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I am working with the Contoso University tutorial and was trying it with both a modular attempt (separate projects for Models, DAL and WebUI - top picture in the attached picture) and a single project (containing all layers - bottom picture). In both cases the solution compiles without errors. However when I go to the details section for a student in web browser the modular project throws an error when I go to the second break point, starting:

Exception Details:

System.NullReferenceException: Object reference not set to an instance of an object.

The same model is passed into the view for each project,

@model ContosoUniversity.Models.Student

And a null reference exception occurs after the line:

@foreach (var item in Model.Enrollments){ 

I thought it may have been a namespace conflict between the ContosoUniversity.Models project and the Models folder in the ContosoUniversity project, however renaming the folder doesn't resolve this. Is there something else related to multiple projects that would cause a null value (Enrollments.cs not being sent to the model) to be encountered here, but not for a single project? If its something deeper in the code I can follow up with full view-code and model classes.

Screenshot of working and non working solutions in VS2015Community

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  • show your action method – Shyju Feb 22 '16 at 14:12
4

Since this is such a commonly confusing error to new developers, I've authored a post on my blog to explain what the error means in detail and how to debug it. TL;DR: Object reference not set to an instance of an object is a runtime error (hence why your project compiles fine) that occurs when you're expecting a variable to be an instance of a particular class, but it actually resolves to null at runtime.

This commonly occurs when you're selecting an object from a database, but nothing matches, or you've neglected to initialize a property on your model that requires initialization, like a list. Based on the line of code you've posted, my guess is that either the model itself is null (perhaps because it's coming from the database and you're not checking for null before sending it to the view), or the Enrollments property is null because you've neglected to initialize it, or it's not marked as virtual if your model is an instance of an entity class.

Whenever you request a specific object from the database, you should always check for null and handle appropriately. For example, if you're working on a "detail" action, your code should look something like:

public ActionResult Detail(int id)
{
    var foo = db.Foos.Find(id); // potentially null, if no matching id
    if (foo == null)
    {
        return new HttpNotFoundResult();
    }

    return View(foo);
}

If you have a list-style property on your model, you should always initialize it via the class constructor or a custom getter:

public class Foo
{
    public Foo()
    {
        Bars = new List<Bar>();
    }

    public List<Bar> Bars { get; set; }
}

Or

public class Foo
{
    private List<Bar> bars;
    public List<Bar> Bars
    {
        get
        {
            if (bars == null)
            {
                bars = new List<Bar>();
            }
            return bars;
        }
        set { bars = value; }
    }
}

If you're utilizing C# 6, the last one can be simplified to:

public class Foo
{
    public List<Bar> Bars { get; set; } = new List<Bars>();
}

Finally, this is not necessary if you're dealing with an Entity Framework POCO, as long as the property is virtual:

public virtual ICollection<Bar> Bars { get; set; }

As part of the lazy-loading facility, Entity Framework automatically overrides the property such that it will never be null, only an empty collection if there's truly nothing there. However, if you neglect the virtual keyword, EF cannot do the necessary override to handle this.

Long and short, you need to figure out what variable is null that you're expecting to have an actual value, and then either do proper null-checking (which is a good idea regardless) or figure out why it's null instead of the value you expect.

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