1

A simplified version of my dataset:

I have a table with 2 columns col1 and col2

I want to optimize this query:

SELECT * FROM mytable a
LEFT JOIN mytable b
ON a.col1 = b.col2

What is the best index to create on this table?

  • Two indices: index on col1 and another on col2
  • One double index: index on both col1,col2

Let's complicate it a bit: (my real-life data structure)

Say I also have a column extract_date in my table:

SELECT * FROM mytable a
LEFT JOIN mytable b
ON a.col1 = b.col2 AND a.extract_date=b.extract_date

What is the best index to create on this table?

  • Two double indices: index1 on col1,extract_date and another on col2,extract_date
  • One triple index: index on col1,col2,extract_date
5
  • basic rule of thumb: any field used in a "decision context": a where clause, an order by, a group by, etc... should be indexed. how you could go about building those indexes up to you.
    – Marc B
    Commented Feb 23, 2016 at 20:39
  • I don't agree... i've seen there are guidelines depending on the granularity of the dataset, and if MySQL decides to use it or not
    – BassMHL
    Commented Feb 23, 2016 at 20:41
  • well, yeah, if it's a 10 record table, index would be overkill.
    – Marc B
    Commented Feb 23, 2016 at 20:51
  • i'm talking about millions of rows. And by granularity, I mean distinct values of each column: col1 has 10 distinct values, col2 has 1000 distinct values
    – BassMHL
    Commented Feb 23, 2016 at 20:56
  • then indexes will still help in most cases. there's no hard/fast rule that says "indexes of type X and quantity Y will cause Z% performance increase". you'll have to test it both ways. if your particular data set proves out that indexes don't help, then don't waste the overhead of creating/maintaining that index.
    – Marc B
    Commented Feb 23, 2016 at 20:57

3 Answers 3

3

What is the best index to create on this table?

  • Two indices: index on col1 and another on col2
  • One double index: index on both col1,col2

A two-column index does not optimize your query the way two one-column indexes would do.

From MySQL manual, bold emphasis mine:

MySQL can use multiple-column indexes for queries that test all the columns in the index, or queries that test just the first column, the first two columns, the first three columns, and so on. If you specify the columns in the right order in the index definition, a single composite index can speed up several kinds of queries on the same table.

From what you can read above multiple-column indexes can be used by MySQL engine when there are constraints on the leading (leftmost) columns.

So your particular query wouldn't benefit from index on col1,col2 as much as two separate indices, since this index would not be used for lookup considering = b.col2 part of your JOIN clause.

SELECT * FROM mytable a
LEFT JOIN mytable b
ON a.col1 = b.col2

As for your "real" data structure, the above still applies.

Note: A rule of thumb is to index for equality first, and then for ranges. Markus Winand backs me up in his book that treats about indexes.

2

For a.col1 = b.col2, col1 and col2 are in separate tables. (Never mind that it is a self-join; that is irrelevant for creating an index.)

For the more complex query, again, consider each table separately. These are optimal:

INDEX(col1, extract_date) -- in either order, and
INDEX(col2, extract_date) -- also in either order.

I agree with Marcus and Consider; see my Index Cookbook. And you get only one crack at 'ranges'.

0

You should have two indexes. All the columns in a composite index can only be used when the WHERE clause is of the form

WHERE a.col1 = something AND a.col2 = somethingelse AND a.col3 = thirdthing ...

A condition like a.col1 = b.col2 doesn't match that pattern, because a and b are different instances of the table.

2
  • I think the real point is that col1 and col2 are in 'different' tables.
    – Rick James
    Commented Feb 24, 2016 at 2:07
  • @RickJames Right, I wasn't sure how to express it when I wrote my answer. I've clarified by adding aliases to the example.
    – Barmar
    Commented Feb 24, 2016 at 5:42

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