125

I am trying to declare a struct that is dependent upon another struct. I want to use sizeof to be safe/pedantic.

typedef struct _parent
{
  float calc ;
  char text[255] ;
  int used ;
} parent_t ;

Now I want to declare a struct child_t that has the same size as parent_t.text.

How can I do this? (Pseudo-code below.)

typedef struct _child
{
  char flag ;
  char text[sizeof(parent_t.text)] ;
  int used ;
} child_t ;

I tried a few different ways with parent_t and struct _parent, but my compiler will not accept.

As a trick, this seems to work:

parent_t* dummy ;
typedef struct _child
{
  char flag ;
  char text[sizeof(dummy->text)] ;
  int used ;
} child_t ;

Is it possible to declare child_t without the use of dummy?

9 Answers 9

234

Although defining the buffer size with a #define is one idiomatic way to do it, another would be to use a macro like this:

#define member_size(type, member) sizeof(((type *)0)->member)

and use it like this:

typedef struct
{
    float calc;
    char text[255];
    int used;
} Parent;

typedef struct
{
    char flag;
    char text[member_size(Parent, text)];
    int used;
} Child;

I'm actually a bit surprised that sizeof((type *)0)->member) is even allowed as a constant expression. Cool stuff.

6
  • 2
    Wow, I didn't know sizeof((type *)0)->member) works. Am not on my dev machine now, but does this work for all the compilers? Thanks for that Joey.
    – Gangadhar
    Aug 24, 2010 at 5:03
  • 5
    @Gangadhar: Yes, this works for all compilers. The operand of sizeof is not evaluated, so there is no issue with dereferencing the null pointer (because it isn't actually dereferenced). Aug 24, 2010 at 5:50
  • 4
    wonderful? its plain C89, see implementation of "offsetof" in <stddef.h> or the same implementation eetimes.com/design/other/4024941/…
    – user411313
    Aug 24, 2010 at 7:35
  • 1
    @XavierGeoffrey: Here, sizeof infers the type of ((type *)0)->member, and returns the size of that type. ((type *)0) is just a null pointer of the struct type. ptr->member is (at compile time) an expression whose type is that of the member. The code within the sizeof never runs (if it did, the program would segfault!). Only the type of value within the sizeof is looked at.
    – Joey Adams
    Sep 29, 2014 at 21:13
  • 3
    The Wikipedia page for offset_of notes this as undefined behaviour according to the C standard, so I wouldn't bet on it working with all compilers.
    – Graeme
    Aug 3, 2015 at 15:49
39

I am not on my development machine right now, but I think you can do one of the following:

sizeof(((parent_t *)0)->text)

sizeof(((parent_t){0}).text)


Edit: I like the member_size macro Joey suggested using this technique, I think I would use that.

3
  • 15
    The second form is very nice (and conceptually clean in that it does not involve null pointers), but you should mention that it's not possible in pre-C99 compilers. Aug 25, 2010 at 0:09
  • if the struct is very large and memory is a constraint first one should be preferred. someone correct me if I'm wrong.
    – PunyCode
    Aug 3, 2021 at 5:20
  • 2
    @PunyCode - the sizeof operand is evaluated at compile time, so no memory issue. Nov 22, 2021 at 14:23
15

You are free to use FIELD_SIZEOF(t, f) in the Linux kernel. It's just defined as following:

#define FIELD_SIZEOF(t, f) (sizeof(((t*)0)->f))

This type of macro is mentioned in other answers. But it's more portable to use an already-defined macro.

4
  • 5
    FIELD_SIZEOF is the macro used in modern Linux kernels, found in linux/kernel.h Sep 18, 2017 at 9:38
  • @ColinIanKing So this is an idiomatic way in C in general to get the struct member size? Isn't such a macro included in a Standard in modern C yet?
    – St.Antario
    Dec 19, 2018 at 5:32
  • To my knowledge there is no equivalent macro in standard C. Dec 19, 2018 at 8:01
  • 4
    It was recently removed from linux/kernel.h. Feb 18, 2020 at 12:47
11

Use a preprocessor directive, i.e. #define:

#define TEXT_LEN 255

typedef struct _parent
{
  float calc ;
  char text[TEXT_LEN] ;
  int used ;
} parent_t ;

typedef struct _child
{
  char flag ;
  char text[TEXT_LEN] ;
  int used ;
} child_t ;
5
  • Agree with Nyan. The other solutions work, but don't accomplish anything different. If you want to be more explicit, call it PARENT_TEXT_LEN or something equally descriptive. You can then also use it in conditionals throughout your code to prevent buffer length errors and it will be doing simple integer comparisons. Aug 24, 2010 at 12:40
  • 1
    i think the advantage of the sizeof solution is that you don't need access to the parent struct, if it is defined in a library or somewhere else.
    – user410344
    Aug 24, 2010 at 12:59
  • @evilclown: but you do: "char text[member_size(Parent, text)];" You need to reference the "Parent". Aug 24, 2010 at 14:02
  • 3
    i don't think you understood me. suppose the parent struct is drand48_data (defined in stdlib.h) and you want the sizeof __x. you cannot #define X_LEN 3 and change the stdlib.h, using member_size is superior when you don't have access to the source of the parent struct, which seems like a reasonable situation.
    – user410344
    Aug 25, 2010 at 1:42
  • This solution is not applicable if the parent_t structure comes from some library, where you are not allowed (or don't want) to change the declarations of the structure members.
    – OpalApps
    Feb 8, 2021 at 14:44
5

You can use a preprocessor directive for size as:

#define TEXT_MAX_SIZE 255

and use it in both parent and child.

1
  • 1
    yep, but it's not always an option: say, in linux /usr/include/bits/dirent.h the size of the d_name field (struct direct / dirent) is not defined as DIRSIZ any more but hard-coded; so sizeof() seems to be the only clean way to keep the dependency Jan 21, 2012 at 17:08
5

struct.h has them already defined,

#define fldsiz(name, field) \
    (sizeof(((struct name *)0)->field))

so you could,

#include <stdlib.h> /* EXIT_SUCCESS */
#include <stdio.h>  /* printf */
#include <struct.h> /* fldsiz */

struct Penguin {
    char name[128];
    struct Penguin *child[16];
};
static const int name_size  = fldsiz(Penguin, name) / sizeof(char);
static const int child_size = fldsiz(Penguin, child) / sizeof(struct Penguin *);

int main(void) {
    printf("Penguin.name is %d chars and Penguin.child is %d Penguin *.\n",
           name_size, child_size);
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

but, on looking in the header, it appears that this is a BSD thing and not ANSI or POSIX standard. I tried it on a Linux machine and it didn't work; limited usefulness.

4

Another possibility would be to define a type. The fact that you want to ensure the same size for the two fields is an indicator that you have the same semantics for them, I think.

typedef char description[255];

and then have a field

description text;

in both of your types.

4

c++ solution:

sizeof(Type::member) seems to be working as well:

struct Parent
{
    float calc;
    char text[255];
    int used;
};

struct Child
{
    char flag;
    char text[sizeof(Parent::text)];
    int used;
};
1
  • 5
    The question is about C, not C++.
    – Marc
    Apr 28, 2016 at 14:28
0

@joey-adams, thank you! I was searching the same thing, but for non char array and it works perfectly fine even this way:

#define member_dim(type, member) sizeof(((type*)0)->member) / \
                                 sizeof(((type*)0)->member[0])

struct parent {
        int array[20];
};

struct child {
        int array[member_dim(struct parent, array)];
};

int main ( void ) {
        return member_dim(struct child, array);
}

It returns 20 as expected.

And, @brandon-horsley, this works good too:

#define member_dim(type, member) sizeof(((type){0}).member) / \
                                 sizeof(((type){0}).member[0])

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