Given today's time e.g. 2:24PM, how do I get it to round to 2:30PM?

Similarly if the time was 2:17PM, how do I get it to round to 2:15PM?

12 Answers 12

up vote 69 down vote accepted

Rounding

You will need to use modulo to truncate the quarter hour:

Date whateverDateYouWant = new Date();
Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
calendar.setTime(whateverDateYouWant);

int unroundedMinutes = calendar.get(Calendar.MINUTE);
int mod = unroundedMinutes % 15;
calendar.add(Calendar.MINUTE, mod < 8 ? -mod : (15-mod));

As pointed out by EJP, this is also OK (replacement for the last line, only valid if the calendar is lenient):

calendar.set(Calendar.MINUTE, unroundedMinutes + mod);

Improvements

If you want to be exact, you will also have to truncate the smaller fields:

calendar.set(Calendar.SECOND, 0);
calendar.set(Calendar.MILLISECOND, 0);

You can also use DateUtils.truncate() from Apache Commons / Lang to do this:

calendar = DateUtils.truncate(calendar, Calendar.MINUTE);
  • uh i just construct it from the calendar class – lock Aug 24 '10 at 6:36
  • 1
    This method will floor the minutes to low closest quarter and you need to add some check if it was rounded to the next hour so that you need to update the hour too... – Ido Weinstein Aug 24 '10 at 6:38
  • 1
    The current version fixes these issues – Sean Patrick Floyd Aug 24 '10 at 7:38
  • (unroundedMinutes+8) % 15 is simpler, and just set, don't add. – user207421 Aug 24 '10 at 7:41
  • edit: it should be mod < 8 ? -mod : (15-mod) – lock Aug 24 '10 at 7:54

If you just want to round down this is a more readable version using Java Time API:

LocalDateTime time = LocalDateTime.now();
LocalDateTime lastQuarter = time.truncatedTo(ChronoUnit.HOURS)
                                .plusMinutes(15 * (time.getMinute() / 15));

output:

2016-11-04T10:58:10.228

2016-11-04T10:45:00

  • 1
    By the way, LocalDateTime is the wrong class for actual moments, for a point on the timeline. Lacking any zone/offset concept, they are indefinite. Use same logic, but with ZonedDateTime.now(). – Basil Bourque Mar 18 at 20:59

It's simple, find the number of quaters since 1970 as double, round it and multiply by 15 minutes:

long timeMs = System.System.currentTimeMillis();

long roundedtimeMs = Math.round( (double)( (double)timeMs/(double)(15*60*1000) ) ) * (15*60*1000) );

Set your Date or Calendar object with that.

  • 1
    The parentheses do not match. I think the code should be: long timeMs = System.currentTimeMillis(); long roundedtimeMs = Math.round( (double)timeMs/(15*60*1000) ) * (15*60*1000); – jgrocha Apr 25 '17 at 14:19

With the answer above you end up with all kind of interesting code to handle overflows to hours, days etc.

I would use the time in ms since the epoch.

add 7.5minutes or 7.5x60x1000 = 450000

and truncate to a multiple of 900000

new Date(900000 * ((date.getTime() + 450000) / 900000))

This works, because the time where the ms time starts happens to be 00:00:00. And since all time zones in the world change in 15min steps, this does not affect rounding to quarters.

(Oops, I had a 0 too much and forgot some important parentheses : it is still too early)

  • Brute force approach, misses things like leap seconds. Although I agree there have to be many leap seconds to make a difference. – Sean Patrick Floyd Aug 24 '10 at 6:39
  • 4
    You are absolutely right, I did not consider leap seconds. However last time I checked, there was no support for leap seconds in java.util.Date, so people would set their computer clock to match wall time (or an atomic clock) and the JVM would calculated the wrong start of the epoch (off by the number of leap seconds). So in practice this would work and would save a bunch of tricky code, which also must deal with leap seconds. Conclusion : use ntp to keep your computer clock synchronised. – Peter Tillemans Aug 24 '10 at 6:50
  • 3
    "all time zones in the world change in 30min steps" - this isn't true for all time zones. There are time-zones that use incriments of 15 minutes. – B T Aug 31 '12 at 1:53
  • 1
    @BT I did not mean to sound argumentative. I'm just educating myself about this perplexing topic of date-time. Your link leads to an interesting article, thanks. – Basil Bourque May 31 '14 at 23:54
  • 1
    I didn't take it that way, and I didn't mean to sound that way either. I've legitimately forgotten the information that caused me to write my original comment – B T May 31 '14 at 23:57

A commented implementation for Java 8. Accepts arbitrary rounding units and increments:

 public static ZonedDateTime round(ZonedDateTime input, TemporalField roundTo, int roundIncrement) {
    /* Extract the field being rounded. */
    int field = input.get(roundTo);

    /* Distance from previous floor. */
    int r = field % roundIncrement;

    /* Find floor and ceiling. Truncate values to base unit of field. */
    ZonedDateTime ceiling = 
        input.plus(roundIncrement - r, roundTo.getBaseUnit())
        .truncatedTo(roundTo.getBaseUnit());

    ZonedDateTime floor = 
        input.plus(-r, roundTo.getBaseUnit())
        .truncatedTo(roundTo.getBaseUnit());

    /*
     * Do a half-up rounding.
     * 
     * If (input - floor) < (ceiling - input) 
     * (i.e. floor is closer to input than ceiling)
     *  then return floor, otherwise return ceiling.
     */
    return Duration.between(floor, input).compareTo(Duration.between(input, ceiling)) < 0 ? floor : ceiling;
  }

Source: myself

Wonderful post, thank you so much guys! It was exactly what I needed :)

Here's my code based on jour work.

My usecase is "Given it's 11:47 am, I want to set two dates symbolizing the current 5-minutes frame : 11:45 am and 11:50 am"

            Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
            calendar.set(Calendar.SECOND, 0);
            calendar.set(Calendar.MILLISECOND, 0);

            int modulo = calendar.get(Calendar.MINUTE) % 5;
            if(modulo > 0) {

                calendar.add(Calendar.MINUTE, -modulo);
            }

            myObject.setStartDate(calendar.getTime());

            calendar.add(Calendar.MINUTE, 5);
            myObject.setDueDate(calendar.getTime()); 
  • helped me to get a neat code @Iboix. small tweaks and i got my required datetime obj. thanks – parishodak Oct 14 '15 at 14:33

Maybe you can use an utility library for manipulating Dates, here for example you have a round method which can be useful for you:

http://commons.apache.org/lang/api-2.4/org/apache/commons/lang/time/DateUtils.html#round%28java.util.Calendar,%20int%29

Here an example in code:

    FastDateFormat formatter = DateFormatUtils.ISO_DATETIME_TIME_ZONE_FORMAT;

    Date now = new Date();
    System.out.println("now = " + formatter.format(now));       

    // Get nearest second
    Date nearestSecond = DateUtils.round(now, Calendar.SECOND);
    System.out.println("nearestSecond = " + formatter.format(nearestSecond));

    // Get nearest minute
    Date nearestMinute = DateUtils.round(now, Calendar.MINUTE);
    System.out.println("nearestMinute = " + formatter.format(nearestMinute));

    // Get nearest hour
    Date nearestHour   = DateUtils.round(now, Calendar.HOUR);
    System.out.println("nearestHour = " + formatter.format(nearestHour));
  • I know about these, but I don't think there is an out of the box solution here for 15 minute intervals – Sean Patrick Floyd Aug 24 '10 at 7:57

You can use this simple code...

int mode = min % 15;
if (mode > 15 / 2) {
    min = 15 - mode;
} else {
    min = 0 - mode;
}
cal.add(Calendar.MINUTE, min);
  • 1
    pretty much a longhand of the upvoted answer – lock Aug 24 '10 at 7:32
  • thanks for the hint where the 8 comes from (15/2). helped me to implement a version for other roundings like 5 minutes and so on! – 5im Jun 16 '14 at 23:21
public static Date getCurrentDateTimeWithQuarterRounding() {
    final Calendar calendar = new GregorianCalendar();
    calendar.setTime(new Date());
    calendar.set(Calendar.MILLISECOND, 0);
    calendar.set(Calendar.SECOND, 0);
    final int minutes = calendar.get(Calendar.MINUTE);

    if (minutes < 15) {
        calendar.set(Calendar.MINUTE, 0);
    } else if (minutes >= 45) {
        calendar.set(Calendar.MINUTE, 45);
    } else if (minutes < 30) {
        calendar.set(Calendar.MINUTE, 15);
    } else {
        calendar.set(Calendar.MINUTE, 30);
    }

    return calendar.getTime();
}

if you have the minutes you can round them with the following function:
int minutes = i % 15 < 8 ? i / 15 * 15 : (i / 15 + 1) * 15;

  • why so complicated? and why divide through float values when what you want is an integer result? – Sean Patrick Floyd Aug 24 '10 at 6:50
  • that was indeed bullshit ;) leftovers from a former approach – christian Aug 24 '10 at 7:18
minutes = (int) (Math.round(minutes / 15.0) * 15.0);

Using some code on I found on Stackoverflow, I have created the following code. It will output for every minute the quarter it will be rounded to.

import java.time.LocalDateTime;
import java.time.format.DateTimeFormatter;

DateTimeFormatter Datum_Format = DateTimeFormatter.ofPattern("HH:mm");

LocalDateTime time = LocalDateTime.now();
for(int i=0; i<=59; i++) {
  time = time.withMinute(i);
  int Minute = time.getMinute();
  int Quarter = 15 * (int) Math.round(Minute / 15);
  if (Quarter == 60) { 
    Time2 = time.plusHours(1);
    Time2 = Time2.withMinute(0); 
    LOG.info (Datum_Format.format(time) + "," + Datum_Format.format(Time2));
  }
  else {
    Time2 = time; 
    Time2 = Time2.withMinute(Quarter); 
    LOG.info (Datum_Format.format(time) + "," + Datum_Format.format(Time2));
  }
}

As I output the code to a console, you will have to replace the LOG.info with something like System.out.println.

Result:

2016-08-16 15:14:31 INFO 15:05,15:00
2016-08-16 15:14:31 INFO 15:06,15:00
2016-08-16 15:14:31 INFO 15:07,15:00
2016-08-16 15:14:31 INFO 15:08,15:15
2016-08-16 15:14:31 INFO 15:09,15:15
2016-08-16 15:14:31 INFO 15:10,15:15

  • please describe why this answer is better than other answers or what it does different and why – Florian Koch Aug 16 '16 at 13:34

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