1

I've been reading about Java Concurrency in Swing, and cannot find a suitable answer to my situation.

Goal: To have my swing application run at the same time the while loop is until the program / application is quit.

Problem: The program freezes (as I anticipated beforehand) and cannot be used.

Attempted-Solution: I tried to start the while loop on another thread, started it, still nothing.

Code:

package stakeme;

import java.io.IOException;

import javax.swing.SwingUtilities;

public class StakeMeServer {

    private static ServerSocket socket;

    public static Thread t;


    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {


        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {
                new ConsoleGUI("Server", 800, 400, false);
            }

        });

        Thread t = new Thread(() -> {
            System.out.println("1");
            while (online) {
                System.out.println("2");
            }
        });
        t.setName("GameServer");
        t.start();
    }

}



Update: By using the SwingWorker class to do my while loop in the background, I was able to do almost what I needed to do.

Code:

package stakeme;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicBoolean;

import javax.swing.SwingUtilities;
import javax.swing.SwingWorker;
import javax.swing.UIManager;
import javax.swing.UnsupportedLookAndFeelException;

public class StakeMeServer {

    private static AtomicBoolean online = new AtomicBoolean(false);

    public static GameServerLoop gsl = new GameServerLoop();


    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {

        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {

                try {
                    UIManager.setLookAndFeel(UIManager.getSystemLookAndFeelClassName());
                } catch (ClassNotFoundException | InstantiationException | IllegalAccessException | UnsupportedLookAndFeelException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }

                new ConsoleGUI("Server", 800, 400, false);

            }

        });

        //this should always be running during the life of the program
        gsl.execute();

    }

    static class GameServerLoop extends SwingWorker<Void, Void> {

        @Override
        protected Void doInBackground() {
            System.out.println("1");
            while (true) {
                while (online.get()) {
                    System.out.println("2");
                }
            }
        }

    }

}



Everything works, to a fault. Running this at processing speeds (while loop) using the System.out.println() method will make the program some-what unresponsive. Clicking the stop button will work.. Eventually. It seems to be that everything is backed up because of the massive amount of System.out.println() calls.

  • import net.takeitfromacoder... For better help sooner, post a minimal reproducible example or Short, Self Contained, Correct Example. – Andrew Thompson Feb 17 '16 at 6:46
  • @AndrewThompson Thank you very much for the tip – PragmaticObject Feb 17 '16 at 6:49
  • See Concurrency in Swing for working examples. The examples would typically be based around either the Swing Timer or SwingWorker - the latter sounds more appropriate here. While everything time consuming should be 'off the EDT' (Event Dispatch Thread), ensure that any GUI updates are 'on the EDT'. – Andrew Thompson Feb 17 '16 at 6:49
  • Wait.. in the amended example, the open() method does not seem to be called at all. If it (and the close() method) is not used for the observed effect, they should be removed. – Andrew Thompson Feb 17 '16 at 6:56
  • @AndrewThompson So what are you referring to as the 'latter'. Also I have made sure there are no swing methods in other threads. I've been looking through the Concurrency in Swing for examples, but all of them are mainly for tasks that will be completed eventually. Where-as I need a while loop to do checks constantly. – PragmaticObject Feb 17 '16 at 6:59
6

So you incomplete example leaves a lot of questions unanswered, basically, something like this..

import java.awt.Color;
import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.EventQueue;
import java.awt.Graphics;
import java.awt.Graphics2D;
import java.awt.GridBagConstraints;
import java.awt.GridBagLayout;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.net.ServerSocket;
import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicBoolean;
import javax.swing.JButton;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JLabel;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import javax.swing.SwingUtilities;
import javax.swing.Timer;
import javax.swing.UIManager;
import javax.swing.UnsupportedLookAndFeelException;

public class StakeMeServer {

    private ServerSocket socket;
    private Thread t;
    private AtomicBoolean online = new AtomicBoolean(false);

    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
        new StakeMeServer();
    }

    public StakeMeServer() {

        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            try {
                UIManager.setLookAndFeel(UIManager.getSystemLookAndFeelClassName());
            } catch (ClassNotFoundException | InstantiationException | IllegalAccessException | UnsupportedLookAndFeelException ex) {
                ex.printStackTrace();
            }

            JFrame frame = new JFrame("Testing");
            frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
            frame.add(new TestPane());
            frame.pack();
            frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
            frame.setVisible(true);
        });

        open();

        Thread t = new Thread(() -> {
            System.out.println("1");
            while (online.get()) {
                System.out.println("2");
            }
        });
        t.setDaemon(true);
        t.setName("GameServer");
        t.start();
    }

    public void open() {
        System.out.println("Starting Server...");
        online.set(true);
        System.out.println("Server Online");
    }

    public void close() {
        System.out.println("Stopping Server...");
        online.set(false);
        System.out.println("Server Offline");
    }

    public class TestPane extends JPanel {

        private int x = 0;
        private int delta = 4;

        private JLabel state;

        public TestPane() {
            Timer timer = new Timer(40, new ActionListener() {
                @Override
                public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                    x += delta;
                    if (x + 10 > getWidth()) {
                        x = getWidth() - 10;
                        delta *= -1;
                    } else if (x < 0) {
                        x = 0;
                        delta *= -1;
                    }
                    state.setText(Boolean.toString(online.get()));
                    repaint();
                }
            });
            timer.start();

            setLayout(new GridBagLayout());
            GridBagConstraints gbc = new GridBagConstraints();
            gbc.gridwidth = GridBagConstraints.REMAINDER;

            state = new JLabel(Boolean.toString(online.get()));
            add(state, gbc);

            JButton btn = new JButton("Stop");
            btn.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
                @Override
                public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                    btn.setEnabled(false);
                    close();
                }
            });
            add(btn, gbc);
        }

        @Override
        public Dimension getPreferredSize() {
            return new Dimension(200, 200);
        }

        @Override
        protected void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
            super.paintComponent(g);
            Graphics2D g2d = (Graphics2D) g.create();
            g2d.setColor(Color.RED);
            g2d.fillOval(x, (getHeight() / 2) - 5, 10, 10);
            g2d.dispose();
        }

    }

}

works just fine.

I used an AtomicBoolean instead of boolean to prevent possible dirty read/writes between threads and made the Thread a daemon thread, so the application can close and the thread will not keep the JVM from terminating.

Personally, I'd lean towards using a SwingWorker, as it provides functionality which allow you to synchronize updates back to the UI simply

Take a look at Concurrency in Swing and Worker Threads and SwingWorker for more details

  • So why did you add the EventQueue.invokeLater() inside the SwingUtilities.invokeLater()? Is this due to the EDT? – PragmaticObject Feb 17 '16 at 19:31
  • No, that's a mistake, don't need the inner (SwingUtilities), they are both doing the same thing – MadProgrammer Feb 17 '16 at 20:17
  • So I attempted to work in the SwingWorker solution, I don't know if I did it correctly or if this is even a valid solution. There is still some unresponsiveness, but it could be related to all the System.out.println() calls – PragmaticObject Feb 18 '16 at 5:28
  • 1
    You have what's typically known as a "run away" thread, which is been allowed to run as fast as possible, which could be cause some issues with the thread scheduling, but the unresponsiveness could have something to do with what you're doing in the UI itself – MadProgrammer Feb 18 '16 at 5:40
  • Is there anyway for me to show you the UI without posting it here? It's quite "long". Although I am redirecting the output and error stream. Also, if I'm not going to be printing that much information that fast, should I even worry about this unresponsiveness? – PragmaticObject Feb 18 '16 at 6:02

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