5

I have created a .NET library compiled by LabVIEW which has a function that takes an array of numbers and a multiplicand. This function will return an array where each number has been multiplied with the multiplicand. When the function is called in C#, it turns out that the function takes a non-zero indexed array (double[*]) and an int as the parameters and return another non-zero indexed array.

I'm able to create a non-zero indexed array with C#'s Array.CreateInstance() method. However I'm not able to pass this array into the function since the data type required is double[*].

From the research on the internet, it seems like .NET does not support non-zero indexed array type. I've tried to find a way to modify the LabVIEW program to generate the function that takes in a zero-indexed array without avail.

Any advice on how I can go around this issue?

Update 1

LabVIEW block diagram LabVIEW block diagram

C# Program

const int Length = 5;
const int LowerBound = 1;
// Instanstiate a non-zero indexed array. The array is one-dimensional and
// has size specified by Length and lower bound specified by LowerBound.
Array numbers = Array.CreateInstance(typeof(double), new int[] { Length }, new int[] { LowerBound });
// Initialize the array.
for (int i = numbers.GetLowerBound(0); i <= numbers.GetUpperBound(0); i++)
{
    numbers.SetValue(i, i);
}

var variable = LabVIEWExports.Multiply(numbers, 2); // This is invalid as numbers is not typed double[*].
Console.ReadKey();

Signature of the LabVIEW function in C#

enter image description here

Update 2

Tried to use C#'s Reflection to call the LabVIEW function with the following codes, but encounter TargetInvocationException.

const int Length = 5;
const int LowerBound = 1;
const string methodName = "MultiplyArray";
const string path = @"C:\";

Array numbers = Array.CreateInstance(typeof(double), new int[] { Length }, new int[] { LowerBound });
for (int i = numbers.GetLowerBound(0); i <= numbers.GetUpperBound(0); i++)
{
    numbers.SetValue(i, i);
}

Assembly asm = Assembly.LoadFile(path + "LabVIEW.Interop.dll");
Type type = asm.GetType("LabVIEW.Interop.LabVIEWInteropExports");

if (type != null)
{
    MethodInfo methodInfo = type.GetMethod(methodName);

    if (methodInfo != null)
    {
        object result = methodInfo.Invoke(methodInfo, new object[] { array, multiplicand }); // Throw exception.
    }
}
Console.ReadKey();

Inner exception message

Unable to cast object of type 'System.Double[*]' to type 'System.Double[]'.

Inner exception stack trace

at NationalInstruments.LabVIEW.Interop.DataMarshal.InitMarshalArrayIn(IntPtr data, Array array, Marshal1DArray val) at LabVIEW.Interop.LabVIEWInteropExports.MultiplyArray(Double[*] input__32Array, Int32 numeric)

It seems like at some point of the execution, the program tries to marshal the type double[*] to double[] with InitMarshalArrayIn() function in the assembly that comes with LabVIEW.

10
  • @Nishat: please don't use code blocks for non-code... Feb 18, 2016 at 9:22
  • 1
    .NET does support arrays that are non-zero indexes. C# has no syntax to write such a type but you can create it using Array.Create* and pass it using reflection.
    – usr
    Feb 18, 2016 at 9:24
  • Did you mean double*[]? What do you mean by double[*]? Feb 18, 2016 at 9:37
  • Check the parameter ElementType you can do typeof(yourRequiredType) Feb 18, 2016 at 9:56
  • 1
    @MathuSumMut, double[*] is a non-zero indexed array of type double. social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/… Feb 18, 2016 at 10:20

3 Answers 3

3

I'm not sure whether i should put this as answer or not, but here it goes:

It happens that this is an issue related to Visual Studio 2015 as I'm using Visual Studio Community 2015 Update 1. See this and this for more info.

3

.NET does support arrays that are non-zero indexes. C# has no syntax to write such a type but you can create it using Array.CreateInstance.

Next, use reflection to call LabVIEWExports.Multiply and pass the array that you created.

1
  • Tried using reflection to call LabVIEWExports.Multiply (see Update 2 in the question), but encounter exception. I'm not too sure whether I'm doing it wrong, or it just simply because of LabVIEW itself does not support the casting from double[*] to double[]? Feb 19, 2016 at 1:51
1

Will it work if you use dynamic (rather than resorting to reflection), as in the last line of:

const int Length = 5;
const int LowerBound = 1;
// Instanstiate a non-zero indexed array. The array is one-dimensional and
// has size specified by Length and lower bound specified by LowerBound.
var numbers = Array.CreateInstance(typeof(double), new int[] { Length }, new int[] { LowerBound });
// Initialize the array.
for (int i = numbers.GetLowerBound(0); i <= numbers.GetUpperBound(0); i++)
{
    numbers.SetValue(i, i);
}

var variable = (Array)LabVIEWExports.Multiply((dynamic)numbers, 2);

The variable numbers has compile-time type Array to C# since C# does not have a syntax for double[*]. But maybe it will be OK with dynamic where the actual type of numbers at run-time should be correct, so maybe late binding to the correct method will work?

6
  • Does not work for me. It throws System.InvalidCastException during runtime. Feb 19, 2016 at 10:43
  • @NoctisTong OK. I do not have VS2015 with its new C# compiler, and I do not have CLR version 4.6, but maybe it is the same problem as you see when you use reflection (update 2 in your question)? From the pages you link I get the impression that it used to work with VS2013 etc. Feb 19, 2016 at 11:22
  • @Jeppee, I've tried to call the same assembly generated by the LabVIEW from VS 2010 and it works. Seems like it is a VS issue rather than a LabVIEW issue. Feb 22, 2016 at 1:41
  • @NoctisTong Was it on the same machine? I ask because it is interesting to know if it is a problem with the IL generated by the C# compiler, or a problem with the CLR (runtime). In the first case, it could be the C# compiler which outputs some wrong IL code forcing a check that a double[*] (otherwise known as double[...]) cannot pass. In the second case, it could be a bug in the version 4.6 runtime. Have you tried changing the C# target version to C# 5.0 within Visual Studio 2015, as in this post? Feb 22, 2016 at 11:24
  • 1
    @NoctisTong My hypothesis, then, is that this is a bug in the C# compiler of VS2015 which does not go away even if we target earlier C# versions (and still use the VS2015 C# compiler). You could open ildasm and open the EXE/DLL produced by VS2015, browse to the method in question, and read the IL to see if it mentions float64[] or similar (which will crash since the instance is not a "vector" float64[] but instead a "multi-dimensional array of rank one" float64[...]). Feb 23, 2016 at 9:17

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.