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I've tried searching the internet for the execution order of imported modules. For instance, let's say I have the following code:

import "one"
import "two"
console.log("three");

Where one.js and two.js are defined as follows:

// one.js
console.log("one");

// two.js
console.log("two");

Is the console output guaranteed to be:

one
two
three

Or is it undefined?

2
  • import is sync, so the output order is guaranteed. the console showing stuff is technically async, but that doesn't matter because it's buffered.
    – dandavis
    Commented Feb 22, 2016 at 11:05
  • 1
    Regardless of the answer, the rule of thumb is: Whenever you require a certain evaluation order, explicitly declare your dependencies with an import.
    – Bergi
    Commented Feb 23, 2016 at 20:56

2 Answers 2

51

JavaScript modules are evaluated asynchronously. However, all imports are evaluated prior to the body of module doing the importing. This makes JavaScript modules different from CommonJS modules in Node or <script> tags without the async attribute. JavaScript modules are closer to the AMD spec when it comes to how they are loaded. For more detail, see section 16.6.1 of Exploring ES6 by Axel Rauschmayer.

Thus, in the example provided by the questioner, the order of execution cannot be guaranteed. There are two possible outcomes. We might see this in the console:

one
two
three

Or we might see this:

two
one
three

In other words, the two imported modules could execute their console.log() calls in any order; they are asynchronous with respect to one another. But they will definitely be executed prior to the body of the module that imports them, so "three" is guaranteed to be logged last.

The asynchronicity of modules can be observed when using top-level await statements (now implemented in Chrome). For example, suppose we modify the questioner's example slightly:

// main.js
import './one.js';
import './two.js';
console.log('three');

// one.js
await new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(resolve, 1000));
console.log('one');

// two.js
console.log('two');

When we run main.js, we see the following in the console (with timestamps added for illustration):

[0s] two
[1s] one
[1s] three

Update as of ES2020

Per petamoriken's answer, it looks like evaluation order is guaranteed for non-async modules as of ES2020. So, if you know none of the modules you're importing contain top-level await statements, they will be executed in the order in which they are imported. In the case of the questioner's example, the console output will always be:

one
two
three
12
  • 4
    Any reference on "Imported ES6 modules are executed asynchronously."? Commented Feb 23, 2016 at 13:47
  • 3
    As far as I know, ES2015 modules are not imported asynchronously, rather - how they load is up to the module loader entirely. Commented Feb 23, 2016 at 13:48
  • 1
    @BenjaminGruenbaum I can only quote my own answer: "For more detail, see section 16.6.1 of Exploring ES6 by Axel Rauschmayer."
    – McMath
    Commented Feb 23, 2016 at 13:49
  • 2
    @BenjaminGruenbaum Yes, that's why I add the caveat that "no modern browser implements ES6 modules. I don't know if transpilers such as Babel follow the original specification in this respect." I suspect that most such transpilers do import synchronously, as you suggest. But my answer is about the original specification.
    – McMath
    Commented Feb 23, 2016 at 13:53
  • 3
    I'm actually a reviewer of that book. The point I'm making is that it's not up to the ES module spec to decide it - it's up to the module loaded spec to decide how to load the modules. IIRC the spec only requires that all the modules are loaded when code executes. Commented Feb 23, 2016 at 14:13
10

According to the latest specification InnerModuleEvaluation, the order of module.ExecuteModule() is guaranteed since [[RequestedModules]] is an ordered list of source code occurrences.

// 16.2.1.5.2.1 rough sketch
function InnerModuleEvaluation(module, stack, index) {

  // ...

  // 8
  module.[[PendingAsyncDependencies]] = 0;

  // ...

  // 11: resolve dependencies (source code occurrences order)
  for (required of module.[[RequestedModules]]) {
    let requiredModule = HostResolveImportedModule(module, required);
    // **recursive**
    InnerModuleEvaluation(requiredModule, stack, index);

    // ...

    if (requiredModule.[[AsyncEvaluation]]) {
      ++module.[[PendingAsyncDependencies]];
    }
  }

  // 12: execute
  if (module.[[PendingAsyncDependencies]] > 0 || module.[[HasTLA]]) {
    module.[[AsyncEvaluation]] = true;
    if (module.[[PendingAsyncDependencies]] === 0) {
      ExecuteAsyncModule(module);
    }
  } else {
    module.ExecuteModule();
  }

  // ...

}

The console output is always as follows:

one
two
three
2
  • This is correct as of ES020 for non-async modules.
    – McMath
    Commented Nov 27, 2021 at 3:37
  • This is correct, although there is a subtle point, and that's that if there are multiple entries into the module graph, two and three may already have been imported. In which case just printing three is possible, although in that case one,two have still been printed first, however they may have printed arbitrarily far in the past. One implication here is that two,one,three is a possible order if there is a different entry point (although three is still always last). Commented Mar 22, 2022 at 23:35

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