19

The following code calls the builtin functions for clz/ctz in GCC and, on other systems, has C versions. Obviously, the C versions are a bit suboptimal if the system has a builtin clz/ctz instruction, like x86 and ARM.

#ifdef __GNUC__
#define clz(x) __builtin_clz(x)
#define ctz(x) __builtin_ctz(x)
#else
static uint32_t ALWAYS_INLINE popcnt( uint32_t x )
{
    x -= ((x >> 1) & 0x55555555);
    x = (((x >> 2) & 0x33333333) + (x & 0x33333333));
    x = (((x >> 4) + x) & 0x0f0f0f0f);
    x += (x >> 8);
    x += (x >> 16);
    return x & 0x0000003f;
}
static uint32_t ALWAYS_INLINE clz( uint32_t x )
{
    x |= (x >> 1);
    x |= (x >> 2);
    x |= (x >> 4);
    x |= (x >> 8);
    x |= (x >> 16);
    return 32 - popcnt(x);
}
static uint32_t ALWAYS_INLINE ctz( uint32_t x )
{
    return popcnt((x & -x) - 1);
}

#endif

What functions do I need to call, which headers do I need to include, etc to add a proper ifdef for MSVC here? I've already looked at this page, but I'm not entirely sure what the #pragma is for (is it required?) and what restrictions it puts on MSVC version requirements for compilation. As someone who doesn't really use MSVC, I also don't know whether these intrinsics have C equivalents on other architectures, or whether I have to #ifdef x86/x86_64 as well when #defining them.

3
  • The page you refer to above refers to a function that is part of the .NET runtime, are you trying to build your program for .NET or as a native Windows executable? Dec 10 '08 at 13:49
  • 1
    It's a native Windows executable--part of the reason I'm asking is that I've found it rather difficult to find Microsoft documentation pages that actually talk about C these days. Dec 10 '08 at 18:04
  • Libcxx implementation github.com/llvm-mirror/libcxx/blob/…
    – KindDragon
    Apr 3 '17 at 10:35
25

Bouncing from sh0dan code, the implementation should be corrected like this :

#ifdef _MSC_VER
#include <intrin.h>

uint32_t __inline ctz( uint32_t value )
{
    DWORD trailing_zero = 0;

    if ( _BitScanForward( &trailing_zero, value ) )
    {
        return trailing_zero;
    }
    else
    {
        // This is undefined, I better choose 32 than 0
        return 32;
    }
}

uint32_t __inline clz( uint32_t value )
{
    DWORD leading_zero = 0;

    if ( _BitScanReverse( &leading_zero, value ) )
    {
       return 31 - leading_zero;
    }
    else
    {
         // Same remarks as above
         return 32;
    }
}
#endif

As commented in the code, both ctz and clz are undefined if value is 0. In our abstraction, we fixed __builtin_clz(value) as (value?__builtin_clz(value):32) but it's a choice

5
  • 3
    An almost 1-to-1 replacement for __builtin_clz() in MSVC is __lzcnt(). The hardware must support SSE4 though. More info.
    – rustyx
    Jan 27 '16 at 10:23
  • 1
    My hardware supports SSE4, but not BMI1, so __lzcnt() compiles but doesn't do what I'd expect, rather working as a BSR.
    – GregC
    Mar 14 '17 at 15:36
  • 2
    31 ^__builtin_clz is equal to _BitScanReverse
    – KindDragon
    Feb 16 '18 at 13:16
  • Note that GNU C __builtin_ctz and clz also have undefined behaviour when the input value is 0 (gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Other-Builtins.html); this allows them to inline as a single bsf instruction (or 31 ^ bsr which works for the range of defined outputs). If you need to handle possibly-zero inputs, then you'd want similar wrappers for the GNU C builtins, so the appropriate thing would to have a portability layer around BSF / 31^BSR, and then zero-handling on top of that... And using lzcnt #ifdef __BMI1__. Oct 17 '20 at 10:04
  • Related: VS: unexpected optimization behavior with _BitScanReverse64 intrinsic - the MSVC doesn't expose the destination-unmodified behaviour of the asm instruction, even though it has an API that could do that. (So you don't need to initialize the index output arg; it doesn't hurt though, the compiler knows it's an output-only operand of the intrinsic.) Oct 17 '20 at 10:08
1

If MSVC has a compiler intrinsic for this, it'll be here:

Compiler Intrinsics on MSDN

Otherwise, you'll have to write it using __asm

1

I find it in a korean website https://torbjorn.tistory.com/317 In msvc compiler, you can use __lzcnt(unsigned int) to replace __builtin_clz(unsigned int) in gcc compiler.

1
  • Note that the lzcnt instruction requires BMI1. On older CPUs, it executes as bsr, giving 31-lzcnt (and leaving the destination register unmodified for input=0). GCC will only expand __builtin_clz as lznct if you compile with -march=haswell or similar options. Oct 17 '20 at 9:56
1
  1. The equivalent function for int __builtin_ctz (unsigned int x) in MSVC is unsigned int _tzcnt_u32 (unsigned int a) for 32 bit integer and returns count of trailing zeros. For 64 bit use unsigned __int64 _tzcnt_u64 (unsigned __int64 a) 1.

  2. The equivalent function for int __builtin_clz (unsigned int x) in MSVC is unsigned int _lzcnt_u32 (unsigned int a) for 32 bit integer and returns count of leading zeros. For 64 bit use unsigned __int64 _lzcnt_u64 (unsigned __int64 a) 2

C++ Header: immintrin.h

8
  • 1
    Not all computers have BMI1, so lzcnt may decode as bsr and give 31-clz instead of the clz you're expecting. There is an MSVC intrinsic for bsr, specifically _BitScanReverse. They're only equivalent if you would / could have compiled with gcc -mbmi (or of course gcc -march=haswell or something that includes BMI1). See Does x64 support imply BMI1 support? for old-hardware compat issues (and current-gen Pentium / Celeron low-end CPUs, thanks Intel) with these intrinsics. This is a useful answer, but only with an edit to mention that. May 3 at 16:42
  • All processor may not support BMI1 instruction set. However, based on detection of BMI1 instructions availability, lzcnt can be used. Otherwise bsr can be used.
    – Cipher
    May 3 at 19:35
  • Yes, exactly. You have to check your CPU and manually use clz = 31-bsr(x); to exactly emulate __builtin_clz on CPUs without BMI1. But your answer doesn't say that. It wrongly implies that _lzcnt_u32 will give you identical results to __builtin_clz in general. But unlike GCC, MSVC lets you use intrinsics without needing to compile with any -march=haswell equivalent to "promise" that you'll only run the binary on CPUs that support some instruction-set extensions. May 4 at 4:38
  • (And BTW, to exactly emulate _lzcnt_u32 without BMI1, you'd want lzcnt = x==0 ? 32 : 31-bsr(x);. __builtin_clz has undefined behaviour if run with an input of 0, allowing it to compile to just a bsr(x) ^ 31, but lzcnt has well-defined behaviour for input == 0.) May 4 at 4:40
  • I didn't get the sense of what is "manually use clz = 31-bsr(x)" and why do you want to get leading / trailing zero count for input == 0?
    – Cipher
    May 4 at 7:01
-3

Tested on linux and windows (x86) :

#ifdef WIN32
    #include <intrin.h>
    static uint32_t __inline __builtin_clz(uint32_t x) {
        unsigned long r = 0;
        _BitScanReverse(&r, x);
        return (31-r);
    }
#endif

uint32_t clz64(const uint64_t x)
{
    uint32_t u32 = (x >> 32);
    uint32_t result = u32 ? __builtin_clz(u32) : 32;
    if (result == 32) {
        u32 = x & 0xFFFFFFFFUL;
        result += (u32 ? __builtin_clz(u32) : 32);
    }
    return result;
}
2
  • Have you tested performance of your clz64? I wouldn't be surprised that all this branching makes it slower than the OP's implementation.
    – plamenko
    Sep 24 '16 at 13:13
  • Use __builtin_clzll like a normal person if you want 64-bit integer support on GNU C. Writing it this way will probably stop GCC from using a single 64-bit bsr or lzcnt in 64-bit builds. (But then you'd have a 64-bit MSVC intrinsic available, too.) Oct 17 '20 at 9:59
-4

There are two intrinsics "_BitScanForward" and "_BitScanReverse", which suits the same purpose for MSVC. Include . The functions are:

#ifdef _MSC_VER
#include <intrin.h>

static uint32_t __inline ctz( uint32_t x )
{
   int r = 0;
   _BitScanReverse(&r, x);
   return r;
}

static uint32_t __inline clz( uint32_t x )
{
   int r = 0;
   _BitScanForward(&r, x);
   return r;
}
#endif

There are equivalent 64bit versions "_BitScanForward64" and "_BitScanReverse64".

Read more here:

x86 Intrinsics on MSDN

1
  • 13
    ctz & clz call the wrong functions (they should be using _BitScanForward & BitScanReverse respectively, not BitScanReverse/BitScanForward) & clz is wrong since it returns the offset of the bit set instead of the number of leading zeroes.
    – Vitali
    Dec 16 '11 at 0:54

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