44

In Python, what is the difference between using the same decorator with and without parentheses?

For example:

Without parentheses:

@some_decorator
def some_method():
    pass

With parentheses:

@some_decorator()
def some_method():
    pass
  • 5
    These are not braces, but parentheses. Braces are {}. – Daniel Roseman Feb 23 '16 at 8:52
  • @DanielRoseman good hint, often struggeling with finding the correct words... – BendEg Feb 23 '16 at 9:11
  • 2
    Great answer below. It's worth pointing out the difference is the same as the difference between foo and foo() anywhere, including not in a decorator. – Mike Graham Feb 23 '16 at 9:36
51

some_decorator in the first code snippet is a regular decorator:

@some_decorator
def some_method():
    pass

is equivalent to

some_method = some_decorator(some_method)

On the other hand, some_decorator in the second code snippet is a callable that returns a decorator:

@some_decorator()
def some_method():
    pass

is equivalent to

some_method = some_decorator()(some_method)

As pointed out by Duncan in comments, some decorators are designed to work both ways. Here's a pretty basic implementation of such decorator:

def some_decorator(arg=None):
    def decorator(func):
        def wrapper(*a, **ka):
            return func(*a, **ka)
        return wrapper

    if callable(arg):
        return decorator(arg) # return 'wrapper'
    else:
        return decorator # ... or 'decorator'

pytest.fixture is a more complex example.

  • 10
    It might be worth adding to your answer to mention that some decorators are written to work both ways, e.g. @pytest.fixture can be used directly as a decorator, or called perhaps with some named arguments in which case it returns a decorator. – Duncan Feb 23 '16 at 9:08
  • What is the point of callable decorators? AFAICT, someDecorator() will always return the same thing, since it does not take any arguments (unless someDecorator holds a state). So I presume that callable decorators hold a state? – Utku Dec 27 '16 at 18:48
  • Also note that the trick mentioned by Duncan can now be entirely automated, thanks to decopatch. I'm the author by the way :) – smarie Mar 11 at 16:09
1

Some actually working code where you use the arg inside decorator:

def someDecorator(arg=None):
    def decorator(func):
        def wrapper(*a, **ka):
            if not callable(arg):
                print (arg)
                return func(*a, **ka)
            else:
                return 'xxxxx'
        return wrapper

    if callable(arg):
        return decorator(arg) # return 'wrapper'
    else:
        return decorator # ... or 'decorator'

@someDecorator(arg=1)
def my_func():
    print('aaa')

@someDecorator
def my_func1():
    print('bbb')

if __name__ == "__main__":
    my_func()
    my_func1()

The output is:

1
aaa
  • This is a very nice technique, but it does not really answer the original question, which ask what the difference is between using parentheses or not. – florisla Aug 6 at 12:01
0

Briefly speaking, decorators allow adding rich features to groups of functions and classes without modifying them at all.

The key to understand the difference between @some_decorator and @some_decorator() is that the former is decorator, while the latter is a function (or callable) that returns a decorator.

I believe that seeing an implementation of each case facilitates understanding the difference:

@some_decorator

def some_decorator(func):
    def wrapper(func):
        return func(*args, **kwargs)
    return wrapper

Application:

@some_decorator
def some_method():
    pass

Equivalence:

some_method = some_decorator(some_method)

@some_decorator()

def some_decorator():
    def decorator(func):
        def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
            return func(*args, **kwargs)
        return wrapper
    return decorator

Application:

@some_decorator()
def some_method():
    pass

Equivalence:

some_method = some_decorator()(some_method)

Notice that now it is easier to see that @some_decorator() is a function returning a decorator while some_decorator is just a decorator. Keep in mind that some decorators are written to work both ways.

So now you might be wondering why we have these two cases when the former version seems simpler. The answer is that if you want to pass arguments to a decorator, using @some_decorator() will allow you to do this. Let's see some code in action:

def some_decorator(arg1, arg2):
    def decorator(func):
        def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
            print(arg1)
            print(arg2)
            return func(*args, **kwargs)
        return wrapper
    return decorator

Application:

@some_decorator('hello', 'bye')
def some_method():
    pass

Equivalence:

some_method = some_decorator('hello', 'bye')(some_method)

Note: I think that it is worth to mention that a decorator can be implemented as a function or as a class. Check this for more information.

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