3

I need to iterate over couple of key-value arrays (associative arrays) in bash. Here's my last attempt:

declare -A ARR1
ARR1[foo]=bar

declare -A ARR2
ARR2[foo]=baz

arrays=(ARR1 ARR2)

for idx in "${arrays[@]}"; do
    echo ${${idx}[foo]};
done 

which is wrong of course (syntax error), but at this moment, I have no other ideas how to deal with it. Whereas in the following example there are no errors, but the output is just a name of an array.

for idx in "${array[@]}"; do
    echo "${idx[foo]}";
done

------- OUTPUT -------
ARR1
ARR2

EDIT

Ok, I was able to do it by using eval:

eval echo \${${idx}[foo]};

However, I read that using eval in bash scripts is not such a good idea. Is there any better way?

2

Bash 4.3-alpha introduced the nameref attribute, which could be used in this case:

declare -A arr1=([foo]=bar)
declare -A arr2=([foo]=baz)
arrays=(arr1 arr2)

for idx in "${arrays[@]}"; do
    declare -n temp="$idx"
    echo "${temp[foo]}"
done

gives the output

bar
baz

As pointed out by kojiro in his comment, storing the array names in an array to iterate over is not actually required as long as the names have a shared prefix.

arrays=(arr1 arr2)

for idx in "${arrays[@]}"; do

could be replaced by

for idx in "${!arr@}"; do

Notice that despite the exclamation mark, this has nothing to do with indirect expansion.


Relevant excerpts from the reference manual

Section "Shell Parameters":

A variable can be assigned the nameref attribute using the -n option to the declare or local builtin commands (see Bash Builtins) to create a nameref, or a reference to another variable. This allows variables to be manipulated indirectly. Whenever the nameref variable is referenced or assigned to, the operation is actually performed on the variable specified by the nameref variable's value. A nameref is commonly used within shell functions to refer to a variable whose name is passed as an argument to the function. For instance, if a variable name is passed to a shell function as its first argument, running

declare -n ref=$1

inside the function creates a nameref variable ref whose value is the variable name passed as the first argument. References and assignments to ref are treated as references and assignments to the variable whose name was passed as $1.

If the control variable in a for loop has the nameref attribute, the list of words can be a list of shell variables, and a name reference will be established for each word in the list, in turn, when the loop is executed. Array variables cannot be given the -n attribute. However, nameref variables can reference array variables and subscripted array variables. Namerefs can be unset using the -n option to the unset builtin (see Bourne Shell Builtins). Otherwise, if unset is executed with the name of a nameref variable as an argument, the variable referenced by the nameref variable will be unset.

Section "Shell Parameter Expansion":

${!prefix*}
${!prefix@}

Expands to the names of variables whose names begin with prefix, separated by the first character of the IFS special variable. When @ is used and the expansion appears within double quotes, each variable name expands to a separate word.

  • It's not necessary to keep the names of the arrays in another array – as long as they have a unique name pattern you can reference them that way. In this case, something like ${!arr*} – kojiro Feb 21 '16 at 23:32
  • Isn't it the same option as @ffledgling provided but in the form of bash builtin? – kashpersky Feb 21 '16 at 23:33
  • @kashpersky They're similar, but not the same. The above mentioned mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/006 talks about some of it. Namerefs are proper references and can be used, for example, to more easily deal with arrays as positional parameters in functions. – Benjamin W. Feb 21 '16 at 23:38
  • Thank you @kojiro. ${!arr@} does the job:) – kashpersky Feb 21 '16 at 23:39
  • Namerefs are actually mentioned in that blog post, briefly. – kojiro Feb 21 '16 at 23:42
2

You can do this like with indirect substitution, but ideally you don't want to use bash for something like this if it's anything but a one-off script.

#!/bin/bash
set -ex

declare -A ARR1
ARR1[foo]=bar

declare -A ARR2
ARR2[foo]=baz

arrays=(ARR1 ARR2)

for idx in "${arrays[@]}"; do
  x="${idx}[foo]" # Store as a string in a variable
  echo ${!x} # Reference using indirection.
done 

See http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/006 for more info.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.