6

I need to use a simple function: mysqli_num_rows(), but I wanted more general knowledge answer.

Are there any differences between calling this function through object oriented style $mysqli_result->num_rows; or procedural style mysqli_num_rows( mysqli_result $result );?

I understand that the OO, as explained here, is accessing a variable, and the procedural call works as a function, but both return the same thing.

The code in my company is procedural and we are slowly migrating to OOP, but it's mostly chaos, so there aren't any internal guidelines that I could (or would like to) follow.

4
  • Are you thinking about a specific type of difference? Performance, user-friendliness, etc.?
    – A.L
    Feb 23, 2016 at 12:32
  • I wanted to know a bit of both. Internal differences in the way they process information (performance, etc.) and best practices (if there is any) to write code that is both useful and nice to other programmers. Feb 23, 2016 at 12:35
  • The given example (accessing an attribute from an object) is rather simple to denote a difference between Object Oriented Programming and a Procedural Approach. Basically, OOP can give better results when you have "hierarchy" between types of informations, or even when you intend to perform tasks on different system with similar operations.
    – Bonatti
    Feb 23, 2016 at 12:38
  • Questions about best practices are not welcomed on this website and are almost always closed. So I suggest you to not ask about best practices. Furthermore, OOP is not specific to the MySQL functions, I think you should focus on the mysqli_num_rows() use, not if it's easier or nicer with OOP.
    – A.L
    Feb 23, 2016 at 12:38

3 Answers 3

6

No, there is no difference. The procedural way is pretty much just a wrapper around the OO API. Historically it was included to allow developers for whom OO was a complete mystery to transition to a better alternative from the mysql API.

For all intents and purposes mysqli_num_rows does this:

function mysqli_num_rows(mysqli_result $result) {
    return $result->num_rows;
}
1

The main difference is only about your preferred style.

In most cases (probably all), the function is a “shortcut” to the oo way.

This two call are equivalents:

$mysqli = new mysqli('localhost', 'my_user', 'my_password', 'my_db');
$mysqli = mysqli_connect('localhost', 'my_user', 'my_password', 'my_db');

because — substantially — the definition of mysqli_connect is this:

function mysqli_connect( $host, $user, $pass, $db )
{
    $conn = new mysqli( $host, $user, $pass, $db );
    return $conn;
}

Edit: the longhand

See — as example — the 3rd part class simple_html_dom. The object oriented way to load a file is:

$dom = new simple_html_dom();
$data = file_get_contents( $url ) or die( 'Error retrieving URL' );
$dom->load( $contents ) or die( 'Error loading HTML' );

The above three line can be condensed with the procedural call:

$dom = file_get_html( $url ) or die( 'Error loading HTML' );

because the internal code of file_get_html is the following (simplified by me):

function file_get_html( $url )
{
    $dom = new simple_html_dom();
    $contents = file_get_contents( $url );
    if( empty($contents) || strlen($contents) > MAX_FILE_SIZE )
    {
        return false;
    }
    $dom->load( $contents );
    return $dom;
}
8
  • I'd argue that the function is often the longhand version of the OO equivalent. $result->num_rows vs. mysqli_num_rows($result)... :)
    – deceze
    Feb 23, 2016 at 12:48
  • Usually Au contrair : the object oriented is the longhand version of procedural style. The OO is the core, and the function is a shortcut. I will edit answer in minutes with an example.
    – fusion3k
    Feb 23, 2016 at 12:52
  • How do you define "shortcut" if not for "it's fewer characters", which I don't think holds up in most cases...? :)
    – deceze
    Feb 23, 2016 at 12:53
  • @deceze Edited. Maybe I don't understand, I'm not english. I intend: shortcut = few words, longhand = ordinary handwriting (as opposed to shorthand). So, if function is shortcut of oo, oo is longhand of function.
    – fusion3k
    Feb 23, 2016 at 13:09
  • Not really comparable. file_get_html implements a much more complex operation in a, indeed, shorthand way. This does not hold up for mysqli, in which the procedural and OO way do exactly the same things, and often the OO way is shorter.
    – deceze
    Feb 23, 2016 at 13:11
0

The difference is one is a function, the other is a method. Use whichever you fancy.

But, if your company is slowly migrating to an OO approach, it would be best to stick to using objects. For one, doing so will allow you to take full advantage of dependency injection.

index.php

<?php

    $mysqli = new mysqli('localhost', 'my_user', 'my_password', 'my_db');

    /*
     * Dependency Injection
     */
    $userService = new UserService($db);
    $users = $userService->getUsers();

UserService.php

<?php

class UserService
{
    private $db;

    public function __construct($db)
    {
        $this->db = $db;
    }

    public function getUsers()
    {
        if ($result = $this->db->query("SELECT username, city FROM users"))
            return $result->num_rows;
        else
            return false;
    }
}

This allows you to reuse objects. You're being DRY (Don't Repeat Yourself).

There's no disadvantage to using a mysqli or PDO object even in procedural code. You get the benefit of cleaner code.

4
  • This doesn't really impact dependency injection at all, since you're still required to pass the mysqli object around. It's literally just a difference in the call syntax, no more, no less.
    – deceze
    Feb 23, 2016 at 12:44
  • The mysqli object IS the dependency. UserServices depends on it. Passing the dependency into the constructor (could do the same with a setter), is dependency injection. If his company is moving towards OOP, it would benefit him greatly to use the object version. Sure, you could pass the mysqli_connect , but what's the purpose of using OOP when you're sticking to prodedural method calls? Feb 23, 2016 at 12:48
  • I don't get you. Whether you create $mysqli with new mysqli() or mysqli_connect() makes absolutely no difference; the result is $mysqli, an object (it's an object in both cases) which you pass around.
    – deceze
    Feb 23, 2016 at 12:50
  • I wasn't aware of that. I've used PDO for the past 7 or odd years, never touched mysqli_connect. I see what you mean now. But still, the answer states the same, the style is down to the user. I was merely showing an example of why it would benefit him. Usually, I show this to those switching from procedural, and I often teach PDO. I've checked the docs, and I see both do actually return an object. Feb 23, 2016 at 12:52

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