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I have several large objects (sklearn models) that take up a lot of memory, and I want to share them between several process. is there a way to do this?

  • It has to be the "live" object, and not a serialized version
  • I know that there's a memory mapped version of numpy array, which are responsible for a significant part of the model memory - but using them will require significant changes to the sklearn source code, which would be hard to maintain
  • 1
    Could you give a concrete example? Which model attributes are taking up lots of memory? – ali_m Feb 23 '16 at 21:24
  • It depends. One major issue is the vocabulary in text vectorizing models. – Ophir Yoktan Feb 23 '16 at 21:40
  • Are you using sparse matrices? – ali_m Feb 23 '16 at 21:49
  • 1
    I don't know... it's hard to make any specific suggestions without a concrete test case in mind (you still haven't even mentioned what sort of model you're referring to). If you provided an MCVE then you'd have a much better chance at getting a useful answer. – ali_m Feb 23 '16 at 22:00
  • 1
    Do you still need an answer for this question? If so, please tell me whether you mean to share the objects (a) across processes running at different times, or (b) running simultaneously on the same computer. Please choose a or b. – DrM Aug 24 '18 at 16:32
2

Under the proviso that the processes are launched from the same python script, here is an example that creates a second process and shares variables between the two processes. It is straightforward to elaborate on this to create some number of processes. Notice the constructs used to create and access the shared variables and lock. I have inserted a loop over an arithmetic process to generate some cpu usage so that you can monitor and see how this runs on a multi-core or multi-processor platform. Also note the use of a shared variable to control the second process, in this instance to tell it when to exit. And finally, the shared object can be a value or an array, see https://docs.python.org/2/library/multiprocessing.html

#!/usr/bin/python

from time import sleep
from multiprocessing import Process, Value, Lock

def myfunc(counter, lock, run):

    while run.value:
        sleep(1)
        n=0
        for i in range(10000):
            n = n+i*i
        print( n )
        with lock:
            counter.value += 1
            print( "thread %d"%counter.value )

    with lock:
        counter.value = -1
        print( "thread exit %d"%counter.value )

# =======================

counter = Value('i', 0)
run = Value('b', True)
lock = Lock()

p = Process(target=myfunc, args=(counter, lock, run))
p.start()

while counter.value < 5:
    print( "main %d"%counter.value )
    n=0
    for i in range(10000):
        n = n+i*i
    print( n )
    sleep(1)

with lock:
    counter.value = 0

while counter.value < 5:
    print( "main %d"%counter.value )
    sleep(1)

run.value = False

p.join()

print( "main exit %d"%counter.value)
  • TL;DR - this doesn't use memory mapped files, but shared memory based on forking from a predefined process. While this may somewhat less optimal (forked python memory is copied sometimes - for example because of changing reference counts), it's probably the best 'non intrusive' solution – Ophir Yoktan Aug 26 '18 at 12:40
  • Thank you. That's what I was going for. Hope it helps. B'hatzlocha – DrM Aug 26 '18 at 12:46

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