43

I was trying to add a new element into a list as follow:

iex(8)> l = [3,5,7,7,8] ++ 3
[3, 5, 7, 7, 8 | 3]
iex(9)> l
[3, 5, 7, 7, 8 | 3]

Why did I get on the 5th position like

8 | 3

What it does mean?
And how can I add new element to the list?

--------Update--------
I try to loop the list as follow:

iex(2)> l = [1,2] ++ 3
[1, 2 | 3]
iex(3)> Enum.each(l, fn(x) -> IO.puts(x) end)
1
2
** (FunctionClauseError) no function clause matching in Enum."-each/2-lists^foreach/1-0-"/2
    (elixir) lib/enum.ex:604: Enum."-each/2-lists^foreach/1-0-"(#Function<6.54118792/1 in :erl_eval.expr/5>, 3)
    (elixir) lib/enum.ex:604: Enum.each/2

Since the pointer of the number 2 is not pointing to a list, rather to value 3, how can I loop the list?

  • Google for "Elixir Improper List". That notation is indicating an improper list. – Onorio Catenacci Feb 20 '16 at 21:37
45

The ++ operator is for concatenating two lists, then maybe what you want to do in order to add a new element is to put it within a list. Then, I think you should add the 3 into another list:

iex(2)> l = [3,5,7,7,8] ++ [3]

[3, 5, 7, 7, 8, 3]

  • But I want to know what does 8 | 3mean? – zero_coding Feb 20 '16 at 21:20
  • 2
    Lists in Elixir are linked lists. The A | B means that the pointer of cell A is pointing to B. In your case, it means that the last element of your list is pointing to the element that stores the 3. – Salvador Medina Feb 20 '16 at 21:27
  • 4
    @SalvadorMedina No, in this case the 8 | 3 indicates an improper list. Google "Elixir improper list" and you'll see what it is. – Onorio Catenacci Feb 22 '16 at 13:14
  • @OnorioCatenacci Oh, thanks for the clarification on the notation! It's great to learn this way. – Salvador Medina Feb 23 '16 at 6:18
  • 11
    a caution from the docs: "Due to their cons cell based representation, prepending an element to a list is always fast (constant time), while appending becomes slower as the list grows in size (linear time): iex> list = [1, 2, 3] iex> [0 | list] # fast [0, 1, 2, 3] iex> list ++ [4] # slow [1, 2, 3, 4]" – Alexandr Nil Jan 2 '17 at 16:21
50

Just follow the Elixir docs to add an element to a list ( and keep performance in mind =) ):

iex> list = [1, 2, 3]
iex> [0 | list]   # fast
[0, 1, 2, 3]
iex> list ++ [4]  # slow
[1, 2, 3, 4]

https://hexdocs.pm/elixir/List.html

  • 11
    Because lists in Elixir / Erlang are linked lists internally, so adding in the front of the list is a fast operation because you don't need to recreate the links on the tail of the list. So adding the element in the end of the list will require the linked list to recreate all links again from back to front. – Eduardo Pereira Jun 4 '17 at 2:26
  • 1
    I didn't understand how appending an element to a linked list could be computationally expensive while prepending was cheap until I saw this snippet, which shows cons cells underlying the List: iex> [1 | [2 | [3 | []]]] [1, 2, 3] – Abraham Sangha Dec 4 '17 at 19:44
7

First: [1, 2 | 3] is the notation for an improper list.

Second: To do the Enum.each you're trying to do with an improper list the code would look like this:

Matching against proper/improper lists is correspondingly easy. So a length function len for proper lists:

len([_|T]) -> 1 + len(T); len([]) -> 0. where we explicitly match for the terminating []. If given an improper list this will generate an error. While the function last_tail which returns the last tail of a list can handle improper lists as well:

last_tail([_|T]) -> last_tail(T); last_tail(Tail) -> Tail.
%Will match any tail

That is, of course, Erlang code from @rvirding. Translated to Elixir and translated to do the printing you give in your example, it'd look like this:

iex(6)> defmodule T do
...(6)>   defp print([h|t]) do
...(6)>     IO.puts(h)
...(6)>     print(t)
...(6)>   end
...(6)>   defp print(t) do
...(6)>     IO.puts(t)
...(6)>   end
...(6)>   def print_improper_list(il), do: print(il)
...(6)> end
iex:6: warning: redefining module T
{:module, T,
 <<70, 79, 82, 49, 0, 0, 5, 136, 66, 69, 65, 77, 69, 120, 68, 99, 0, 0, 0, 161, 131, 104, 2, 100, 0, 14, 101, 108, 105, 120, 105, 114, 95, 100, 111, 99, 115, 95, 118, 49, 108, 0, 0, 0, 4, 104, 2, ...>>,
 {:print_improper_list, 1}}
iex(7)> T.print_improper_list([1,2,3|4])
1
2
3
4
:ok

I leave it as an exercise for you to figure out how to do that with an Enum.each.

2

Join by Enum.concat

Example:

iex> new_elem = 5
iex> Enum.concat([1, 2, 3], [new_elem])
[1, 2, 3, 5]
  • It uses Kernel.++/2 internally for concatenating lists. – Michał Szajbe Aug 21 '19 at 19:46
-4

The "I" means that the list is divided into head and tail like so [head | tail]. If you pattern match the list this way you can manipulate both parts of the list and use the ++ operator for concatenation.

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