3

Given the following, is it possible to access the parent context rather than the containers from a child (non-react component) element?

The example logs container, ideally it would log parent. I would like for Parent to be self contained, not to have it's state managed by its container.

var Container = React.createClass({
  getInitialState: function () {
    return {
      context: 'container'
    }
  },
  render: function () {
    return (
      <Parent>
        <a href="#" onClick={function () {console.log(this.state.context);}.bind(this)}>click me</a>
      </Parent>
    );
  }
});

var Parent= React.createClass({
  getInitialState: function () {
    return {
      context: 'parent'
    }
  },
  render: function () {
    return (
      <div>
        {this.props.children}
      </div>
    );
  }
});

If there is another pattern for handling this, please share as well.

Note: To be clear, I understand how the this keyword works and why the above example works as it does. The example is simply meant to illustrate the problem.

1

You can import some React helpers for that:

var React = require('react')

...
var children = React.Children.map(this.props.children, child => {
  return React.cloneElement(child, {
    context: this.state.context
  })
})

render() {
  return <div>{ children }</div>
}
...

Then your child component will have this.props.context which will be the string 'parent', but this must be a React component, as this needs to refer to the component using the parent prop

var YourComponent = React.createClass({
  render() {
     return (
       <a href="#" onClick={() => console.log(this.props.context)}>
         click me
       </a>
     )
   }
})

------

var Parent = require('./Parent')
var YourComponent = require('./YourComponent')

...

render() {
  return <Parent><YourComponent /></Parent>
}
9
  • Thanks, this is actually the path I went down as well but I couldn't get it to work. this.props... whatever still refers to the container. It could work if the child was another react component, but I'm not sure how to make it work in this case. It is possible I missed something.. could you create a working example?
    – aw04
    Feb 19 '16 at 16:26
  • There's no way that this.props could refer to container. Did you forget to change this.state.context to this.props.context ?
    – azium
    Feb 19 '16 at 16:36
  • 1
    Oh my apologies, I took a closer look at your problem, you are correct in your comment so i'll update my answer.
    – azium
    Feb 19 '16 at 16:44
  • Cool thanks for your help. I'm not thrilled with having to wrap something as simple as an anchor in a component (i wonder, is there a way to create the component dynamically in the parent instead?) or assigning something to each child rather than just use it where I want, but this will certainly work.
    – aw04
    Feb 19 '16 at 16:57
  • I'm going to leave the question open for now, but you have my upvote
    – aw04
    Feb 19 '16 at 16:58
0

I do not know about the first part of your question, but since you commented about dynamically creating components, here's how I do it:

You can set a state variable in the constructor of the class and its parent:

if (typeof this.state == 'undefined') {
  this.state = {
    componentsToRender: <div></div>
  };
}

Then in the parent component, in the componentDidMount() function:

var componentsToRender = [];
if ([conditional]) {
  // some logic so you know which component to render
  componentsToRender.push(<customChildComponentToRender key={} />);
}
else {
  componentsToRender.push(<otherComponentToRender key={} />);
}
this.setState({
  componentsToRender: <div>{componentsToRender}</div>
});

Make sure to put a key (lines 4 and 7 of the second code block) or React will scream at you.

In response to your initial question, I would watch this video from the ReactJS Conference 2015 to get more of the heart behind a container. After hearing what the guys at Facebook say (who have radical views on containers!), you might want to rethink the design to make your container more of a data layer.

0

I would check out THIS article from the react website. I think it might give you some intuition on solving your problem.

As a general rule of thumb, I try and only use this.state to handle internal UI state of a specific component. Everything else is passed via props. If you're needing the full context of a component, I would either pass it as a prop or checkout something like flux or redux which will help you manage state between components.

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