25

I am looking for a module in sklearn that lets you derive the word-word co-occurrence matrix.

I can get the document-term matrix but not sure how to go about obtaining a word-word matrix of co-ocurrences.

1
  • Could you add some data and your attempts to tackle the problem?
    – Cleb
    Feb 22 '16 at 22:33
37

Here is my example solution using CountVectorizer in scikit-learn. And referring to this post, you can simply use matrix multiplication to get word-word co-occurrence matrix.

from sklearn.feature_extraction.text import CountVectorizer
docs = ['this this this book',
        'this cat good',
        'cat good shit']
count_model = CountVectorizer(ngram_range=(1,1)) # default unigram model
X = count_model.fit_transform(docs)
# X[X > 0] = 1 # run this line if you don't want extra within-text cooccurence (see below)
Xc = (X.T * X) # this is co-occurrence matrix in sparse csr format
Xc.setdiag(0) # sometimes you want to fill same word cooccurence to 0
print(Xc.todense()) # print out matrix in dense format

You can also refer to dictionary of words in count_model,

count_model.vocabulary_

Or, if you want to normalize by diagonal component (referred to answer in previous post).

import scipy.sparse as sp
Xc = (X.T * X)
g = sp.diags(1./Xc.diagonal())
Xc_norm = g * Xc # normalized co-occurence matrix

Extra to note @Federico Caccia answer, if you don't want co-occurrence that are spurious from the own text, set occurrence that is greater that 1 to 1 e.g.

X[X > 0] = 1 # do this line first before computing cooccurrence
Xc = (X.T * X)
...
1
  • What if we want to change the window size. changing ngram also changes the word pairs
    – Imran
    May 9 at 15:14
11

All the provided answers didn't use the window-moving concept into consideration. So, I did my own function that does find the co-occurrence matrix by applying a moving window of a defined size.

This function takes a list of sentences and a window_size number; and it returns a pandas.DataFrame object representing the co-occurrence matrix:

from collections import defaultdict

def co_occurrence(sentences, window_size):
    d = defaultdict(int)
    vocab = set()
    for text in sentences:
        # preprocessing (use tokenizer instead)
        text = text.lower().split()
        # iterate over sentences
        for i in range(len(text)):
            token = text[i]
            vocab.add(token)  # add to vocab
            next_token = text[i+1 : i+1+window_size]
            for t in next_token:
                key = tuple( sorted([t, token]) )
                d[key] += 1
    
    # formulate the dictionary into dataframe
    vocab = sorted(vocab) # sort vocab
    df = pd.DataFrame(data=np.zeros((len(vocab), len(vocab)), dtype=np.int16),
                      index=vocab,
                      columns=vocab)
    for key, value in d.items():
        df.at[key[0], key[1]] = value
        df.at[key[1], key[0]] = value
    return df

Let's try it out given the following two simple sentences:

>>> text = ["I go to school every day by bus .",
            "i go to theatre every night by bus"]
>>> 
>>> df = co_occurrence(text, 2)
>>> df
         .  bus  by  day  every  go  i  night  school  theatre  to
.        0    1   1    0      0   0  0      0       0        0   0
bus      1    0   2    1      0   0  0      1       0        0   0
by       1    2   0    1      2   0  0      1       0        0   0
day      0    1   1    0      1   0  0      0       1        0   0
every    0    0   2    1      0   0  0      1       1        1   2
go       0    0   0    0      0   0  2      0       1        1   2
i        0    0   0    0      0   2  0      0       0        0   2
night    0    1   1    0      1   0  0      0       0        1   0
school   0    0   0    1      1   1  0      0       0        0   1
theatre  0    0   0    0      1   1  0      1       0        0   1
to       0    0   0    0      2   2  2      0       1        1   0

[11 rows x 11 columns]

Now, we have our co-occurrence matrix.

4
  • What is defaultdict(int)
    – Imran
    May 9 at 15:15
  • it's a dictionary with a default datatype for its values. You can import it like so: from collections import defaultdict. So, defaultdict(int) is a dictionary with int values. The only difference between this and the normal dictionaries is that defaultdict doesn't raise KeyError when the key isn't found. That's why I used it.
    – Anwarvic
    May 9 at 16:25
  • there are every day by bus and every night by bus occurrences of every and bus together, then why co-occurrence matrix has 0 for every and bus? Aug 3 at 5:50
  • 1
    @GuruVishnuVardhanReddy, here I'm using a moving window of size 2 which means that for each word at index i, I will consider just the words at indices i-1, i-2, i+1, and i+2. That's why the value of (to, every) is 2 while the value of (to, bus) is 0. Hope this helps.
    – Anwarvic
    Aug 3 at 17:36
4

@titipata I think your solution is not a good metric because we are giving the same weight to real co-ocurrences and to occurrences that are just spurious. For example, if I have 5 texts and the words apple and house appears with this frecuency:

text1: apple:10, "house":1

text2: apple:10, "house":0

text3: apple:10, "house":0

text4: apple:10, "house":0

text5: apple:10, "house":0

The co-occurrence we are going to measure is 10*1+10*0+10*0+10*0+10*0=10, but is just spurious.

And, in this another important cases, like the following:

text1: apple:1, "banana":1

text2: apple:1, "banana":1

text3: apple:1, "banana":1

text4: apple:1, "banana":1

text5: apple:1, "banana":1

we are going to get just a co-occurrence of 1*1+1*1+1*1+1*1=5, when in fact that co-occurrence really important.

@Guiem Bosch In this case co-occurrences are measured only when the two words are contiguous.

I propose to use something the @titipa solution to compute the matrix:

Xc = (Y.T * Y) # this is co-occurrence matrix in sparse csr format

where, instead of using X, use a matrix Y with ones in positions greater than 0 and zeros in another positions.

Using this, in the first example we are going to have: co-occurrence:1*1+1*0+1*0+1*0+1*0=1 and in the second example: co-occurrence:1*1+1*1+1*1+1*1+1*0=5 which is what we are really looking for.

1
  • Hi @Federico Caccia, thanks for the catch! I already note at the end of my solution.
    – titipata
    Jun 7 '18 at 19:22
2

You can use the ngram_range parameter in the CountVectorizer or TfidfVectorizer

Code example:

bigram_vectorizer = CountVectorizer(ngram_range=(2, 2)) # by saying 2,2 you are telling you only want pairs of 2 words

In case you want to explicitly say which co-occurrences of words you want to count, use the vocabulary param, i.e: vocabulary = {'awesome unicorns':0, 'batman forever':1}

http://scikit-learn.org/stable/modules/generated/sklearn.feature_extraction.text.CountVectorizer.html

Self-explanatory and ready to use code with predefined word-word co-occurrences. In this case we are tracking for co-occurrences of awesome unicorns and batman forever:

from sklearn.feature_extraction.text import CountVectorizer
import numpy as np
samples = ['awesome unicorns are awesome','batman forever and ever','I love batman forever']
bigram_vectorizer = CountVectorizer(ngram_range=(1, 2), vocabulary = {'awesome unicorns':0, 'batman forever':1}) 
co_occurrences = bigram_vectorizer.fit_transform(samples)
print 'Printing sparse matrix:', co_occurrences
print 'Printing dense matrix (cols are vocabulary keys 0-> "awesome unicorns", 1-> "batman forever")', co_occurrences.todense()
sum_occ = np.sum(co_occurrences.todense(),axis=0)
print 'Sum of word-word occurrences:', sum_occ
print 'Pretty printig of co_occurrences count:', zip(bigram_vectorizer.get_feature_names(),np.array(sum_occ)[0].tolist())

Final output is ('awesome unicorns', 1), ('batman forever', 2), which corresponds exactly to our samples provided data.

1

with numpy, as corpus would be list of lists (each list a tokenized document):

corpus = [['<START>', 'All', 'that', 'glitters', "isn't", 'gold', '<END>'], 
          ['<START>', "All's", 'well', 'that', 'ends', 'well', '<END>']]

and a word->row/col mapping

def compute_co_occurrence_matrix(corpus, window_size):

    words = sorted(list(set([word for words_list in corpus for word in words_list])))
    num_words = len(words)

    M = np.zeros((num_words, num_words))
    word2Ind = dict(zip(words, range(num_words)))

    for doc in corpus:

        cur_idx = 0
        doc_len = len(doc)

        while cur_idx < doc_len:

            left = max(cur_idx-window_size, 0)
            right = min(cur_idx+window_size+1, doc_len)
            words_to_add = doc[left:cur_idx] + doc[cur_idx+1:right]
            focus_word = doc[cur_idx]

            for word in words_to_add:
                outside_idx = word2Ind[word]
                M[outside_idx, word2Ind[focus_word]] += 1

            cur_idx += 1

    return M, word2Ind
0

I used the below code for creating co-occurrance matrix with window size:

#https://stackoverflow.com/questions/4843158/check-if-a-python-list-item-contains-a-string-inside-another-string
import pandas as pd
def co_occurance_matrix(input_text,top_words,window_size):
    co_occur = pd.DataFrame(index=top_words, columns=top_words)

    for row,nrow in zip(top_words,range(len(top_words))):
        for colm,ncolm in zip(top_words,range(len(top_words))):        
            count = 0
            if row == colm: 
                co_occur.iloc[nrow,ncolm] = count
            else: 
                for single_essay in input_text:
                    essay_split = single_essay.split(" ")
                    max_len = len(essay_split)
                    top_word_index = [index for index, split in enumerate(essay_split) if row in split]
                    for index in top_word_index:
                        if index == 0:
                            count = count + essay_split[:window_size + 1].count(colm)
                        elif index == (max_len -1): 
                            count = count + essay_split[-(window_size + 1):].count(colm)
                        else:
                            count = count + essay_split[index + 1 : (index + window_size + 1)].count(colm)
                            if index < window_size: 
                                count = count + essay_split[: index].count(colm)
                            else:
                                count = count + essay_split[(index - window_size): index].count(colm)
                co_occur.iloc[nrow,ncolm] = count

    return co_occur

then i used the below code to perform test:

corpus = ['ABC DEF IJK PQR','PQR KLM OPQ','LMN PQR XYZ ABC DEF PQR ABC']
words = ['ABC','PQR','DEF']
window_size =2 

result = co_occurance_matrix(corpus,words,window_size)
result

Output is here: enter image description here

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