17

I'm pretty new to java-/type-script and I've some troubles grasping their concepts. I would like to call a method of another class. However, I've been unsuccessful so far.

export class Foo {
   calcSomeThing(parameter:number): number {
      //stuff
   }
}

class Bar {
   var foo:Foo = new Foo();

   calcOtherThing() {
      result = foo.calcSomething(parameter)
   }
}

What is the correct way to call calcSomething on foo from calcOtherThing?


edit: added an instance of foo

4
  • You need an instance of class Foo first. I don't want to just tell you how to do it, this (object-oriented, class-based) programming is a very broad topic. There is a LOT of information on this style-- it's not just Java and TypeScript. I would start at the basics.
    – Antiga
    Commented Feb 22, 2016 at 15:28
  • I added an instance of Foo to my code. Commented Feb 22, 2016 at 15:31
  • 3
    You access instance members with this.. So, this.foo.
    – Antiga
    Commented Feb 22, 2016 at 15:32
  • Well, forgetting about this this thing was pretty dumb. Thank you all. Commented Feb 22, 2016 at 16:04

5 Answers 5

22

There are several problems with your code.

  1. Typescript is case sensitive. So "calcSomething" and "calcSomeThing" are two different methods.
  2. The only way to access cals methods and properties is through "this" keyword: this.foo
  3. To define class property use private/protected/public modifier. Or no modifier at all (that will be the same as public). So no things like "var foo" in the class body.

Taking this into account the fixed code would look like this:

export class Foo 
{
    calcSomeThing(parameter:number): number 
    {
        //Stuff
    }
}

class Bar 
{
    private foo:Foo = new Foo();

    calcOtherThing(parameter: number): number 
    {
            return this.foo.calcSomeThing(parameter)
    }
}
9

calcSomeThing is a non-static method/function. Create an instance of Foo to be able to call it:

let foo:Foo = new Foo();
let result:number = foo.calcSomeThing( parameter );

Never use var in Typescript - let is your friend.

3
  • The let keyword is impressive. Thank you very much! Commented Feb 22, 2016 at 16:05
  • 1
    A typescript linter gives you much more information about your code and helps you to write valuable code (e.g. forbids to use var). It's hard to understand everything a linter wants you to change, but you'll be impressed by the results
    – dex
    Commented Feb 22, 2016 at 16:11
  • "Never use var in Typescript - let is your friend." - Now I will remember this my whole life. Thanks for this catch phrase.
    – Tanzeel
    Commented Jul 24, 2021 at 10:30
3

I believe you need a constructor for classes in TypeScript. In the example I provide I made mine data holders, but it's not required. Additionally, your calculation functions need to return values. Also, in order to use Foo in an instance of Bar, you need to make an instance of Foo.

class Foo {
   private data; 
   constructor(data: number) {
       this.data = data;
   }

   calcSomeThing(parameter:number): number {
      return parameter + 1;
   }
}

class Bar {
   private data;
   private foo:Foo = new Foo(3);

   constructor(data: number) {
       this.data = data;
   };

   calcOtherThing(): number {
      let result = this.foo.calcSomeThing(this.data);
      return result;     
   }
}

let bar = new Bar(5);
console.log(bar.calcOtherThing()); // returns 6
2

It may not be right for all situations, but for the angular app I'm working on, I'm been using a service - here's what angular says about them. You can then call them like this:

smile.service.ts

export class SmileService {

  addSmileMethod(input: string): string {
    return input + ' :)';
  }

}

smile-component.ts

import { SmileService } from './path/to/smile.service';

export class SmileComponent {

  constructor(private smileService: SmileService) { }

  ngOnInit() {
    // Using the service
    const smileString = this.smileService.addSmileMethod('Hello!');
    console.log(smileString);

    // Output is:
    // Hello! :)
  }

}
0

Here's another example, but with a shared exported method.

a.ts:

export function sharedMethod(a, b, c) { return a + b + c }

export default class A {
   constructor(a, b, c) {
       this.concat = sharedMethod(a,b,c);
   };
}

And in b.ts:

import { sharedMethod } from './a'

export default class B {
   constructor(a, b, c) {
       this.concat = sharedMethod(a,b,c)
   };
}

and in c.ts:

import './a'
import './b'
new A('hello', 'world', '!')
new B('hello', 'world', '!')

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.