6

I read in https://www.hackingwithswift.com/read/35/2/generating-random-numbers-in-ios-8-and-earlier that the best way to generate a random number is to use

    let r = arc4random_uniform(UInt32(_names.count))
    let name : String = _names[Int(r)]

but it seems odd that I have to cast twice to be able to get a random number, what should I do to avoid casting?

  • @TroyT: Actually there is no casting involved in this code. The OP is just creating a UInt32 from an Int value. – Luca Angeletti Feb 18 '16 at 1:23
  • @TroyT: take a look at my extension. It does add an initializer to Int that receives a range and generates an Int within that range. – Luca Angeletti Feb 18 '16 at 1:29
  • 1
    @appzYourLife I upvoted :) Much more reusable than my answer. – tktsubota Feb 18 '16 at 1:33
  • 3
    It's not odd, it's type safe. Big difference. – Sulthan Feb 18 '16 at 2:51
7

It really depends on how much casting you want to avoid. You could simply wrap it in a function:

func random(max maxNumber: Int) -> Int {
    return Int(arc4random_uniform(UInt32(maxNumber)))
}

So then you only have to do the ugly casting once. Everywhere you want a random number with a maximum number:

let r = random(max: _names.count)
let name: String = _names[r]

As a side note, since this is Swift, your properties don't need _ in front of them.

  • Your random() function does not compile. You have to cast the return value of arc4random_uniform(). – Martin R Feb 18 '16 at 0:46
  • @MartinR Whoops, I'll fix that. – tktsubota Feb 18 '16 at 0:47
3

I really like using this extension

extension Int {
    init(random range: Range<Int>) {

        let offset: Int
        if range.startIndex < 0 {
            offset = abs(range.startIndex)
        } else {
            offset = 0
        }

        let min = UInt32(range.startIndex + offset)
        let max = UInt32(range.endIndex   + offset)

        self = Int(min + arc4random_uniform(max - min)) - offset
    }
}

Now you can generate a random Int indicating the range

let a = Int(random: 1...10) // 3
let b = Int(random: 0..<10) // 6
let c = Int(random: 0...100) // 31
let d = Int(random: -10...3) // -4
1

you can use gameplaykit

let random = GKRandomDistribution(lowestValue: 0, highestValue: 100)
let r = random.nextInt()
  • 1
    It depends on the usage, Apple docs state: The randomization services provided in GameplayKit are suitable for reliably creating deterministic, pseudorandom gameplay mechanics, but are not cryptographically robust. For cryptography, obfuscation, or cipher uses, use the Security framework, described in Cryptographic Services Guide. arc4random() and arc4random_uniform() are cryptographically robust. – zaph Feb 18 '16 at 0:36
1

Modified answer from Luca written as extension in Swift 4

/// Returns random number within given range, upper bound included, eg. -1...0 = [-1, 0, 1]
extension CountableClosedRange where Bound == Int
{
    var random: Int
    {
        let range = self
        let offset: Int = range.lowerBound < 0 ? abs(range.lowerBound) : 0
        let min = UInt32(range.lowerBound + offset)
        let max = UInt32(range.upperBound + offset)
        let randomNumber = Int(min + arc4random_uniform(max - min + 1)) - offset

        return randomNumber
    }
}

/// Returns random number within given range, upper bound not included, eg. -1...0 = [-1, 0]
extension CountableRange where Bound == Int
{
    var random: Int
    {
        let range = self
        let offset: Int = range.lowerBound < 0 ? abs(range.lowerBound) : 0
        let min = UInt32(range.lowerBound + offset)
        let max = UInt32(range.upperBound + offset)
        let randomNumber = Int(min + arc4random_uniform(max - min)) - offset

        return randomNumber
    }
}

Examples:

(0...10).random
(0..<10).random
0

Or you could use

 let name : String = _names[ Int(arc4random()) % _names.count ]
  • No, use arc4random_uniform to avoid modulo bias. – zaph Feb 18 '16 at 0:18
  • The OP is selecting a name out of a list. This hardly qualifies as a valid scenario where modulo bias can make any relevant difference. With 4096 names in the list, the bias would be 0.000096 % on half of the entries – Alain T. Feb 18 '16 at 13:03
  • Why is it better to use arc4random() than arc4random_uniform(). The question is about casting with arc4random_uniform? – zaph Feb 18 '16 at 13:45
  • It's not better it's just shorter to write, and as such it is a viable alternative given the OP's objective. – Alain T. Feb 18 '16 at 18:29
  • 1
    One does not compromise correctness for "shorter to write", writing code is what we do, when writing code and we should not settle for worse code (even a little bit) to save typing UInt32(). Perhaps that is why we are not truly professionals yet, we are to lazy or do not care enough to type eight additional characters. – zaph Feb 18 '16 at 19:04

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