4

Given an array a = {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8}

We should bring all the odd place elements(1,3,5,7) together and even place elements(2,4,6,8) together while preserving the order.

Input : [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]. Output : [1,3,5,7,2,4,6,8].

Update:(Example 2) Example 2 : [3,54,77,86,45,2,25,100] Output : [3, 77, 45, 25, 54, 86, 2, 100]

Restrictions: O(N) time complexity and O(1) space complexity.

My approach : 1. partitioning it like in (quicksort partition) Problem : the order is not preserved. ( 1,7,3,5,4,6,2,8) -O(N) time complex 2. Putting the odd element to the rightful position and shifting all the other elements : Problem : It comes to O(N) for each element and shifting takes another O(N). So the time complexity becomes O(N^2)

Is there a O(N) time complex and O(1) space complex solution possible?

  • 1
    Your example data is already sorted and contains no duplicates. Are either of these conditions known to hold for the general case? – Esoteric Screen Name Feb 22 '16 at 23:43
  • Your question is not clear. For O(1) space restriction, that means you can't have input or output sequence in your program in any list or array form, only some sort of 'input' and 'output' stream. If you can re-read, or random access the input, then the problem is trivial. If you can't, it has no solution, as you must keep O(N) elements to the point where you can output the first even-place element. – deniss Feb 23 '16 at 0:22
  • @deniss: I think O(1) in this case means constant in the size of the input, e.g. you can have a constant number of variables, but you can't, say, copy the array. So it must be in-place. What's the trivial solution then assuming you can random access the input? – Claudiu Feb 23 '16 at 1:27
  • 1
    @Claudiu, thanks, got it now. More formal, the problem is: for number N, produce a sequence of swaps, which transforms [1,...,N] into [1,3 ... N/2, 2, 4 ... N/2+1], in O(1) space and O(N) time. – deniss Feb 23 '16 at 3:02
  • 2
    @Claudiu : It means to take the odd elements(not indices) in order appeneded with even elements to it. But initially he said odd elements stay in odd places and even elements stay at even indices. – NPK Feb 24 '16 at 19:53
3

See if you can generalize either of these permutation solutions based on cycles, noting that sorted indices would be I[] = {0,2,4,6,1,3,5,7}, I[1] = 2, I[2] = 4, I[4] = 1 , end of cycle. I[3] = 6, I[6] = 5, I[5] = 3, end of cycle. The issue here is if n is not known in advance, then even though I[i] can be calculated on the fly (I[i] = (2*i < n) ? 2*i : (2*i-n) | 1; ), the issue is keeping track of which cycles have already been processed, which could require O(n) space.

For 8 elements, it's two cycles, 3 elements each:

             0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
       I[] = 0 2 4 6 1 3 5 7

   t = a[1]  2
a[1] = a[2]  1 3 3 4 5 6 7 8 
a[2] = a[4]  1 3 5 4 5 6 7 8
a[4] = t     1 3 5 4 2 6 7 8
   t = a[3]  4
a[3] = a[6]  1 3 5 7 2 6 7 8
a[6] = a[5]  1 3 5 7 2 6 6 8
a[5] = t     1 3 5 7 2 4 6 8

for 12 elements, it's just one cycle of 10 elements

               0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11  
         I[] = 0  2  4  6  8 10  1  3  5  7  9 11

    t = a[ 1]  2
a[ 1] = a[ 2]  1  3  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12
a[ 2] = a[ 4]  1  3  5  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12
a[ 4] = a[ 8]  1  3  5  4  9  6  7  8  9 10 11 12
a[ 8] = a[ 5]  1  3  5  4  9  6  7  8  6 10 11 12
a[ 5] = a[10]  1  3  5  4  9 11  7  8  6 10 11 12
a[10] = a[ 9]  1  3  5  4  9 11  7  8  6 10 10 12
a[ 9] = a[ 7]  1  3  5  4  9 11  7  8  6  8 10 12
a[ 7] = a[ 3]  1  3  5  4  9 11  7  4  6  8 10 12
a[ 3] = a[ 6]  1  3  5  7  9 11  7  4  6  8 10 12
a[ 6] = t      1  3  5  7  9 11  2  4  6  8 10 12

For 27 elements, it's 3 cycles, starting at a[1] (19 elements), a[3] (6 elements), and a[9] (2 elements).

  • Even the number of cycles seems to be nontrivial. I've checked numerically and for even array sizes n, the number of cycles (including the trivial cycle for the first element) seems to be represented by this sequence: oeis.org/A081844 (For odd n it's number_of_cycles(n - 1) + 1, because it includes the trivial cycle for the last element) – Kolmar Feb 28 '16 at 18:13
  • If you decompose the needed permutation into cycles, it looks like this: e.g. for n = 35: (0) (1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 29, 23, 11, 22, 9, 18) (3, 6, 12, 24, 13, 26, 17, 34, 33, 31, 27, 19) (5, 10, 20) (7, 14, 28, 21) (15, 30, 25) (35). It's easy to notice that each cycle can be obtained by taking its first element, and multiplying it by 2 modulo n until the first element is seen again. – Kolmar Feb 28 '16 at 22:47
  • @Kolmar - Cycling isn't a problem, and I already posted the formula for that. The problem is after completing a cycle, how do you know which elements were missed? In this case the cycles start at 1, 3, 5, 7, but 9, 11, 13, are already in place by then so the last cycle starts at 15. Maybe there's an alternative to the cycle approach that might take twice or more as long, but still be O(N), and in O(1) space. – rcgldr Feb 29 '16 at 6:49
  • Continuing, - anything based on recursion would seem to take O(N log(N)) time, so that eliminates those type of approaches. I'm wondering if there's some O(n) algorithm that could temporarily place values in the wrong place in an array, then later fix that in O(n) time (doesn't matter if it's a multiple of the time doing the cycle approach). – rcgldr Feb 29 '16 at 6:54
  • There's been no response from the OP if N is known in advance, in which case the cycle pattern would also be known in advance. – rcgldr Feb 29 '16 at 6:56
1

This is a partial answer only.

Here's the executable pseudocode for the first half of the array:

def magic_swap(arr):
    mid = len(arr) / 2 + (1 if len(arr) % 2 == 1 else 0)

    for i in range(1, mid):
        arr[i], arr[i*2] = arr[i*2], arr[i]

The second half is the tricky part... I will update this answer if I ever figure out it.

For people who want to figure this out, here's the results for the first few array sizes:

Note that arrays of size n and n+1, when n is odd, always have the same sequence of swaps in this approach.

[1, 2]
[1, 3, 2]
[1, 3, 2, 4]
[1, 3, 5, 4, 2]
[1, 3, 5, 4, 2, 6]
[1, 3, 5, 7, 2, 6, 4]
[1, 3, 5, 7, 2, 6, 4, 8]
[1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 6, 4, 8, 2]
[1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 6, 4, 8, 2, 10]
[1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 4, 8, 2, 10, 6]
[1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 4, 8, 2, 10, 6, 12]
[1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 8, 2, 10, 6, 12, 4]
[1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 8, 2, 10, 6, 12, 4, 14]
[1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 2, 10, 6, 12, 4, 14, 8]
[1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 2, 10, 6, 12, 4, 14, 8, 16]
[1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 10, 6, 12, 4, 14, 8, 16, 2]
[1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 10, 6, 12, 4, 14, 8, 16, 2, 18]
[1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19, 6, 12, 4, 14, 8, 16, 2, 18, 10]
[1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19, 6, 12, 4, 14, 8, 16, 2, 18, 10, 20]
1

The problem seems rather hard with O(1) and O(n) restrictions.

Best match I can find is an article Stable minimum space partitioning in linear time, where they propose a solution for slightly more general problem. However, their algorithm is complex and (IMHO) not applicable in practice.

Unless it is a theoretical question, I suggest to relax restrictions to O(logN) and O(NlogN) respectively, and use simple 'stable partitioning' algorithm (updated):

#inplace reverse block [begin,end) in list l
#O(|end-begin|)
def reverse(l, begin, end):
    p = begin
    q = end - 1
    while p < q:
        l[p], l[q] = l[q], l[p]
        p = p + 1
        q = q - 1

#inplace swaps blocks [begin, mid) and [mid, end) and
#returns a new pivot (dividing point)
#O(|end-begin|)
def swap(l, begin, mid, end):
    reverse(l, begin, mid)
    reverse(l, mid, end)
    reverse(l, begin, end)
    return (end - (mid - begin))

#recursive partitioning: partition block [begin, end) into
#even and odd blocks, returns pivot (dividing point)
##O(|end-begin|*log|end-begin|)
def partition(l, begin, end):
    if end - begin > 1:
        mid = (begin + end) / 2
        p = partition(l, begin, mid)
        q = partition(l, mid, end)
        mid = swap(l, p, mid, q)
        return mid
    return begin if l[begin] % 2 == 0 else begin + 1

def sort(l):
    partition(l, 0, len(l))
    return l

print sort([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8])

Update. For an updated question, article is a direct match. So unless there is some trick which abuses the numerical nature of elements, we don't have a simple solution to that problem.

-1

Here is a python program that works. No extra space needed, only one pass through the array.
You don't require the numbers to be sorted or to keep the original order; just put them together.

arr = [1,3,2,4,5,6,3,55,66,77,21,4,5]
iFirst = 0
iLast  = len(arr)-1
print arr
while (iFirst < iLast):
    while ((arr[iFirst] & 1)==1):  # find next even at the front
        iFirst += 1
    while ((arr[iLast] & 1)==0):   # find next odd at the back
        iLast -= 1
    k = arr[iLast]                 # exchange them
    arr[iLast] = arr[iFirst]
    arr[iFirst] = k
    iFirst += 1
    iLast -= 1
print arr  

Here is the output.

[1, 3, 2, 4, 5, 6, 3, 55, 66, 77, 21, 4, 5]
[1, 3, 5, 21, 5, 77, 3, 66, 55, 6, 4, 4, 2]
  • See Tim's comment: "I don't think the actual values matter, as OP is referring to "even and odd places"." – Claudiu Feb 23 '16 at 3:51
  • Oh turns out this is what OP had wanted the whole time .. although he did want order preserved, but I think you can do it if you start from the same side somehow. – Claudiu Feb 24 '16 at 19:57
  • Yes, this is good but the order is not preserved. – NPK Feb 24 '16 at 20:03

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