14

I'm trying to use STANDARD_HASH Oracle (12c) function in PL/SQL but seems not available:

SQL> exec   dbms_output.put_line(STANDARD_HASH('test'));
BEGIN dbms_output.put_line(STANDARD_HASH('test')); END;

                           *
ERROR at line 1:
ORA-06550: line 1, column 28:
PLS-00201: identifier 'STANDARD_HASH' must be declared
ORA-06550: line 1, column 7:
PL/SQL: Statement ignored

From sql is working just fine:

SQL> select STANDARD_HASH('test') from dual;

STANDARD_HASH('TEST')
----------------------------------------
A94A8FE5CCB19BA61C4C0873D391E987982FBBD3

Why? What is the best way to implement the STANDARD_HASH in PLSQL?

Regards

2
  • 1
    Not all SQL functions are available in PL/SQL; it isn't on this list but perhaps should be. Might fall into the same category as LNNVL.
    – Alex Poole
    Commented Feb 23, 2016 at 10:32
  • That is the more correct answer than usage of custom wrapper function which is re-invention of the wheel. Definitely this variant must be marked as a correct answer. Commented Jun 23, 2017 at 14:29

3 Answers 3

20

Seems like it isn't yet a part of PL/SQL in 12c.

As a workaround, use SELECT INTO in PL/SQL:

SQL> set serveroutput on
SQL> DECLARE
  2    str VARCHAR2(40);
  3  BEGIN
  4    SELECT STANDARD_HASH('test') INTO str FROM dual;
  5    dbms_output.put_line(str);
  6  END;
  7  /
A94A8FE5CCB19BA61C4C0873D391E987982FBBD3

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

SQL>

I would suggest to create a function, and use it whenever you need it in PL/SQL.

For example,

SQL> CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION STANDARD_HASH_OUTPUT(str IN VARCHAR2)
  2    RETURN VARCHAR2
  3  AS
  4    op VARCHAR2(40);
  5  BEGIN
  6    SELECT STANDARD_HASH(str) INTO op FROM dual;
  7    RETURN op;
  8  END;
  9  /

Function created.

Call the function directly in PL/SQL block:

SQL> BEGIN
  2     dbms_output.put_line(STANDARD_HASH_OUTPUT('test'));
  3  END;
  4  /
A94A8FE5CCB19BA61C4C0873D391E987982FBBD3

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

SQL>
2
  • 1
    Thanks Lalit! Seems like I will implement this method as the dbms_crypto.hash function seems to be much slower (avg.43%). I prefer to avoid select from dual (personal opinion) but in this case I will go with this solution.
    – StefanG
    Commented Feb 24, 2016 at 13:14
  • In 19c still the same Commented Nov 3, 2021 at 10:35
3

For text, STANDARD_HASH is the same as DBMS_CRYPTO.HASH with SHA1:

begin
  dbms_output.put_line(dbms_crypto.hash(cast('test' as clob), dbms_crypto.hash_sh1));
end;
/

Output:

A94A8FE5CCB19BA61C4C0873D391E987982FBBD3

For other data types, it's not documented how they are passed to the hash function.

2
  • Thanks Codo! For some reason this method is slower (because of the cast to clob?) than a select from dual using the STANDARD_HASH function. I'm surprised!
    – StefanG
    Commented Feb 24, 2016 at 13:19
  • That's interesting indeed. I would have expected the SELECT to be slower as it involves a context switch. But it's always better to measure than to assume. Thanks for the update.
    – Codo
    Commented Feb 24, 2016 at 13:37
-2

standard hash allows you to specify hash algorithm. Algorithms are SHA1, SHA256, SHA384, SHA512, and MD5. If you omit this argument, then SHA1 is used.

To get a more familiar GUID than sys_guid provides:

LOWER (CAST (standard_hash (SYS_GUID (), 'MD5') AS VARCHAR2 (40)))

I've tested on 20.5 million records with no collisions...

1
  • Another benefit is that this method uses all built-in functions and can be used for a column DEFAULT. Since you can't use user defined functions, procedures and packages in DEFAULT values I was looking for a way to stick with buit-in functions to morph the SYS_GUID into a more visually distinguishable format . Commented Aug 30, 2020 at 22:21

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.