-1

I am doing a reduction within warps as follows:

__global__ void summation1(double *nBodies)
{

    ...

    for (int offset = warpSize/2; offset > 0; offset /= 2) {
        elements.x += __shfl_down(elements.x, offset);
    }

    ...

}

The above is working fine. I then took that code and put it in a function like this:

__inline__ __device__
double warpReduceSum(double val) {
    for (int offset = warpSize/2; offset > 0; offset /= 2) {
        val += __shfl_down(val, offset);
    }
        return val;
}

__global__ void summation1(double *nBodies)
{

    ...

    warpReduceSum(elements.x);

    ...

}

However, the above is not working - I'm not getting a sum back, just the original values. Any ideas on why this might be happening would be much appreciated.

3

warp shuffle operations do not work on 64-bit quantities. Refer to the documentation. For example:

Types other than int or float must first be cast in order to use the __shfl() intrinsics.

But based on the comments you are using an undocumented function in the CUDA headers. I believe it should work.

After further consideration, I think the issue you are running into is one of pass-by-value. For this function definition:

__inline__ __device__
double warpReduceSum(double val) {
    for (int offset = warpSize/2; offset > 0; offset /= 2) {
        val += __shfl_down(val, offset);
    }
        return val;
}

You are passing val by value to the function, so the function has its own local copy of that value. You then go about warp reduction. However in your main code, you are ignoring the return value:

warpReduceSum(elements.x);

and the actual shuffled values are not actually elements.x, but some copy of it.

The fix might be as simple as:

elements.x = warpReduceSum(elements.x);

You could also try passing the quantity by reference:

double warpReduceSum(double &val) {

I've tested both of these suggestions. Either one seems to work for my test case.

Note that SO expects a complete code for questions seeking debugging help. From here

Questions seeking debugging help ("why isn't this code working?") must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers. See: How to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example.

So if the above suggestions are not helpful (i.e. before you come back and say "I made that change, it didn't work"), I would suggest a complete code demonstrating the issue is in order.

| improve this answer | |
  • I found this function in /usr/local/cuda-6.5/targets/x86_64-linux/include/sm_30_intrinsics.h: – Too-Ticky Feb 17 '16 at 15:22
  • static device inline double __shfl_down(double var, unsigned int delta, int width=warpSize) { float lo, hi; asm volatile("mov.b64 {%0,%1}, %2;" : "=f"(lo), "=f"(hi) : "d"(var)); hi = __shfl_down(hi, delta, width); lo = __shfl_down(lo, delta, width); asm volatile("mov.b64 %0, {%1,%2};" : "=d"(var) : "f"(lo), "f"(hi)); return var; } – Too-Ticky Feb 17 '16 at 15:22
  • Yes, it's undocumented, but I think it should be usable. My answer was not correct. I've modified it. – Robert Crovella Feb 17 '16 at 16:19
  • Ah, of course. Silly mistake on my part, sorry. It is working now. Thanks for your answer! – Too-Ticky Feb 17 '16 at 16:27
  • 1
    If you use an undocumented function, there is always the possibility that it might be removed (essentially without notice) or modified in a future CUDA release, thus possibly breaking any codes that use it. This seems unlikely to me, but I feel obligated to mention it. (Such a disclaimer is possible even with documented functions, but in that case I would say that a possible removal is even less likely, and it almost certainly would carry some sort of advance notice of deprecation.) – Robert Crovella Feb 17 '16 at 16:31

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