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Here, I am passing an array of bits to some other function. Since, array size is too large, it throws an error saying "data segment too large" while compiling.

I have newly edited the code. But, the error: data segment too large still exists

This is the code:

char TxBits[]={0,1,0,1,0,1,0,1,0,1,0,1,0,1,0,1,0,1,0,1,0,1,0,1,     
               0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,
               0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,1,0,1,0,1,1,0,1,1,0,1,1,1,0,
               0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,1,0,0,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,1,0,1,
               0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,
               0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0};

 int nTxBits = sizeof(TxBits)/sizeof(char);

void data(char *TxBits,int nTxBits, int loopcount)
{

  int i;

  for (i = 0;i < nTxBits;i++)
  {

    gpio=TxBits[i];    
    wait(loopcount);
  }

}

So, I am thinking of converting bits in an array to bytes and passing to function. May I know how to proceed? open to suggestions. Kindly reply

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  • 3
    void data(char TxBits) { => void data(char[] TxBits) {. And i < nTxBits won't work.
    – pzaenger
    Feb 17, 2016 at 7:41
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    Is data segment too large the exact error message ? Because you have indeed an error in your code (void data(char TxBits) shoud be void data(char *TxBits)), but the message suggests a problem of memory model (small or tiny) that old MS/DOS compilers like TurboC++ used to issue. Feb 17, 2016 at 7:57
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    And C and C++ are different languages, so please choose your own (here my advice would be C) or explain why the question concerns both. Feb 17, 2016 at 7:58
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    @sss At this point we need to know, at least: What paltform? Which compiler?
    – LPs
    Feb 17, 2016 at 8:20
  • 2
    Using C++ on a 8051 core is like trying to squeeze a dull elephant into a rusty Lada from the 1980. Just my personal opinion of course.
    – Lundin
    Feb 17, 2016 at 8:56

5 Answers 5

2

From your code I reckon you're working with some micro-controller so I'm not sure if you're serious about the C++ tag or not. If you are, this is a C++-style solution which uses std::bitset (specialised container for dealing with bits which will require less space):

std::bitset<134> foo (std::string("01010101010101010101010100101010101010101010101010010101010101010101010101001010101010101010101010100101010101010101010101010100000000"));

void data(const std::bitset& bitset, int loopcount) {
  // if C++11 
  for (auto& bit : foo) {
    gpio = bit;
    wait(loopcount);
  }

  // if C++98
  // for (int i = 0; i<bitset.size(); i++) {
  //   gpio = foo[i];
  //   wait(loopcount);
  // }
}
1

You probably need this:

void data(char *TxBits, int size)  // size of the number of elements of your table
{
  int i;

  for (i = 0;i < size; i++)
  {
    gpio=TxBits[i];    
    wait(loopcount);
  }
}

Calling the function

data(TxBits, sizeof(TxBits) / sizeof(TxBits[0]);

To get the number of elements of an array we use sizeof(TxBits) / sizeof(TxBits[0] where sizeof(TxBits) is the number of bytes the array takes in memory and sizeof(TxBits[0] is the size of one element of the array.

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  • Do I understand correctly that the OP incorporated your suggestions in his post now with the last edit? I.e. if his problem persists, this does not solve it. Feb 17, 2016 at 8:17
  • @PeterA.Schneider it seem so. But anyway the OP's original code was clearly wrong anyway. Feb 17, 2016 at 8:19
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I am passing an array of bits to some other function

No, you are passing an array of bytes, each byte having the binary value 00000000 or 00000001.

In order to save memory, you should store bit values as actual bits and not as bytes:

uint8_t TxBits[]=
{  0x55, // 0,1,0,1,0,1,0,1,
   0x55, // 0,1,0,1,0,1,0,1,
   0x55, // 0,1,0,1,0,1,0,1,
   0x00, // 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,
   0x20, // 0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,
   ...
};

size_t nTxBits = sizeof(TxBits) / 8;

You should also avoid the char type whenever doing arithmetic, since it has implementation-defined signedness.

Also if this is a small microcontroller system, you should allocate the data in ROM instead of RAM whenever possible. That is: const uint8_t TxBits[].

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  • so having changed the TxBits array as above, I need to transmit each bit inside a byte with MSB as first to Data Tx() function. Can you let me know how to proceed?
    – sss
    Feb 18, 2016 at 6:47
  • @sss Study binary and hex numbers to begin with. IMO everyone should be doing that before even considering to take on programming.
    – Lundin
    Feb 18, 2016 at 7:16
0

Your Parameter is not declared correctly. Replace this:

void data(char TxBits)

by this

void data(char [] TxBits)
0
0

Your function

void data(char TxBits)

Should be

void data(char *TxBits, size_t nTxBits)
{
    int i;

    for (i = 0;i < nTxBits;i++)
    {
        gpio=TxBits[i];    
        wait(loopcount);
    }
}

You can call it by:

data ( TxBits, sizeof(TxBits)/sizeof(TxBits[0]) );

In this specific case, you have a char array, and you can also write:

data (TxBits, sizeof(TxBits));
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  • I have edited the code according to the comments. Still, the error persists
    – sss
    Feb 17, 2016 at 8:13
  • @sss what is your platform? Try to change char TxBits[] to const char TxBits[]
    – LPs
    Feb 17, 2016 at 8:16
  • I am using Silicon labs IDE for embedded application
    – sss
    Feb 17, 2016 at 8:20
  • @sss ok, but which MCU? How much RAM? I'm guessing you finished your space to allocate the whole array...
    – LPs
    Feb 17, 2016 at 8:21
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    @sss I think the proper solution is to laugh Silabs in the face everytime they try to peddle you some 1980s technology. But even Silabs have ARM cores nowadays, there should be no reason for you to use that old crap.
    – Lundin
    Feb 17, 2016 at 8:50

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