301

I have a variable.

abc:number|string;

How can I check its type? I want to do something like below:

if (abc.type === "number") {
    // do something
}

10 Answers 10

438

For :

abc:number|string;

Use the JavaScript operator typeof:

if (typeof abc === "number") {
    // do something
}

TypeScript understands typeof 🌹

This is called a typeguard.

More

For classes you would use instanceof e.g.

class Foo {}
class Bar {} 

// Later
if (fooOrBar instanceof Foo){
  // TypeScript now knows that `fooOrBar` is `Foo`
}

There are also other type guards e.g. in etc https://basarat.gitbook.io/typescript/type-system/typeguard

4
  • 14
    Added note on instanceof even though that wasn't the asked question.
    – basarat
    Sep 5, 2018 at 20:03
  • 3
    Doesn't answer the question. This doesn't get the type it confirms that it is or is not a type that you provide. Jan 8, 2023 at 2:30
  • It answers the question if you look at the given context/intent of the person asking the question...
    – DaVince
    Mar 24, 2023 at 11:25
  • What if the type is a function. ?
    – Sushant
    Jul 20, 2023 at 6:45
71

The other answers are right, but when you're dealing with interfaces you cannot use typeof or instanceof because interfaces don't get compiled to javascript.

Instead you can use a typecast + function check typeguard to check your variable:

interface Car {
    drive(): void;
    honkTheHorn(): void;
}

interface Bike {
    drive(): void;
    ringTheBell(): void;
}

function start(vehicle: Bike | Car ) {
    vehicle.drive();

    // typecast and check if the function exists
    if ((<Bike>vehicle).ringTheBell) {
        const bike = (<Bike>vehicle);
        bike.ringTheBell();
    } else {
        const car = (<Car>vehicle);
        car.honkTheHorn();
    }
}

And this is the compiled JavaScript in ES2017:

function start(vehicle) {
    vehicle.drive();
    if (vehicle.ringTheBell) {
        const bike = vehicle;
        bike.ringTheBell();
    }
    else {
        const car = vehicle;
        car.honkTheHorn();
    }
}
3
  • 6
    This is a very important distinction about interfaces vs classes! I wish there was a more idiomatic way to do this, but this suggestion works well.
    – Guss
    Aug 19, 2020 at 13:06
  • Question focusing on interface property types
    – cachius
    Sep 1, 2022 at 15:32
  • can you do this in tsx file? React is expecting <Bike> to be an component, not a TS type.
    – jcollum
    Jan 25, 2023 at 0:57
54

I'd like to add that TypeGuards only work on strings or numbers, if you want to compare an object use instanceof

if(task.id instanceof UUID) {
  //foo
}
1
  • 18
    True. Worth noting that you can do this with classes but not with TypeScript interfaces or types, because they don't exist in the exported JavaScript file. Jul 9, 2019 at 3:06
15

I suspect you can adjust your approach a little and use something along the lines of the example here:

https://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/2/narrowing.html#using-type-predicates

function isFish(pet: Fish | Bird): pet is Fish {
  return (pet as Fish).swim !== undefined;
}
1
14

I have checked a variable if it is a boolean or not as below

console.log(isBoolean(this.myVariable));

Similarly we have

isNumber(this.myVariable);
isString(this.myvariable);

and so on.

3
  • 1
    worked for me, but just for knowing types!!, custom types have to use instanceof
    – Carlos.V
    May 17, 2019 at 16:38
  • 4
    You'll need to import util to access these functions (e.g., import { isString } from 'util';
    – 2Toad
    Aug 16, 2019 at 23:47
  • 4
    Depricated now , use if (typeof value === 'string') instead
    – Monir Khan
    Apr 30, 2020 at 11:20
10

Type guards in typescript

To determine the type of a variable after a conditional statement you can use type guards. A type guard in typescript is the following:

An expression which allows you to narrow down the type of something within a conditional block.

In other words it is an expression within a conditional block from where the typescript compiler has enough information to narrow down the type. The type will be more specific within the block of the type guard because the compiler has inferred more information about the type.

Example

declare let abc: number | string;

// typeof abc === 'string' is a type guard
if (typeof abc === 'string') {
    // abc: string
    console.log('abc is a string here')
} else {
    // abc: number, only option because the previous type guard removed the option of string
    console.log('abc is a number here')
}

Besides the typeof operator there are built in type guards like instanceof, in and even your own type guards.

2
3

type of can be used for this

if (typeof abc === "number") {
    // number
} else if (typeof abc === "string"){
//string
}
1

since Typescript 4.4 you can do like bellow:

function foo(arg: unknown) {
    const argIsString = typeof arg === "string";
    if (argIsString) {
        console.log(arg.toUpperCase());
    }
}
1

Here's a way to do it if your variable's type is a union that includes multiple object interfaces that you want to decide between:

interface A {
  a: number;
}

interface B {
  b: boolean;
}

let x: string | A | B = /* ... */;

if (typeof x === 'string') {
  // x: string
} else if ('a' in x) {
  // x: A
} else if ('b' in x) {
  // x: B
}

If you want to make sure that you handled every option, you can add an exhaustiveness check. Once you've handled every option, TypeScript will notice that there are no remaining types the variable could possibly be at this point. It expresses this by giving it the never type.

If we add a final else branch that requires the variable to be the never type, we'll be proving to the type checker (and to ourselves) that this branch will never be called:

// As long as a variable never holds a type it's not supposed to,
// this function will never actually be called.
function exhaustiveCheck(param: never): never {
  throw Error('exhaustiveCheck got called somehow');
}

if (typeof x === 'string') {
  // x: string
} else if ('a' in x) {
  // x: A
} else if ('b' in x) {
  // x: B
} else {
  // x: never
  exhaustiveCheck(x);
}

If you forget to handle a case, you'll get a type error:

if (typeof x === 'string') {
  // x: string
} else if ('b' in x) {
  // x: B
} else {
  // x: A
  exhaustiveCheck(x); // TYPE ERROR: Argument of type 'A' is not
                      // assignable to parameter of type 'never'.
}
0

I have searched a lot how to check if my string variable is equal to my type and didn't found anything meaningful because any type of interface is not exist in runtime. So we need have this in runtime. There is solution that I figure out for my case.

type MyType = 'one'|'two';
function isMyType(val: string): val is MyType {
    const list:MyType[] = ['one','two'];
    return list.includes(val as MyType);
}
...
const incomingValue = 'one';
if(isMyType(incomingValue)) {
    // here typescript see incomingValue as MyType
}

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