135

Is there any way to chain multiple lets for multiple nullable variables in kotlin?

fun example(first: String?, second: String?) {
    first?.let {
        second?.let {
            // Do something just if both are != null
        }
    }
}

I mean, something like this:

fun example(first: String?, second: String?) {
    first?.let && second?.let { 
        // Do something just if both are != null
    }
}
  • 1
    Do you want N items, not just 2? Do all the items need the same type, or different types? Should all values be passed into the function, as list, or as individual parameters? Should the return value be a single item or a group of same number of items as input? – Jayson Minard Feb 20 '16 at 11:34
  • I need all arguments, can be two for this case but also wanted to know a way to do this for more, in swift is so easy. – Daniel Gomez Rico Feb 21 '16 at 16:39
  • Are you looking for something different than the answers below, if so comment what is the difference you are seeking. – Jayson Minard Feb 21 '16 at 17:38
  • How would it be to refer to the first "it" within the second let block? – Javier Mendonça Feb 15 '18 at 13:16

11 Answers 11

60

If interested here are two of my functions for solving this.

inline fun <T: Any> guardLet(vararg elements: T?, closure: () -> Nothing): List<T> {
    return if (elements.all { it != null }) {
        elements.filterNotNull()
    } else {
        closure()
    }
}

inline fun <T: Any> ifLet(vararg elements: T?, closure: (List<T>) -> Unit) {
    if (elements.all { it != null }) {
        closure(elements.filterNotNull())
    }
}

Usage:


// Will print
val (first, second, third) = guardLet("Hello", 3, Thing("Hello")) { return }
println(first)
println(second)
println(third)

// Will return
val (first, second, third) = guardLet("Hello", null, Thing("Hello")) { return }
println(first)
println(second)
println(third)

// Will print
ifLet("Hello", "A", 9) {
 (first, second, third) ->
 println(first)
 println(second)
 println(third)
}

// Won't print
ifLet("Hello", 9, null) {
 (first, second, third) ->
 println(first)
 println(second)
 println(third)
}
| improve this answer | |
  • This is very nice, but I am still missing a case where I can use the first input in the second. Example: ifLet("A", toLower(first)) { //first = "A", second = "a" } – Otziii Aug 13 '19 at 11:18
  • Cause in the ifLet statement the first argument is not yet been unwrapped, a function like your is not possible. Can I suggest to use guardLet? It's pretty straight forward. val (first) = guardLet(100) { return } val (second) = guardLet(101) { return } val average = average(first, second) I know that is not what's you asked, but hope it helps. – Dario Pellegrini Aug 29 '19 at 12:28
  • Thanks. I have multiple ways of solving this, the reason for saying is that in Swift its possible to have multiple ifLets after each others separated by comma and they can use the variables of the previous check. I wish this was possible in Kotlin as well. :) – Otziii Sep 2 '19 at 10:08
  • 1
    It could be accepted answer, but there is overhead on every call. Because vm creates Function object firstly. Also considering dex limitation, this will add Function class declaration with 2 method references for every unique checks. – Oleksandr Albul Oct 1 '19 at 2:34
  • 1
    Maybe I'm wrong, but it looks like for example when you pass different types into these functions, T will be deduced as any. So, the lambda variables first, second, third, are of type Any, which means you need to cast them back to do anything useful with them. – Nir Friedman Sep 16 at 15:17
151

Here are a few variations, depending on what style you will want to use, if you have everything of same or different types, and if the list unknown number of items...

Mixed types, all must not be null to calculate a new value

For mixed types you could build a series of functions for each parameter count that may look silly, but work nicely for mixed types:

inline fun <T1: Any, T2: Any, R: Any> safeLet(p1: T1?, p2: T2?, block: (T1, T2)->R?): R? {
    return if (p1 != null && p2 != null) block(p1, p2) else null
}
inline fun <T1: Any, T2: Any, T3: Any, R: Any> safeLet(p1: T1?, p2: T2?, p3: T3?, block: (T1, T2, T3)->R?): R? {
    return if (p1 != null && p2 != null && p3 != null) block(p1, p2, p3) else null
}
inline fun <T1: Any, T2: Any, T3: Any, T4: Any, R: Any> safeLet(p1: T1?, p2: T2?, p3: T3?, p4: T4?, block: (T1, T2, T3, T4)->R?): R? {
    return if (p1 != null && p2 != null && p3 != null && p4 != null) block(p1, p2, p3, p4) else null
}
inline fun <T1: Any, T2: Any, T3: Any, T4: Any, T5: Any, R: Any> safeLet(p1: T1?, p2: T2?, p3: T3?, p4: T4?, p5: T5?, block: (T1, T2, T3, T4, T5)->R?): R? {
    return if (p1 != null && p2 != null && p3 != null && p4 != null && p5 != null) block(p1, p2, p3, p4, p5) else null
}
// ...keep going up to the parameter count you care about

Example usage:

val risk = safeLet(person.name, person.age) { name, age ->
  // do something
}   

Execute block of code when list has no null items

Two flavours here, first to execute block of code when a list has all non null items, and second to do the same when a list has at least one not null item. Both cases pass a list of non null items to the block of code:

Functions:

fun <T: Any, R: Any> Collection<T?>.whenAllNotNull(block: (List<T>)->R) {
    if (this.all { it != null }) {
        block(this.filterNotNull()) // or do unsafe cast to non null collectino
    }
}

fun <T: Any, R: Any> Collection<T?>.whenAnyNotNull(block: (List<T>)->R) {
    if (this.any { it != null }) {
        block(this.filterNotNull())
    }
}

Example usage:

listOf("something", "else", "matters").whenAllNotNull {
    println(it.joinToString(" "))
} // output "something else matters"

listOf("something", null, "matters").whenAllNotNull {
    println(it.joinToString(" "))
} // no output

listOf("something", null, "matters").whenAnyNotNull {
    println(it.joinToString(" "))
} // output "something matters"

A slight change to have the function receive the list of items and do the same operations:

fun <T: Any, R: Any> whenAllNotNull(vararg options: T?, block: (List<T>)->R) {
    if (options.all { it != null }) {
        block(options.filterNotNull()) // or do unsafe cast to non null collection
    }
}

fun <T: Any, R: Any> whenAnyNotNull(vararg options: T?, block: (List<T>)->R) {
    if (options.any { it != null }) {
        block(options.filterNotNull())
    }
}

Example usage:

whenAllNotNull("something", "else", "matters") {
    println(it.joinToString(" "))
} // output "something else matters"

These variations could be changed to have return values like let().

Use the first non-null item (Coalesce)

Similar to a SQL Coalesce function, return the first non null item. Two flavours of the function:

fun <T: Any> coalesce(vararg options: T?): T? = options.firstOrNull { it != null }
fun <T: Any> Collection<T?>.coalesce(): T? = this.firstOrNull { it != null }

Example usage:

coalesce(null, "something", null, "matters")?.let {
    it.length
} // result is 9, length of "something"

listOf(null, "something", null, "matters").coalesce()?.let {
    it.length
}  // result is 9, length of "something"

Other variations

...There are other variations, but with more of a specification this could be narrowed down.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    You could also combine whenAllNotNull with destructuring like so: listOf(a, b, c).whenAllNotNull { (d, e, f) -> println("$d $e $f"). – dumptruckman Mar 27 '19 at 16:19
10

You can write your own function for that:

 fun <T, U, R> Pair<T?, U?>.biLet(body: (T, U) -> R): R? {
     val first = first
     val second = second
     if (first != null && second != null) {
         return body(first, second)
     }
     return null
 }

 (first to second).biLet { first, second -> 
      // body
 }
| improve this answer | |
7

You can create an arrayIfNoNulls function:

fun <T : Any> arrayIfNoNulls(vararg elements: T?): Array<T>? {
    if (null in elements) {
        return null
    }
    @Suppress("UNCHECKED_CAST")
    return elements as Array<T>
}

You can then use it for a variable number of values with let:

fun example(first: String?, second: String?) {
    arrayIfNoNulls(first, second)?.let { (first, second) ->
        // Do something if each element is not null
    }
}

If you already have an array you can create a takeIfNoNulls function (inspired by takeIf and requireNoNulls):

fun <T : Any> Array<T?>.takeIfNoNulls(): Array<T>? {
    if (null in this) {
        return null
    }
    @Suppress("UNCHECKED_CAST")
    return this as Array<T>
}

Example:

array?.takeIfNoNulls()?.let { (first, second) ->
    // Do something if each element is not null
}
| improve this answer | |
3

Actually, you can simply do this, you know? ;)

if (first != null && second != null) {
    // your logic here...
}

There's nothing wrong in using a normal null-check in Kotlin.

And it's far more readable for everyone who will look into your code.

| improve this answer | |
  • 37
    It won't be enough when dealing with a mutable class member. – Michał K Jul 7 '17 at 11:27
  • 3
    No need to give this kind of answer, the intention of the question is to find a more "productive way" of handling this, since the language provides the let shortcut to do these checks – Alejandro Moya Oct 23 '18 at 23:58
  • 2
    In terms of maintainability, this is my choice, even if tis not as elegant. This is clearly an issue that everyone runs across all the time, and the language should deal with. – Brill Pappin Apr 3 at 16:08
  • 1
    Given the function parameter is not-mutable (as per the question), using let is not ideal as it introduces unnecessary temp variables, hence check null directly is straightforward and more efficient as @Gzegorz shared. medium.com/mobile-app-development-publication/… Upvote the answer. – Elye Sep 15 at 9:43
3

For the case of just checking two values and also not having to work with lists:

fun <T1, T2> ifNotNull(value1: T1?, value2: T2?, bothNotNull: (T1, T2) -> (Unit)) {
    if (value1 != null && value2 != null) {
        bothNotNull(value1, value2)
    }
}

Usage example:

var firstString: String?
var secondString: String?
ifNotNull(firstString, secondString) { first, second -> Log.d(TAG, "$first, $second") }
| improve this answer | |
2

I actually prefer to solve it using the following helper functions:

fun <A, B> T(tuple: Pair<A?, B?>): Pair<A, B>? =
    if(tuple.first == null || tuple.second == null) null
    else Pair(tuple.first!!, tuple.second!!)

fun <A, B, C> T(tuple: Triple<A?, B?, C?>): Triple<A, B, C>? =
    if(tuple.first == null || tuple.second == null || tuple.third == null) null
    else Triple(tuple.first!!, tuple.second!!, tuple.third!!)


fun <A, B> T(first: A?, second: B?): Pair<A, B>? =
    if(first == null || second == null) null
    else Pair(first, second)

fun <A, B, C> T(first: A?, second: B?, third: C?): Triple<A, B, C>? =
        if(first == null || second == null || third == null) null
        else Triple(first, second, third)

And here's how you should use them:

val a: A? = someValue
val b: B? = someOtherValue
T(a, b)?.let { (a, b) ->
  // Shadowed a and b are of type a: A and b: B
  val c: C? = anotherValue
  T(a, b, c)
}?.let { (a, b, c) ->
  // Shadowed a, b and c are of type a: A, b: B and c: C
  .
  .
  .
}
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1

I solved this by creating some functions that more or less replicates the behavior of with, but takes multiple parameters and only invokes the function of all the parameters is non-null.

fun <R, A, B> withNoNulls(p1: A?, p2: B?, function: (p1: A, p2: B) -> R): R? = p1?.let { p2?.let { function.invoke(p1, p2) } }
fun <R, A, B, C> withNoNulls(p1: A?, p2: B?, p3: C?, function: (p1: A, p2: B, p3: C) -> R): R? = p1?.let { p2?.let { p3?.let { function.invoke(p1, p2, p3) } } }
fun <R, A, B, C, D> withNoNulls(p1: A?, p2: B?, p3: C?, p4: D?, function: (p1: A, p2: B, p3: C, p4: D) -> R): R? = p1?.let { p2?.let { p3?.let { p4?.let { function.invoke(p1, p2, p3, p4) } } } }
fun <R, A, B, C, D, E> withNoNulls(p1: A?, p2: B?, p3: C?, p4: D?, p5: E?, function: (p1: A, p2: B, p3: C, p4: D, p5: E) -> R): R? = p1?.let { p2?.let { p3?.let { p4?.let { p5?.let { function.invoke(p1, p2, p3, p4, p5) } } } } }

Then I use it like this:

withNoNulls("hello", "world", Throwable("error")) { p1, p2, p3 ->
    p3.printStackTrace()
    p1.plus(" ").plus(p2)
}?.let {
    Log.d("TAG", it)
} ?: throw Exception("One or more parameters was null")

The obvious issue with this is that I have to define a function for each case (number of variables) I need, but at least I think the code looks clean when using them.

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1

You could also do this

if (listOfNotNull(var1, var2, var3).size == 3) {
        // All variables are non-null
}
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  • The compiler will still complain that it can't guarantee that the vars are not null – Peter Graham May 7 at 23:11
1

I have upgraded the expected answer a bit:

inline fun <T: Any, R: Any> ifLet(vararg elements: T?, closure: (List<T>) -> R): R? {
    return if (elements.all { it != null }) {
        closure(elements.filterNotNull())
    } else null
}

this makes this possible:

iflet("first", "sconed") {
    // do somehing
} ?: run {
    // do this if one of the params are null
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Thats cool, but the parameters are not named and should share the type. – Daniel Gomez Rico Apr 12 at 23:13
0

For any amount of values to be checked you can use this:

    fun checkNulls(vararg elements: Any?, block: (Array<*>) -> Unit) {
        elements.forEach { if (it == null) return }
        block(elements.requireNoNulls())
    }

And it will be used like this:

    val dada: String? = null
    val dede = "1"

    checkNulls(dada, dede) { strings ->

    }

the elements sent to the block are using the wildcard, you need to check the types if you want to access the values, if you need to use just one type you could mutate this to generics

| improve this answer | |

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