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We develop a .NET application in Visual Studio 2013 which calls native C++ library.

The problem is that the app freeze after it is break from VS and continued from VS if native code debugging is not enabled and just my code disabled. The native library use extensively threads provided by C++11 and this native library is loaded in runtime by LoadLibrary function.

In more detail:

Debugger setting:

native code debugging: disabled
just my code:          enabled

When I break the debugger by pause button, the application breaks. Then I continue the execution by click the continue button in VS. The application freeze and not continue. Probably some native thread is still frozen by debugger?

Debugger setting:

native code debugging: enabled
just my code:          disabled

When I break the debugger by pause button, the application breaks. Then I continue the execution by click the continue button in VS. The application continue without any problem.

Debugger setting:

native code debugging: enabled
just my code:          enabled

When I break the debugger by pause button, the application breaks. Then I continue the execution by click the continue button in VS. The application continue without any problem.

How it is possible that the debugger settings cause freezing of application after break and continue?

Is there some difference which (managed and unmanaged) threads are paused based on debugger settings?

Can it happen that managed threads are paused and unmanaged still running when debugger is paused and native debugging is not enabled?

  • 2
    Threaded code often has latent race and deadlock bugs, the kind that don't strike until the timing at which code runs changes. Many possible triggers for such a timing change. Yes, a debugger break is one. A debugger can never suspend and resume all threads at the exact same time. Count your lucky stars that you discover them now instead of later, after you shipped it. That doesn't make it any easier to debug however, bummer that it doesn't trip with the unmanaged debugger enabled. Intentionally injecting random delays in the code might get you closer. – Hans Passant Feb 19 '16 at 15:41

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