44

Consider two classes.

public class File
{
    [Key]
    public string Id { get; set; }

    public string Message_Id { get; set; }

    internal Message Message { get; set; }
}

public class Message 
{
    [Key]
    public string Id { get; set; }       
}

In EF6, for N : 1..0 relation there was this fluent API.

modelBuilder.Entity<File>()
            .HasOptional(e => e.Message ).WithMany().HasForeignKey(e => e.Message_Id);

What is equivalent in Entiity Framework Core 1?

Thank you

70

You will not find an equivalent method in EF 7. By convention, a property whose CLR type can contain null will be configured as optional. So what decide if the relationship is optional or not is if the FK property is nullable or not respectively.

In summary, due to your Message_Id FK property is string, it already accepts null value, so if you use the following Fluent Api configuration:

modelBuilder.Entity<File>()
            .HasOne(s => s.Message)
            .WithMany()
            .HasForeignKey(e => e.Message_Id)

EF will configure your relationship as optional (or N : 0..1 as requested).

In case of your FK property is value type like int, you should declare it as nullable (int?).

Also I noticed now you have a navigation property with internal access modifier. You should always declare your entity properties as public.

  • Just to add an observation: EF will also configure the relationship as required given a [Required] annotation on the property, even if the type itself is nullable. – davidmdem Aug 16 '17 at 14:15
  • Don't think this is true. EF6 AND EF Core are both capable of representing 1 : 0..1 relationships as EntityA.PK is foreign key to EntityB.PK – shannon Sep 6 '17 at 17:38
  • @shannon Take a look in this link and show me in fluent api how to do an HasOptional without do what I explain in my answer – octavioccl Sep 6 '17 at 17:43
  • 1
    My apologies for that. I will take your advice in the future – octavioccl Sep 6 '17 at 18:29
  • 2
    You should always declare your entity properties as public. This is incorrect. If you have something you don't want exposed outside of your class, you can declare it as protected internal so that Entity Framework can still work with the property, but it can't be accessed by anything else. – krillgar Oct 8 '18 at 12:27
8

In EF Core you can use two ways for relating two tables:

  • Inside OnModelCreating:

    protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);            
    
        modelBuilder.Entity<File>()
                    .HasOne(c => c.Message)
                    .WithOne()
                    .HasForeignKey(c => c.MessageId)                           
    }
    
  • Create new class FileConfiguration and calling it inside OnModelCreating:

    public class FileConfiguration : IEntityTypeConfiguration<File>
    {
        public void Configure(EntityTypeBuilder<File> builder)
        {           
            builder.ToTable("File");            
    
            // Id
            builder.HasKey(c => c.Id);
            builder.Property(c => c.Id)
                   .ValueGeneratedOnAdd();
    
            // Message
            builder.HasOne(c => c.Message)
                   .WithOne(c => c.File)
                   .HasForeignKey<Message>(c => c.MessageId)
                   .OnDelete(DeleteBehavior.Restrict);
        }
    }
    

    and inside OnModelCreating put below codes:

    protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);
    
        modelBuilder.ApplyConfiguration(new FileConfiguration());                                       
    }
    

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