2

I am learning, trying to get thoughts behind CRC. I can't find CRC128 and CRC256 code anywhere. If anyone of you have the C++ or C# Code for them, please share them with me. Also provide online links to the websites. I am a newbie and can't code it by myself at all, neither can convert theories and mathematics to the coding. So I ask for help from you. It will be so nice of you who provide me the proper and simple codes. If anyone provides me these codes, please do also provide CRC Table generator functions. Thank you.

3

Though CRC-128 and CRC-256 were defined, I don't know of anyone who actually uses them.

Most of the time, developers who think they want a CRC should really be using a cryptographic hash function, which have succeeded CRCs for many applications. It would be a rare case indeed where CRC-128 or CRC-256 would be a superior choice to even the broken MD5, much less the SHA-2 family.

2
  • 2
    Wikipedia even calls CRC-128 and CRC-256 "technologically defunct": en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… – Thomas Owens Aug 23 '10 at 18:43
  • One advantage CRC-128 has over MD5 - if you use MD5, some security audit or scanning tool is going to flag it as a security risk. At best, you have to spend time convincing people there is no security risk in using MD5 in your particular use case; you may lose the argument and be told to replace it with something “more secure”. By contrast, use of CRC128 is unlikely to be flagged in any security scan or audit, because there is no history of using it for security purposes. – Simon Kissane Aug 7 '20 at 23:11
3

Here is a Java class I wrote recently for playing with CRCs. Beware that changing the bit order is implemented only for bitwise computation.

/**
 * A CRC algorithm for computing check values.
 */
public class Crc
{
public static final Crc CRC_16_CCITT =
    new Crc(16, 0x1021, 0xffff, 0xffff, true);
public static final Crc CRC_32 =
    new Crc(32, 0x04c11db7, 0xffffffffL, 0xffffffffL, true);


private final int _width;
private final long _polynomial;
private final long _mask;
private final long _highBitMask;
private final long _preset;
private final long _postComplementMask;
private final boolean _msbFirstBitOrder;
private final int _shift;

private final long[] _crcs;



/**
 * Constructs a CRC specification.
 *
 * @param width
 * @param polynomial
 * @param msbFirstBitOrder
 */
public Crc(
    int width,
    long polynomial)
{
    this(width, polynomial, 0, 0, true);
}


/**
 * Constructs a CRC specification.
 *
 * @param width
 * @param polynomial
 * @param msbFirstBitOrder
 */
public Crc(
    int width,
    long polynomial,
    long preset,
    long postComplementMask,
    boolean msbFirstBitOrder)
{
    super();
    _width = width;
    _polynomial = polynomial;
    _mask = (1L << width) - 1;
    _highBitMask = (1L << (width - 1));
    _preset = preset;
    _postComplementMask = postComplementMask;
    _msbFirstBitOrder = msbFirstBitOrder;
    _shift = _width - 8;

    _crcs = new long[256];
    for (int i = 0; i < 256; i++)
    {
        _crcs[i] = crcForByte(i);
    }
}


/**
 * Gets the width.
 *
 * @return  The width.
 */
public int getWidth()
{
    return _width;
}


/**
 * Gets the polynomial.
 *
 * @return  The polynomial.
 */
public long getPolynomial()
{
    return _polynomial;
}


/**
 * Gets the mask.
 *
 * @return  The mask.
 */
public long getMask()
{
    return _mask;
}


/**
 * Gets the preset.
 *
 * @return  The preset.
 */
public long getPreset()
{
    return _preset;
}


/**
 * Gets the post-complement mask.
 *
 * @return  The post-complement mask.
 */
public long getPostComplementMask()
{
    return _postComplementMask;
}


/**
 * @return  True if this CRC uses MSB first bit order.
 */
public boolean isMsbFirstBitOrder()
{
    return _msbFirstBitOrder;
}


public long computeBitwise(byte[] message)
{
    long result = _preset;

    for (int i = 0; i < message.length; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < 8; j++)
        {
            final int bitIndex = _msbFirstBitOrder ? 7 - j : j;
            final boolean messageBit = (message[i] & (1 << bitIndex)) != 0;
            final boolean crcBit = (result & _highBitMask) != 0;

            result <<= 1;
            if (messageBit ^ crcBit)
            {
                result ^= _polynomial;
            }
            result &= _mask;
        }
    }

    return result ^ _postComplementMask;
}


public long compute(byte[] message)
{
    long result = _preset;

    for (int i = 0; i < message.length; i++)
    {
        final int b = (int) (message[i] ^ (result >>> _shift)) & 0xff;

        result = ((result << 8) ^ _crcs[b]) & _mask;
    }
    return result ^ _postComplementMask;
}


private long crcForByte(int b)
{
    long result1 = (b & 0xff) << _shift;
    for (int j = 0; j < 8; j++)
    {
        final boolean crcBit = (result1 & (1L << (_width - 1))) != 0;

        result1 <<= 1;
        if (crcBit)
        {
            result1 ^= _polynomial;
        }
        result1 &= _mask;
    }
    return result1;
}


public String crcTable()
{
    final int digits = (_width + 3) / 4;
    final int itemsPerLine = (digits + 4) * 8 < 72 ? 8 : 4;

    final String format = "0x%0" + digits + "x, ";

    final StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
    builder.append("{\n");
    for (int i = 0; i < _crcs.length; i += itemsPerLine)
    {
        builder.append("    ");
        for (int j = i; j < i + itemsPerLine; j++)
        {
            builder.append(String.format(format, _crcs[j]));
        }
        builder.append("\n");
    }
    builder.append("}\n");
    return builder.toString();
}
}
1
  • Thank for replying with this code. I need a proper C# compatible code for CRC128 or CRC256. – Tush Aug 24 '10 at 9:34
3

CRC-128 and CRC-256 only make sense if the three following point are true :

  1. You are CPU constrained to the point where a crypto hash would significantly slow you down
  2. Accidental collision must statistically never happen, 1 in 2^64 is still too high
  3. OTOH deliberate collisions are not a problem

A typical case where 2 and 3 can be true together is if an accidental collision would create a data loss that only affects the sender of the data, and not the platform.

2
  • 2
    A little known feature of CRC (only true CRCs, not other types of checksums) is that they have guaranteed burst error detection rates. E.g. a CRC-32 will always detect a single burst error of up to 32 bits. Not all bits need to be flipped, so this means as long as the first and last bad bit have only 30 other bits in between them, the error will be detected. Cryptographic hash functions generally give no such guarantee. (Actually, a CRC-r will even detect all r+1 bit burst errors except the one that is exactly equal to the underlying polynomial.) – Arne Vogel Jul 3 '19 at 12:49
  • 1
    @ArneVogel : Not really relevant, 2^128 may not seem huge, but it's basically something like the number of stars there is in the whole universe. So an accidental collision will never happen, even though it's not mathematically guaranteed not to happen. Also see the next comment by mccorb, as the output of the CRC isn't by far fully detached from the properties of the input data, it wouldn't be astonishing if datas with similar content structure were to collide much more frequently than theorically expected. – jmd Dec 19 '19 at 13:44
3

I agree with you except that the accidental collision rate is higher than 1 in 2^32 or 1 in 2^64 for 32 bit and 64 bit CRCs respectively.

I wrote an app that kept track of things by their CRC values for tracking items. We needed to track potentially millions of items and we started with a CRC32 which in real world practice has a collision rate of around 1 in 2^16 which was an unpleasant surprise. We then re-coded to use a CRC64 which had a real world collision rate of about 1 in 2^23. We tested this after the unpleasant surprise of the 32 bit one we started with and accepted the small error rate of the 64 bit one.

I can't really explain the statistics behind the expected collision rate but it makes sense that you would experience a collision much sooner that the width of the bits. Just like a hashtable...some hash buckets are empty and others have more than one entry....

Even for a 256 bit CRC the first 2 CRC's could be the same...it would be almost incredible but possible.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.