Let's say a class has been defined as

class A {
//.....
};

and now I am creating two objects as

A a,b;

In what order are a and b created? Is it defined by the standard?

  • 13
    The comma in a declaration is not the comma operator, it's merely a separator. – Some programmer dude Feb 22 '16 at 18:28
  • 13
    In this case it is not the comma operator. – NathanOliver Feb 22 '16 at 18:29
  • 4
    @Zakkery But it does not answer in which order are the objects initialized. – NathanOliver Feb 22 '16 at 18:33
  • 18
    @donjuedo ..I can test it but I wouldn't know if the result is implementation dependent or not – pasha Feb 22 '16 at 18:34
  • 5
    @donjuedo Not if the answer quotes the standard. ;) – NathanOliver Feb 22 '16 at 18:39
up vote 78 down vote accepted

From 8 Declarators [dcl.decl] 3:

Each init-declarator in a declaration is analyzed separately as if it was in a declaration by itself.

It goes on to say

A declaration with several declarators is usually equivalent to the corresponding sequence of declarations each with a single declarator. That is T D1, D2, ... Dn; is usually equivalent to T D1; T D2; ... T Dn; where T is a decl-specifier-seq and each Di is an init-declarator. An exception occurs when a name introduced by one of the declarators hides a type name used by the decl-specifiers, so that when the same decl-specifiers are used in a subsequent declaration, they do not have the same meaning.

You can say that they are constructed from left to right.

  • 8
    Beat me by 45 seconds :-) – Nemo Feb 22 '16 at 18:37
  • 2
    @pasha T D1,D2=D1; becomes T D1; T D2=D1; by the rules so yes. – NathanOliver Feb 22 '16 at 18:42
  • 8
    Well, it says 'usually'. – SergeyA Feb 22 '16 at 18:42
  • 6
    @erip It would call the copy constructor for D2. Not the copy assignment operator. – Brian Feb 23 '16 at 1:17
  • 3
    @HagenvonEitzen: Main example is when a variable has the same name as the type. S S,T; works; S S; S T; is an error. Newer example is auto x=1; auto y=2.0; works; auto x=1,y=2.0; is an error. Those are the only examples the footnote provides. So "usually" is, if anything, a bit of an understatement. – Nemo Feb 23 '16 at 18:21

C++ spec chapter 8 [dcl.decl], says:

Each init-declarator in a declaration is analyzed separately as if it was in a declaration by itself. (100)

Footnote (100) goes on to say:

(100) A declaration with several declarators is usually equivalent to the corresponding sequence of declarations each with a single declarator. That is

T D1, D2, ... Dn;

is usually equivalent to

 T D1; T D2; ... T Dn;

...and then names some exceptions, none of which apply in such simple cases.

So the answer to your question is that the objects are constructed in the order you list them. And no, it is not a comma operator.

  • 7
    How do you understand 'usually' in this context? – SergeyA Feb 22 '16 at 18:43
  • 8
    @SergeyA By reading the exceptions in which case 'usually' becomes 'no' then taking the complement for the affirmative. :) – erip Feb 22 '16 at 18:43
  • 4
    @erip, quite a process :) – SergeyA Feb 22 '16 at 18:45
  • 4
    @SergeyA As I'm sure you know, that's the name of the game when writing C++. ;D – erip Feb 22 '16 at 18:46

The order is the written order, from left to right. Also, it's not the comma operator, but simply a list of declarators. When a user-defined comma operator is used, order is in fact unspecified.

See comma operator and declarators.

a will be created first and then b.

Commas in this case will be used as separators and not as operators.

For example from wikipedia :

    /**
      *  Commas act as separators in this line, not as an operator.
      *  Results: a=1, b=2, c=3, i=0
      */
     int a=1, b=2, c=3, i=0;

Standards:

Declarators [dcl.decl]:
Each init-declarator in a declaration is analyzed separately as if it was in a declaration by itself.

Example:

class A {
public:
    A(std::string const &s): name(s) 
    { 
        std::cout << "I am " << name << '\n'; 
    }
    std::string name;
};

auto main() -> int
{
    A a("a"), b("b");
}

Output:

I am a
I am b
  • 3
    This code isn't really a proof that this is true. The standard quote is. – erip Feb 22 '16 at 22:04

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.