15

This is a problem from Introduction to algorithms course:

You have an array with n random positive integers (the array doesn't need to be sorted or the elements unique). Suggest an O(n) algorithm to find the largest sum of elements, that is divisible by n.

It's relatively easy to find it in O(n2) using dynamic programming and storing largest sum with remainder 0, 1, 2,..., n - 1. This is a JavaScript code:

function sum_mod_n(a)
{
    var n = a.length;

    var b = new Array(n);
    b.fill(-1);

    for (var i = 0; i < n; i++)
    {
        var u = a[i] % n;
        var c = b.slice();

        for (var j = 0; j < n; j++) if (b[j] > -1)
        {
            var v = (u + j) % n;
            if (b[j] + a[i] > b[v]) c[v] = b[j] + a[i];
        }

        if (c[u] == -1) c[u] = a[i];
        b = c;
    }

    return b[0];
}

It's also easy to find it in O(n) for contiguous elements, storing partial sums MOD n. Another sample:

function cont_mod_n(a)
{
    var n = a.length;

    var b = new Array(n);
    b.fill(-1);

    b[0] = 0;

    var m = 0, s = 0;

    for (var i = 0; i < n; i++)
    {
        s += a[i];
        var u = s % n;
        if (b[u] == -1) b[u] = s;
        else if (s - b[u] > m) m = s - b[u];
    }

    return m;
}

But how about O(n) in the general case? Any suggestions will be appreciated! I consider this has something to deal with linear algebra but I'm not sure what exactly.

EDIT: Can this actually be done in O(n log n)?

  • 2
    could you describe the O(n^2) algorithm? – miracle173 Feb 20 '16 at 23:26
  • 3
    add a link to this Introduction to algorithms course – Salvador Dali Feb 21 '16 at 10:05
  • 2
    Do you mean largest contiguous sum? – Carlos Feb 24 '16 at 18:17
  • 1
    the selection no need to be contiguous? – shole Feb 26 '16 at 6:30
  • 2
    This has been cross-posted on cs.stackexchange.com (cs.stackexchange.com/revisions/53849/1). In future, please do not cross-post questions. For more information, see here. – Matt Mar 10 '16 at 7:20
1

Since you don't specify what random means (uniform? if so in what interval?) the only general solution is the one for arbitrary arrays and I don't think you can get any better than O(n2). This is the dynamic programming algorithm in Python:

def sum_div(positive_integers):
    n = len(positive_integers)
    # initialise the dynamic programming state
    # the index runs on all possible reminders mod n
    # the DP values keep track of the maximum sum you can have for that reminder
    DP = [0] * n
    for positive_integer in positive_integers:
        for remainder, max_sum in list(enumerate(DP)):
            max_sum_next = max_sum + positive_integer
            remainder_next = max_sum_next % n
            if max_sum_next > DP[remainder_next]:
                DP[remainder_next] = max_sum_next
    return DP[0]

You can probably work out a faster solution if you have an upper limit for the values in the array, e.g. n.

0

Very interesting question ! This is my JS code. I don't think that O(n^2) can be lowered, hence I suppose that the way is to find an algorithm being more efficient in terms of benchmarking.

My (corrected) approach boils down to explore paths of sums until the next matching one (i.e. divisible by _n) is computed. The source array progressively shrinks as next sums are found.

(I provided different examples at the top)

var _a = [1000, 1000, 1000, 1000, 1000, 1000, 99, 10, 9] ;
//var _a = [1000, 1000, 1000, 1000, 1000, 1000, 99, 10, 9, 11] ;
//var _a = [1, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 49] ;
//var _a = [ -1, 1, 2, 4 ] ;
//var _a = [ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 ] ;
//var _a = [1,1,1,1,1,1] ;
var _n = _a.length, _del_indexes = [] ;
var _rec = 0, _sum = 0, _start = 0, _test = 0 ;

console.log( "input array : ", _a );
console.log( "cardinality : ", _a.length );

while( _start < _a.length )
{
    _test = 0 ;
    for( var _i = _start ; _i < _a.length ; _i++ )
    {
             _sum += _a[_i%_n] ;
             _del_indexes.push( _a[_i%_n] );
             if ( ( _sum % _n ) == 0 )
             {
                 _rec = _sum ;
                 _test = 1 ;
                 break ;
             }
    }

    if ( _test )
    {
        for( var _d = 0 ; _d < _del_indexes.length ; _d++ ) _a.splice( _a.indexOf( _del_indexes[_d] ), 1 ) ;
        _start = 0 ;
    }
    else _start++ ;

    _del_indexes = [] ;
    _sum = _rec ;
}

console.log( "Largest sum % " + _n + " is : ", _rec == 0 ? "none" : _rec );
  • this is O(n^2) and i don't it's correct... consider a = [49, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 1] – delta-terminator Mar 6 '16 at 12:25
  • No, because in your suggested example, only one pass (7 sums) is required to check that 49 is the largest sum being divisible by 7 = a.length. You're not evaluating n x n entries here. – Sandro Rosa Mar 6 '16 at 12:46
  • the answer is 56 with 49, 6 and 1... and what about a = [1000, 1000, 1000, 1000, 1000, 1000, 99, 10, 9]?... the answer is 108 with 99 and 9... your algorithm runs in n^2 and i'm not sure it will actually find the result – delta-terminator Mar 6 '16 at 13:12
  • You're right. I corrected it again above, in order to try another approach. However, I think that O(n^2) is required. One could just try to speed it up through some tricks and benchmarks. – Sandro Rosa Mar 6 '16 at 14:07

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.