23

I had a javascript array that was rendering components using array.map. I switched this array to an es6 Map in order to be able to use key-value pairs to find items more easily, and switched from a .map to a forEach over the Map. Inside the forEach I call a render method that returns a React component, but it isn't being rendered. How do I render a component inside the forEach?

<div className='gallery__items'>
    {resultsByGuid.forEach((result, index) => {
        key++;
        this.renderGalleryItem(result, key);
    })} 
</div>

Here is the renderGalleryItem method:

renderGalleryItem = (item, index) => {
    const { gridItemSelected, itemThumbnailRequested } = this.props;
    return (
        <GalleryItem
            key={index}
            item={item}
            onClick={gridItemSelected}
            fetchThumbnailFunc={itemThumbnailRequested}
        />
    );
};

I understand that forEach doesn't return anything but does that mean I can't render inside it?

4
  • How about you store/append that html string in a variable that you inject after the forEach?
    – LukeS
    Feb 23, 2016 at 23:53
  • 1
    Use the Map.prototype.values() method.
    – zerkms
    Feb 23, 2016 at 23:57
  • So, JSX expects an array? Then use Array.from(resultsByGuid) and go with .map from there.
    – Bergi
    Feb 24, 2016 at 0:07
  • @John please don't remove the [javascript] tag from JavaScript questions just because they're primarily about a framework or library rather than the language itself. Using the language tag is still totally valid (and useful to people following the tag) even in such cases. Adding framework tags where they're absent is a good change, but removing [javascript] is not.
    – Mark Amery
    Jan 31, 2021 at 11:40

4 Answers 4

20

Just a slight improvement on danday74's example using array destructuring. With options the ES6 Map:

<select>
    {[...options].map(([key, value]) => (
        <option key={key} value={key}>
            {value}
        </option>
    ))}
</select>;
1
  • 1
    This works for me in devtools, but when I try this in my JSX, I'm getting "Uncaught TypeError: options.concat is not a function", but {Array.from(options.entries()).map(([k, v]) => ([k, v])} from @Rob M. works for me... probably some babel-plugin missing, eh...
    – ptim
    Aug 28, 2019 at 16:13
17

You are correct, forEach doesn't return anything, use map instead, it will return an array of JSX components.

Map will allow you to access the key as well: resultsByGuid.map((item, key) => { })

Edit I apologize for jumping the gun and not reading that you were using a Map data structure. forEach won't render anything because you need the return value, you could implement your own Array.map like iterator:

const mapIterator = (map, cb) => {
  const agg = [];
  for(let [key, value] of map) {
    agg.push(cb(value, key));
  }
  return agg;
};

<div className='gallery__items'>
  {mapIterator(resultsByGuid, (result, index) => {
    key++;
    return this.renderGalleryItem(result, key);
  })}
</div>

Edit 2 And thanks to @zerkms for pointing out what should've been obvious to me:

<div className='gallery__items'>
  {Array.from(resultsByGuid.values()).map((result, index) => {
    key++;
    return this.renderGalleryItem(result, key);
  })}
</div>
8
  • 2
    But it does have an entries() method, which you should be able to use in the context of for loop... If not, you can always call the keys() method on the map... Feb 23, 2016 at 23:59
  • 1
    It does have indeed. The .values() would be even better.
    – zerkms
    Feb 24, 2016 at 0:00
  • 2
    Array.from(resultsByGuid.values()).map(...) or [...resultsByGuid.values()].map(...)
    – zerkms
    Feb 24, 2016 at 0:13
  • 6
    What am I missing? It seems ridiculously inefficient to have to restructure a Map as an Array every time you want to do any kind of map/reduce/filter function on it. Is the spec not finished? Is there any easy way to write an inline iterator function?
    – Andy H.
    Mar 10, 2017 at 18:07
  • 2
    Also, this undermines the usage of a Map over Array to preserve order...
    – MDjava
    Mar 7, 2021 at 6:15
8

another option, where options is an es6 Map() ..

<select>
  {
    [...options].map((entry) => {
      let key = entry[0]
      let value = entry[1]
      return <option key={ key } value={ key }>{ value }</option>
    })
  }
</select>
1
  • 1
    Thank you! This helped me tremendously. Apr 9, 2020 at 18:04
0

If you call .entries() on your map you will get an iterator object which for every key/value pair contains an array with the structure: [key, value] as mentioned here.

So you could just do:

<div className='gallery__items'>
  {resultsByGuid.entries().map((result) => {
    return this.renderGalleryItem(result[1], result[0]);
  })}
</div>

I am still wondering, if there's a simpler solution though.

2
  • 7
    .entries() returns an iterator, not an array!
    – hyperknot
    Sep 25, 2018 at 8:30
  • Thanks @hyperknot! I corrected my answer accordingly. Oct 16, 2018 at 13:03

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