34

In Laravel, database seeding is generally accomplished through Model factories. So you define a blueprint for your Model using Faker data, and say how many instances you need:

$factory->define(App\User::class, function (Faker\Generator $faker) {
    return [
        'name' => $faker->name,
        'email' => $faker->email,
        'password' => bcrypt(str_random(10)),
        'remember_token' => str_random(10),
    ];
});

$user = factory(App\User::class, 50)->create();

However, lets say your User model has a hasMany relationship with many other Models, like a Post model for example:

Post:
   id
   name
   body
   user_id

So in this situation, you want to seed your Posts table with actual users that were seeded in your Users table. This doesn't seem to be explicitly discussed, but I did find the following in the Laravel docs:

$users = factory(App\User::class, 3)
    ->create()
    ->each(function($u) {
         $u->posts()->save(factory(App\Post::class)->make());
    });

So in your User factory, you create X number of Posts for each User you create. However, in a large application where maybe 50 - 75 Models share relationships with the User Model, your User Seeder would essentially end up seeding the entire database with all it's relationships.

My question is: Is this the best way to handle this? The only other thing I can think of is to Seed the Users first (without seeding any relations), and then pull random Users from the DB as needed while you are seeding other Models. However, in cases where they need to be unique, you'd have to keep track of which Users had been used. Also, it seems this would add a lot of extra query-bulk to the seeding process.

7 Answers 7

52

You can use saveMany as well. For example:

factory(User::class, 10)->create()->each(function ($user) {
    $user->posts()->saveMany(factory(Posts::class, 5)->make());
});
3
  • 1
    I didn't know about saveMany() until I saw this answer. Thank you. :)
    – Vaughany
    Jan 10, 2018 at 11:20
  • What's the difference / benefit in saveMany compared to create?
    – ejntaylor
    Apr 1, 2020 at 8:30
  • How will the new $user->id be added to the new posts user_id?
    – PeterPan
    May 6 at 6:51
31

You can do this using closures within the ModelFactory as discussed here.

This solution works cleanly and elegantly with seeders as well.

$factory->define(App\User::class, function (Faker\Generator $faker) {
    return [
        'name' => $faker->name,
        'email' => $faker->email,
        'password' => bcrypt(str_random(10)),
        'remember_token' => str_random(10),
    ];
});

$factory->define(App\Post::class, function (Faker\Generator $faker) {
    return [
        'name' => $faker->name,
        'body' => $faker->paragraph(1),
        'user_id' => function() {
            return factory(App\User::class)->create()->id;
        },
    ];
});

For your seeder, use something simple like this:

//create 10 users
factory(User::class, 10)->create()->each(function ($user) {
    //create 5 posts for each user
    factory(Post::class, 5)->create(['user_id'=>$user->id]);
});

NOTE: This method does not create unneeded entries in the database, instead the passed attributes are assigned BEFORE the creation of associated records.

3
  • Should be the best answer :) Thanks! Your answer saved a lot of my time. Aug 9, 2019 at 16:07
  • 2
    One of the best answers. Also these days you can get away with slightly simpler approach in the post factory 'user_id' => factory(User::class), no need for the clojure anymore.
    – FAB
    Feb 19, 2020 at 21:52
  • @FAB How will you consume the user_id in the posts's factory?
    – PeterPan
    May 6 at 6:55
9

Personally I think one Seeder class to manage these relations is nicer then separated seeder classes, because you have all the logic in one place, so in one look you can see what is going on. (Anyone that knows a better approach: please share) :)

A solution might be: one DatabaseSeeder and private methods within the class to keep the 'run' method a bit cleaner. I have this example below, which has a User, Link, LinkUser (many-to-many) and a Note (many-to-one).

For the many-to-many relations I first create all the Links, and get the inserted ids. (since the ids are auto-inc I think the ids could be fetched easier (get max), but doesn't matter in this example). Then create the users, and attach some random links to each user (many-to-many). It also creates random notes for each user (many-to-one example). It uses the 'factory' methods.

If you replace the 'Link' for your 'Post' this should work. (You can remove the 'Note' section then...)

(There is also a method to make sure you have 1 valid user with your own login credentials.)

<?php

use Illuminate\Database\Seeder;

class DatabaseSeeder extends Seeder
{
    /**
     * Run the database seeds.
     *
     * @return void
     */
    public function run()
    {
        // Create random links
        factory(App\Link::class, 100)->create();

        // Fetch the link ids
        $link_ids = App\Link::all('id')->pluck('id')->toArray();

        // Create random users
        factory(App\User::class, 50)->create()->each(function ($user) use ($link_ids) {

            // Example: Many-to-many relations
            $this->attachRandomLinksToUser($user->id, $link_ids);

            // Example: Many-to-one relations
            $this->createNotesForUserId( $user->id );
        });

        // Make sure you have a user to login with (your own email, name and password)
        $this->updateCredentialsForTestLogin('john@doe.com', 'John Doe', 'my-password');
    }

    /**
     * @param $user_id
     * @param $link_ids
     * @return void
     */
    private function attachRandomLinksToUser($user_id, $link_ids)
    {
        $amount = random_int( 0, count($link_ids) ); // The amount of links for this user
        echo "Attach " . $amount . " link(s) to user " . $user_id . "\n";

        if($amount > 0) {
            $keys = (array)array_rand($link_ids, $amount); // Random links

            foreach($keys as $key) {
                DB::table('link_user')->insert([
                    'link_id' => $link_ids[$key],
                    'user_id' => $user_id,
                ]);
            }
        }
    }

    /**
     * @param $user_id
     * @return void
     */
    private function createNotesForUserId($user_id)
    {
        $amount = random_int(10, 50);
        factory(App\Note::class, $amount)->create([
            'user_id' => $user_id
        ]);
    }

    /**
     * @param $email
     * @param $name
     * @param $password
     * @return void
     */
    private function updateCredentialsForTestLogin($email, $name, $password)
    {
        $user = App\User::where('email', $email)->first();
        if(!$user) {
            $user = App\User::find(1);
        }
        $user->name = $name;
        $user->email = $email;
        $user->password = bcrypt($password); // Or whatever you use for password encryption
        $user->save();
    }
}
6
$factory->define(App\User::class, function (Faker\Generator $faker) {
    return [
        'name' => $faker->name,
        'email' => $faker->email,
        'password' => bcrypt(str_random(10)),
        'remember_token' => str_random(10),
    ];
});

$factory->define(App\Post::class, function (Faker\Generator $faker) {
    return [
        'name' => $faker->name,
        'body' => $faker->paragraph(1),
        'user_id' => factory(App\User::class)->create()->id,
    ];
});

So now if you do this factory(App\Post::class, 4)->create() it will create 4 different posts and in the process also create 4 different users.

If you want the same user for all the posts what I usually do is:

$user = factory(App\User::class)->create();
$posts = factory(App\Posts::class, 40)->create(['user_id' => $user->id]);
1
  • 1
    Thanks for the response. I had been trying things like this. However, if I want to use the same set of Users for, let say, 20 other models, I feel that my seeders get muddled pretty quickly. Essentially, all of my seeding logic ends up happen in one file, because a 'User' is associated with so many other Models. But perhaps there isn't a better way
    – djt
    Feb 28, 2016 at 16:12
4

I want to share the approach i've taken for insert many posts to many users:`

factory(App\User::class, 50)->create() 
                ->each( 
                    function ($u) {
                        factory(App\Post::class, 10)->create()
                                ->each(
                                    function($p) use (&$u) { 
                                        $u->posts()->save($p)->make();
                                    }
                                );
                    }
                );

`

This workaround worked for me after being all day long looking for a way to seed the relationship

0

this worked for me in laravel v8

for ($i=0; $i<=2; $i++) {
    $user = \App\Models\User::factory(1)->create()->first();
    $product = \App\Models\Product::factory(1)->create(['user_id' => $user->id])->first();
}
1
  • 1
    Seems like a lot of pointless code. User::factory()->count(3)->hasProducts()->create(); does the same thing.
    – miken32
    Dec 31, 2021 at 16:09
0

I use a custom made relateOrCreate function that finds a random entry of that model in the database. If none exist, it creates a new one:

function relateOrCreate($class) {
    $instances = $class::all();
    $instance;

    if (count($instances) > 0) {
        $randomIndex = rand(0, (count($instances) - 1));
        $instance = $instances[$randomIndex];
    }
    else {
        $instance = $class::factory()->create();
    }

    return $instance;
}

Then I use it like so:

$relatedUser = relateOrCreate(User::class);

return [
    'user_id' => $relatedUser->id,
    // ...
];
1
  • 1
    It would make more sense to select a random row from the database, rather than selecting every single row from your database and then picking a random one. Also seems unnecessary since if you're seeding a database you know whether or not other records will exist.
    – miken32
    Dec 31, 2021 at 15:57

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