9

I have this class:

public abstract class Addressable {

  abstract <T extends "this" Addressable> void hardEquals(T t);

}

The method hardEquals(T t) is not bounded as I want. What I want is bound T to be same class of this. In other words when I extend the class Addressable, with the concrete class MyAddressable, I want that the method hardEquals() has the signature:

void hardEquals(MyAddressable t);

For completeness:

public class MyAddressable extends Addressable {

  void hardEquals(MyAddressable t);

}
  1. Is it possible to achieve what I want?
  2. If the answer is no, is it so stupid my class constraint?
  • This cannot be properly done, because this means that MyAddressable suddenly gets a method that accepts a Addressable instead of the other type, that the class in't prepared to handle, a "this" type, if existed, can only be used in a context like ? extends this, like the signature of getClass() shows it. – Ferrybig Feb 18 '16 at 9:52
2

It’s not possible in general. The problem becomes clear when think a bit longer about your scenario. You have that class Addressable and its method hardEquals which demands that its parameter has the type equal to this. Then you have the subclass

public class MyAddressable extends Addressable {
  void hardEquals(MyAddressable t);
}

that seems to work as intended. Now imagine a subclass of the subclass:

public class GrandChild extends MyAddressable {
  void hardEquals(MyAddressable t);
}

Here, you have a class which must accept MyAddressable as hardEquals’ parameter as it is not allowed to override a method by narrowing the parameter types, i.e. not accepting things that the superclass accepted. After all, you can always have a variable of type MyAddressable that actually refers to an instance of GrandChild. It would be impossible to restrict the parameters to hardEquals to match the actual runtime type of the object.

So the desired “parameter type must match this type” rule conflicts with the “subclass methods must accept all parameters the superclass did” rule.


Note that this is often confused with an actual limitation of the type system, that the same thing doesn’t work for return types. Since return types are allowed to be narrowed for subclasses, the desire to guaranty to return the this type could be reasonable in some scenarios, e.g.:

class Base {
    Base/*actually this type*/ clone() { … }
}
class SubClass extends Base {
    SubClass/*actually this type*/ clone() { … }
}
class GrandChild extends SubClass {
    GrandChild/*actually this type*/ clone() { … }
}

works, but there is no formal way to specify the guaranty that the this type is returned so it’s up to the programmer’s discipline to add the correct override to every subclass.

But, as said, for parameter types this doesn’t work in general as you can’t narrow the type of a parameter in a subclass.

1

You could borrow a trick from Comparable, and specify the generic type in the class declaration itself:

public abstract class Addressable<T> {
    abstract <T> void hardEquals(T t);
}

This results in slightly clunky class definitions, but it should fulfill your requirement

public class HomeAddress extends Addressable<HomeAddress> {
    void hardEquals(HomeAddress t) {
        // implementation
    }
}
1

I'm not aware of a clean solution for your problem.

You could think about something like this:

public abstract class Addressable<T extends Addressable<T>> {

  abstract void hardEquals(T other);

}

public class MyAddressable extends Addressable<MyAddressable> {

  @Override
  void hardEquals(MyAddressable other) {
    // ...
  }

}

But this could fail in some cases, e.g.:

public class FakeAddressable extends Addressable<MyAddressable> {

  @Override
  void hardEquals(MyAddressable aT) {
    // ...
  }

}
1

If you are looking for a hardEquals that can only be used with objects with exactly the same type then something like this should work:

public abstract class Addressable<T extends Addressable<T>> {

    abstract boolean hardEquals(T t);

}

class X extends Addressable<X> {

    @Override
    boolean hardEquals(X t) {
        return true;
    }

}

class Y extends Addressable<Y> {

    @Override
    boolean hardEquals(Y t) {
        return true;
    }

}

public void test() {
    X x = new X();
    if ( x.hardEquals(x)) {
        System.out.println("Ok");
    }
    Y y = new Y();
    // Fails!
    if ( x.hardEquals(y)) {
        System.out.println("Not OK");
    }
}

As @Holger rightly points out - this does not help when extending the sub-classes.

  • 1
    But now think about subclasses of Y – Holger Feb 18 '16 at 10:20

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.