2

There is already a question for this here: How to repeat a string a variable number of times in C++? However because the question was poorly formulated primarily answers about character multiplication were given. There are two correct, but expensive answers, so I'll be sharpening the requirement here.


Perl provides the x operator: http://perldoc.perl.org/perlop.html#Multiplicative-Operators which would let me do this:

$foo = "0, " x $bar;

I understand that I can do this with the helper functions such as those in the other answer. I want to know can I do this without my own helper function? My preference would be something that I could initialize a const string with, but if I can't do that I'm pretty sure that this could be answered with a standard algorithm and a lambda.

  • 4
    "standard algorithm and a lambda" - how is that not a helper function? please clarify. what are you trying to achieve here? – Karoly Horvath Feb 19 '16 at 13:52
  • 1
    @KarolyHorvath I think these parts go together "do this without my own helper function" - "if I can't do that I'm pretty sure that this could be answered with a standard algorithm and a lambda" – James Adkison Feb 19 '16 at 13:53
  • 1
    Maybe op wants a custom multiplication operator for std::string? – Simon Kraemer Feb 19 '16 at 13:59
  • 1
    @KarolyHorvath Most of the linked answers are about repeating a single character. Only one is about repeating a complete string. I don't take any offense that my answers are "really ugly" and "needlessly complicated" but would you mind telling me what exactly bothers you about them? The linked answer is far more complicated. – Simon Kraemer Feb 19 '16 at 15:49
  • 2
    @KarolyHorvath I also agree that it is unecessary to use a lambda function when it is only used in one place. It would be far easier to just write the code in place. – Simon Kraemer Feb 19 '16 at 15:50
3

You can either override the multiplication operator

#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>


std::string operator*(const std::string& str, size_t times)
{
    std::stringstream stream;
    for (size_t i = 0; i < times; i++) stream << str;
    return stream.str();
}

int main() {
    std::string s = "Hello World!";
    size_t times = 5;

    std::string repeated = s * times;
    std::cout << repeated << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

... or use a lambda ...

#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>

int main() {
    std::string s = "Hello World!";
    size_t times = 5;

    std::string repeated = [](const std::string& str, size_t times) {std::stringstream stream; for (size_t i = 0; i < times; i++) stream << str; return stream.str(); } (s, times);
    std::cout << repeated << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

... or use a lambda with reference capturing ...

#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>

int main() {
    std::string s = "Hello World!";
    size_t times = 5;

    std::string repeated = [&s, &times]() {std::stringstream stream; for (size_t i = 0; i < times; i++) stream << str; return stream.str(); }();
    std::cout << repeated << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

Instead of using std::stringstream you could also use std::string in combination with std::string::reserve(size_t) as you already know (or can calculate) the size of the result string.

std::string repeated; repeated.reserve(str.size() * times);
for (size_t i = 0; i < times; i++) repeated.append(str);
return repeated;

This might be faster: Compare http://goo.gl/92hH9M with http://goo.gl/zkgK4T

0

It is possible to do this using just a standard algorithm and a lambda with generate_n, but it still cannot initialize a const string it needs to be done in a separate line:

string foo;
const auto bar = 13U;

generate_n(back_inserter(foo), bar * 3U, [](){
    static const char multiplicand[] = "0, ";
    static const auto length = strlen(multiplicand);
    static auto i = 0U;
    return multiplicand[i++ % length];});

I've created a live example here: http://ideone.com/uIt2Ee But as is probably been made plain by all the question comments, the requirement of doing this in a single line results in inferior code. Right off the bat, we can see that the bare constant, 3, represents the size of multiplicand and unnecessarily requires changes to the initialization of multiplicand to also update this literal.

The obvious improvement that should be made is:

string foo;
const auto bar = 13U;
const char multiplicand[] = "0, ";
const auto length = strlen(multiplicand);

generate_n(back_inserter(foo), bar * length, [&](){
    static auto i = 0U;
    return multiplicand[i++ % length];
});

The next improvement would be eliminating the reallocation as foo grows, which could be expensive if bar or length is large. That can be accomplished by constructing foo with sufficient space to contain the entire generated string:

const auto bar = 13U;
const char multiplicand[] = "0, ";
const auto length = strlen(multiplicand);
string foo(bar * length, '\0');

generate_n(foo.begin(), bar * length, [&](){
    static auto i = 0U;
    return multiplicand[i++ % length];
});

[Live Example]

  • string::reserve instead of the resize at construction would avoid to initialize foo twice. – Jarod42 Feb 23 '16 at 16:39
  • @Jarod42 Ummm... I don't call either reserve or resize. Are you talking about my construction argument that callocs foo: string foo(bar * length, '\0');? – Jonathan Mee Feb 23 '16 at 16:46
  • Yes, I talked about string foo(bar * length, '\0'). To be replaced by string foo; foo.reserve(bar * length);. – Jarod42 Feb 23 '16 at 17:05
  • @Jarod42 I'm not sure if I follow why it wouldn't be preferable to calloc this up front. Wouldn't that cause foo to be malloced and then realloced, since a string must always contain at least 1 char (the terminating NULL.) – Jonathan Mee Feb 23 '16 at 18:03
  • There is still small string optimization, so I expect only one allocation for reserve. – Jarod42 Feb 23 '16 at 18:19

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