53

Say I put my code under src and tests under spec:

+ spec
+ --- classA.spec.ts
+ src
+ --- classA.ts
+ --- classB.ts
+ --- index.ts
+ tsconfig.json

I want to only transpile src to the dist folder. Since index.ts is the entry point of my package, my tsconfig.json look like this:

{
  "compileOptions": {
    "module": "commonjs"
    "outDir": "dist"
  },
  "files": {
    "src/index.ts",
    "typings/main.d.ts"
  }
}

However, this tsconfig.json does not include the test files so I could not resolve dependencies in them.

On the other hand, if I include the test files into tsconfig.json then they are also transpiled to dist folder.

How do I solve this problem?

41

I ended up defining multiple config files and use extends to simplify them.

Say I have two files: tsconfig.json and tsconfig.build.json

// tsconfig.json
{
  ...
  "exclude": [...]
}

// tsconfig.build.json
{
  ...
  "files": [ "typings/index.d.ts", "src/index.ts" ]
}

This way, I can have fine control on what to build (using tsc -p tsconfig.build.json) and what the ts language service (IDE) handles.

UPDATE: now as my projects grow, I ended up having more config files. I use the "extend" feature that is now available in TypeScript:

// tsconfig.base.json
{
  // your common settings. Mostly "compilerOptions".
  // Do not include "files" and "include" here,
  // let individual config handles that.
  // You can use "exclude" here, but with "include",
  // It's pretty much not necessary.
}

// tsconfig.json
{
  // This is used by `ts language service` and testing.
  // Includes source and test files.
  "extends": "./tsconfig.base.json",
  "atom": { ... },
  "compilerOptions": {
    // I set outDir to place all test build in one place,
    // and avoid accidentally running `tsc` littering test build to my `src` folder.
    "outDir": "out/spec"  
  }
  "include": [ ... ]
}

// tsconfig.commonjs.json or tsconfig.systemjs.json or tsconfig.global.json etc
{
  "extends": "./tsconfig.base.json",
  "compilerOptions": {
    // for some build this does not apply
    "declaration": true/false,
    "outDir": "dist/<cjs, sys, global, etc>",
    "sourceRoot": "..."
  },
  // Only point to typings and the start of your source, e.g. `src/index.ts`
  "files": [ ... ],
  "include": [ ... ]
 }
8

This is somewhat dependent on whatever testing framework you're using but I like to use ts-node to compile my test files. Using mocha, your npm test script might look like:

"mocha": "mocha test/ --compilers ts:ts-node/register --recursive"

In your tsconfig.json, make sure to remove the rootDir option.

{
    "compilerOptions": {
        "module": "commonjs",
        "target": "es6",
        "noImplicitAny": false,
        "removeComments": true,
        "sourceMap": true,
        "outDir": "lib"
    },
    "include": [
        "src/**/*.ts"
    ],
    "exclude": [
        "node_modules",
        "lib",
        "typings/**"
    ]
}

When you try to run typescript with rootDir set to src or whatever the base folder for your application code is, it'll disallow any compilation in a directory that sits outside, such a tests. Using ts-node, you can easily keep everything separate without having to have separate TypeScript configuration files.

  • 2
    Not separating into multiple config files has the drawback of distributing extra (test) files in the package. Also, your two include are redundant. You only need src/**/*.ts – unional Dec 12 '16 at 6:34
4

I think you should not use 'files' option in your config. Instead you can exclude unwanted files and have it like this:

{ 
    "compilerOptions": { 
        "module": "commonjs", 
        "outDir": "dist"
    },
    "exclude": [
        "node_modules",
        "dist",
        "typings/browser.d.ts",
        "typings/browser/**"
    ]
} 

This will preserve your original structure in the 'dist' folder without mixing tests and app js files:

--dist
----spec
-------....
----src
-------....
  • 4
    But he doesn't want the test files to end up in the dist folder at all. Which is logical, they are not for publication. Having them in a subdir there does not really help. I too want my project files and only those end up in lib/, and the files under test/ remain where they are. If the .js version of the test files is moved somewhere else I would have two new problems: a) Exclude them from publication, b) have test runners find them, sure solvable, but it piles hack on top of hack. Unnecessary if tsc could just store the test files in the test directory. – Mörre May 7 '19 at 10:57
0

Here is a detailed solution to manage sources and tests:

  • compilation includes sources and tests folders/files
  • build includes only sources
  • IDE (VSCode, ...)

Config

The solution is based on 2 tsconfig.ts files as mentioned in other answers.

The main ./tsconfig.ts (used for compilation and IDE):

{
  "compileOptions": {
    "module": "commonjs"
    "outDir": "dist"
  },
  "include": [
    "spec/**/*. spec.ts"
  ],
  "files": {
    "src/index.ts",
  }
}

The second ./tsconfig-build.ts (used for build):

{
  "extends": "./tsconfig.json",
  "exclude": [
    "spec/**/*. spec.ts"
  ]
}

Note: we exclude test files that have been included previously

Build

Build command: tsc -p tsconfig-build.json

Or npm run build if script is added in package.json:

{
  "scripts": {
    "build": "tsc -p tsconfig-build.json",
}

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