6

Is there a way to convert an arbitrary string to a valid filename in Javascript?

The result should stick as close to the original string as possible, to be easy for humans to read (therefore slugify is not an option). This means it needs only to replace characters which are not supported by an OS.

For example:

'Article: "Un éléphant à l\'orée du bois/An elephant at the edge of the woods".txt'
→ 'Article   Un éléphant à l\'orée du bois An elephant at the edge of the woods .txt'

I thought that this would be a common problem, but I haven't found any solutions to it. I hope you can help me!

2
  • first you'd have to know what the target OS is - there's no point in sanitizing for Windows, if it the file's going onto a Mac, and vice versa... Otherwise, you'd have to just go with the least common denominator a-z0-9\-
    – Marc B
    Commented Feb 19, 2016 at 17:35
  • Unfortunately I cannot target an OS. I am saving files (with the generated filenames) to Dropbox, so I can access them from wherever I want. But according to this, it shouldn't be a problem. I'll just target Windows and it will work also on Mac. (I guess this is what you meant by "least common denominator")
    – st_phan
    Commented Feb 19, 2016 at 18:13

3 Answers 3

5

Use string replace function

var str = 'Article: "Un éléphant à l'orée du bois/An elephant at the edge of the woods".txt';
var out = (str.replace(/[ &\/\\#,+()$~%.'":*?<>{}]/g, ""));

Or expect number and letter

var out=(str.replace(/[^a-zA-Z0-9]/g, ''));
0
0

When you assign a value to the variable, you use a single quote ', in which the string will break if you have another ' in your string. You need to add a backslash \ before the single quote inside when you declare the string.

However, if the string you are using is got from somewhere, then you don't need to add a backslash because it's probably handled well in another place.

Note that / \ : * ? " < > | are not allowed for filename.

So if the value is set in a variable already, you need to remove all these characters. Do this

    var str = 'Article: "Un éléphant à l\'orée du bois/An elephant at the edge of the woods".txt';
    str = str.replace(/[\/\\:*?"<>]/g, ""));
3
  • Thanks for pointing out the missing backslash (it was meant as pseudocode, but I now added it for clarity).
    – st_phan
    Commented Feb 19, 2016 at 18:23
  • I took your solution and wrote a short code snippet with a function, so other people can just copy paste it for their projects. Thank you very much for the quick reply! This was exactly what I needed!
    – st_phan
    Commented Feb 19, 2016 at 18:23
  • I also added "|" to the string replacement, as it seems you forgot to add it (even though you mentioned it in your text)
    – st_phan
    Commented Feb 19, 2016 at 22:21
0

Huge thanks to Kelvin's answer!

I quickly compiled it into a function. The final code I used is:

function convertToValidFilename(string) {
    return (string.replace(/[\/|\\:*?"<>]/g, " "));
}

var string = 'Un éléphant à l\'orée du bois/An elephant at the edge of the woods".txt';

console.log("Before = ", string);
console.log("After  = ", convertToValidFilename(string));

This results in the output:

Before =  Un éléphant à l'orée du bois/An elephant at the edge of the woods".txt
After  =  Un éléphant à l orée du bois An elephant at the edge of the woods .txt

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