28

Is there a quick and nice way using linq?

3
  • @AakashM, Its almost sure that by lambda expressions OP meant linq, and not some delegate/expression approach. No idea why the edit was reverted.
    – nawfal
    May 30 '13 at 8:55
  • @nawfal 1) there's no way to suspect what this unregistered user meant 4+years ago, even less to be 'almost sure'. 2) find-occurrences is a poor and in any case inappropriate tag. 3) The word "linq" isn't code and so shouldn't be formatted as code. Three at-best-questionable parts to an edit to my mind make perfectly good grounds for reversion, but feel free to take it to meta if you disagree.
    – AakashM
    May 30 '13 at 9:09
  • @AakashM I agree with 3. Nevertheless the gist of my edit was a more sensible question. You could have removed the inappropriate (?) tag, and also the code formatting if that is what mattered by reediting rather than reverting. So now, in any case inappropriate tag, so for what type of questions is it more suitable?. 2) what do you think OP must have meant by lambda expressions? My point is there is a way to suspect having been in C# circle for a while, and its a strong suspicion given the answer OP has chosen.
    – nawfal
    May 30 '13 at 9:24
81

How about:

var most = list.GroupBy(i=>i).OrderByDescending(grp=>grp.Count())
      .Select(grp=>grp.Key).First();

or in query syntax:

var most = (from i in list
            group i by i into grp
            orderby grp.Count() descending
            select grp.Key).First();

Of course, if you will use this repeatedly, you could add an extension method:

public static T MostCommon<T>(this IEnumerable<T> list)
{
    return ... // previous code
}

Then you can use:

var most = list.MostCommon();
4
  • Thats what I was trying to get at, but my brain just ain't working at the moment.
    – Nathan W
    Dec 10 '08 at 13:26
  • 6
    What if more than one element is the answer? Dec 10 '08 at 13:34
  • 2
    Best solution with native LINQ. Although with MoreLINQ's MaxBy() you could even do the following: list.GroupBy(i=>i).MaxBy(g=>g.Count()).Key. Aside from being shorter and clearer, it should theoretically be more efficient for large data sets (max vs. sort). May 31 '13 at 10:03
  • Thanks Marc. It enabled me to apply most frequent kmers problem without any fuss. May 16 '16 at 5:45
5

Not sure about the lambda expressions, but I would

  1. Sort the list [O(n log n)]

  2. Scan the list [O(n)] finding the longest run-length.

  3. Scan it again [O(n)] reporting each number having that run-length.

This is because there could be more than one most-occurring number.

3

Taken from my answer here:

public static IEnumerable<T> Mode<T>(this IEnumerable<T> input)
{            
    var dict = input.ToLookup(x => x);
    if (dict.Count == 0)
        return Enumerable.Empty<T>();
    var maxCount = dict.Max(x => x.Count());
    return dict.Where(x => x.Count() == maxCount).Select(x => x.Key);
}

var modes = { }.Mode().ToArray(); //returns { }
var modes = { 1, 2, 3 }.Mode().ToArray(); //returns { 1, 2, 3 }
var modes = { 1, 1, 2, 3 }.Mode().ToArray(); //returns { 1 }
var modes = { 1, 2, 3, 1, 2 }.Mode().ToArray(); //returns { 1, 2 }

I went for a performance test between the above approach and David B's TakeWhile.

source = { }, iterations = 1000000
mine - 300 ms, David's - 930 ms

source = { 1 }, iterations = 1000000
mine - 1070 ms, David's - 1560 ms

source = 100+ ints with 2 duplicates, iterations = 10000
mine - 300 ms, David's - 500 ms

source = 10000 random ints with about 100+ duplicates, iterations = 1000
mine - 1280 ms, David's - 1400 ms

1

Here is another answer, which seems to be fast. I think Nawfal's answer is generally faster but this might shade it on long sequences.

public static IEnumerable<T> Mode<T>(
    this IEnumerable<T> source,
    IEqualityComparer<T> comparer = null)
{
    var counts = source.GroupBy(t => t, comparer)
        .Select(g => new { g.Key, Count = g.Count() })
        .ToList();

    if (counts.Count == 0)
    {
        return Enumerable.Empty<T>();
    }

    var maxes = new List<int>(5);
    int maxCount = 1;

    for (var i = 0; i < counts.Count; i++)
    {
        if (counts[i].Count < maxCount)
        {
            continue;
        }

        if (counts[i].Count > maxCount)
        {
            maxes.Clear();
            maxCount = counts[i].Count;
        }

        maxes.Add(i);
    }

    return maxes.Select(i => counts[i].Key);
}
0
0

Someone asked for a solution where there's ties. Here's a stab at that:

int indicator = 0

var result =
  list.GroupBy(i => i)
    .Select(g => new {i = g.Key, count = g.Count()}
    .OrderByDescending(x => x.count)
    .TakeWhile(x =>
    {
      if (x.count == indicator || indicator == 0)
      {
        indicator = x.count;
        return true;
      }
      return false;
    })
    .Select(x => x.i);

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