Since ES6 classes are just a syntactical sugar over JavaScript's existing prototype-based inheritance [1] it would (IMO) make sense to hoist it's definition:

var foo = new Foo(1, 2); //this works

function Foo(x, y) {
   this.x = x;
   this.y = y;
}

But the following won't work:

var foo = new Foo(1, 2); //ReferenceError

class Foo {
   constructor(x, y) {
      this.x = x;
      this.y = y;
   }
}

Why are ES6 classes not hoisted?

  • 4
    ES6 classes aren't just syntactic sugar, although they're mostly syntactic sugar. – T.J. Crowder Feb 21 '16 at 14:56
  • 2
    Hoisting has been an almost endless source of misunderstanding and confusion. All of the new declaration constructs (let, const, class) added in ES6 are un-hoisted (well, they're half-hoisted). Barring a quote from Eich or similar, you're not going to get an answer that isn't effectively speculation. – T.J. Crowder Feb 21 '16 at 14:57
  • @mmm: MDN is edited by the community, and sometimes wrong. Not often, not nearly as often as, say, that other site, but sometimes. See this answer for how they're both hoisted and not hoisted. – T.J. Crowder Feb 21 '16 at 15:01
  • Ok, interesting - I've read Bergi's answer before and was wondering about mdn... @T.J.Crowder – bambam Feb 21 '16 at 15:02
  • 4
    @PetrPeller: I think they decided it was wrong for variables, constants, and classes, yes, and very likely because of issues such as the one Bergi mentioned above. I find the fact that functions are hoisted useful, but I don't know that they'd agree. Where it breaks down is when you have things that are both hoisted (function decls) and non-hoisted (adding properties to them or their prototype object). But normal functions, it's quite handy. – T.J. Crowder Feb 21 '16 at 15:26
up vote 42 down vote accepted

Why are ES6 classes not hoisted?

Actually they are hoisted (the variable binding is available in the whole scope) just like let and const are - they only are not initialised.

It would make sense to hoist its definition

No. It's never a good idea to use a class before its definition. Consider the example

var foo = new Bar(); // this appears to work
console.log(foo.x)   // but doesn't

function Bar(x) {
    this.x = x || Bar.defaultX;
}
Bar.defaultX = 0;

and compare it to

var foo = new Bar(); // ReferenceError
console.log(foo.x);

class Bar {
    constructor (x = Bar.defaultX) {
        this.x = x;
    }
}
Bar.defaultX = 0;

which throws an error as you would expect. This is a problem for static properties, prototype mixins, decorators and everything. Also it is quite important for subclassing, which broke entirely in ES5 when you used a class with its non-adjusted prototype, but now throws an error if an extended class is not yet initialised.

  • To clarify in your first example, the issue is that console.log(foo.x) would yield undefined instead of 0 not that there would be a run time error. – Jorge Cabot Aug 4 '17 at 21:08

In Javascript all declarations (var, let, const, function, function*, class) are hoisted but it should be declared in same scope.

As you told "ES6 classes are just a syntactical sugar over JavaScript's existing prototype-based inheritance"

So Let's understand what it is?

Here you declared a class which is in fact "special function".Let's assume that your function Foo() and class Foo both are in global scope.

class Foo {
   constructor(x, y) {
      this.x = x;
      this.y = y;
   }
}

Following is the compiled code of your class Foo.

var Foo = (function () {
    function Foo(x, y) {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
    }
    return Foo;
}());

Internally your class is converted to function with the same name inside wrapper function(iife) and that wrapper function returns your function.

Because your function's(class) scope is changed. and you are trying to create object of function in global scope which is in reality not exist.

you get the function in variable Foo once compilation comes to that. so later you have function in var you can create object of that.

  • While it has a similar effect, this is not what happens. No IIFE is created to evaluate the class. ecma-international.org/ecma-262/8.0/… – Felix Kling Sep 22 '17 at 4:46
  • if i am not wrong this a iife syntax (function () {}()). if you compile class this code will be generated.since it is assigned to var it is not invoked globally. instead its self invoked and returns value to Foo. – mihir hapaliya Sep 23 '17 at 11:38
  • If you use something like babel, yes. But environments that support classes natively won’t do that. – Felix Kling Sep 23 '17 at 14:18

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