) {
    return Math.sqrt(x.doubleValue());
}

In such situations it does not matter the type of the variable if it is an instance of Number it is always possible to get a double.

0

This method requires a typeclass so you either need a T object instance to get it from, or the typeclass directly.

T castedValue = NumberCast.cast((Class<T>)someTObject.getClass(), 0d);

public class NumberCast
{
    public static <T extends Number> T cast(Class<T> typeClass, double value)
    {
        if (typeClass == Double.class)
            return typeClass.cast(value);
        else if (typeClass == Float.class)
            return typeClass.cast((float)value);
        else if (typeClass == Integer.class)
            return typeClass.cast((int)Math.round(value));
        else if (typeClass == Short.class)
            return typeClass.cast((short)Math.round(value));
        else if (typeClass == Long.class)
            return typeClass.cast(Math.round(value));

        return null;
    }
}
-1

Not that elegant, but I think in most similar case, that's what we can do:

static <T extends Number> T zeroIfNull(T value, Class<T> clazz) {...}

and when used:

BigDecimal v = zeroIfNull(orignalVal, BigDecimal.class);
  • But how do you implement the method? – Bennett McElwee Aug 23 '10 at 3:16
-1

You can use method overloading to achieve this:

public static Double getValue(Double value) {
  return value != null ? value : 0;
}

public static Long getValue(Long value) {
  return value != null ? value : 0;
}

public static Integer getValue(Integer value) {
  return value != null ? value : 0;
}
  • I wanted to do it generically rather than writing special code for every numeric type. – Bennett McElwee Jul 9 '18 at 0:07
  • @BennettMcElwee, generic it is not possible, but this is the best nearest solution you can use afaik. – ACV Jul 9 '18 at 15:36
-2
import java . math . * ;

class Numbers
{
    public static < T extends Number > T zeroIfNull ( T number , Class<T> clazz ) throws IllegalArgumentException
    {
    if ( clazz == Integer . class )
        {
        return zeroIfNull ( number , clazz , 0 ) ;
        }
    else if ( clazz == Double . class )
        {
        return zeroIfNull ( number , clazz , 0 ) ;
        }
    else if ( clazz == BigInteger . class )
        {
        return zeroIfNull ( number , clazz , BigInteger . ZERO ) ;
        }
    // add a whole bunch more if statements
    throw new IllegalArgumentException ( "Unexpected Number Class " + clazz . getName ( ) + " with possibly undefined zero value." ) ;
    }

    private static < T extends Number > T zeroIfNull ( T number , Class<T> clazz , Object zero )
    {
    if ( number == null )
        {
        return ( clazz . cast ( zero ) ) ;
        }
    else
        {
        return ( number ) ;
        }
    }
}
  • Hmmm. I guess Object zero should be T zero in that second method, for clarity at least. – Bennett McElwee Aug 23 '10 at 4:20
  • @Bennett Then it would not compile. You would have to add casting in the first method. If you make the second method private and only call it from the first method, then the zero values will be of type T and the cast will not be a problem. – emory Aug 23 '10 at 4:34
  • Oh yeah, of course you'll have to cast the zeros. As I said, this would aid clarity. – Bennett McElwee Aug 23 '10 at 22:12
-2

The following is an improvement on my first answer.

import java . math . * ;
import java . util . * ;

class Numbers
{
    private static final Map<Class<? extends Number>,Object> zeroes = new HashMap<Class<? extends Number>,Object> ( ) ;

    static
    {
         zeroes . put ( Integer . class , new Integer ( 0 ) ) ;
         zeroes . put ( Double . class , new Double ( 0.0 ) ) ;
         zeroes . put ( BigInteger . class , BigInteger . ZERO ) ;
         // fill it up with all supported classes
    }

    public static < T extends Number > T zeroIfNull ( T number , Class<T> clazz ) throws IllegalArgumentException
    {
    if ( number == null ) // return zero (if we know what zero is)
        {
        if ( zeroes . containsKey ( clazz ) )
            {
            return ( clazz . cast ( zeroes . get ( clazz ) ) ) ;
            }
        throw new IllegalArgumentException ( "Unexpected Number Class " + clazz . getName ( ) + " with undefined zero value." ) ;
        }
    return number ;
    }
}
  • Yes, this sort of thing is why I asked the question. I was hoping there would be a better way. – Bennett McElwee Aug 23 '10 at 22:14

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