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I am 3 weeks into programming for self-study online python course. The objective is to extend a base BankAccount class where you can withdraw as much as you want by a subclass MinimumBalanceAccount where excessive withdrwals are rejected. Here is what I have so far:

class BankAccount:
    def __init__(self, balance):
        self.balance = balance

    def deposit(self, amount):
        self.balance += amount
        return self.balance

    def withdraw(self, amount):
        if(amount > self.balance):
            print "invalid transaction."
        else:
            self.balance -= amount
            return self.balance   

class MinimumBalanceAccount(BankAccount):
    def __init__(self, minimum_balance):
        BankAccount.__init__(self, self.balance)
        self.minimum_balance = minimum_balance

    def withdraw(self, amount):
        if(self.balance - amount < self.minimum_balance):
            print "Minimum balance exceeded."
        else:
            self.balance -= amount
            return self.balance

Because the online course has online unittesting features, I have written the following unittest from the exercise definition:

import unittest

class AccountBalanceTestCases(unittest.TestCase):
    def setUp(self):
       self.my_account = BankAccount(90)
    # omitting tests that pass ok...
    def test_invalid_operation(self):
       self.assertEqual(self.my_account.withdraw(1000), "invalid transaction", msg='Invalid transaction')

unittest.main(verbosity=2)

The test is expected to pass, but:

$ python bank2.py
test_invalid_operation (__main__.AccountBalanceTestCases) ... invalid transaction.
FAIL

======================================================================
FAIL: test_invalid_operation (__main__.AccountBalanceTestCases)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "bank2.py", line 36, in test_invalid_operation
    self.assertEqual(self.my_account.withdraw(1000), "invalid transaction", msg='Invalid transaction')
AssertionError: Invalid transaction

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 1 test in 0.001s

FAILED (failures=1)
$ 

What am I doing wrong?

closed as off-topic by Karoly Horvath, legoscia, Mark Rotteveel, Rob, David Brossard Feb 24 '16 at 13:57

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions seeking debugging help ("why isn't this code working?") must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers. See: How to create a Minimal, Reproducible Example." – Karoly Horvath, legoscia, Mark Rotteveel, Rob, David Brossard
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 3
    What exactly does not pass? – Daniel Roseman Feb 24 '16 at 12:18
  • Note that one obvious error is that your withdraw method does not return the invalid transaction message, as both the instructions and your test state, it prints it instead. – Daniel Roseman Feb 24 '16 at 12:20
  • It tells me error running your code. – chibole Feb 24 '16 at 12:22
  • No it doesn't. The point of running a unit test is that it gives you messages when assertions fail. So, which assertions failed? What errors did you get? What makes you think the unit test is "wrong"? – Daniel Roseman Feb 24 '16 at 12:22
  • So I'm guessing from this that you are using some kind of online marking tool. That's all very well, but you need to run your code locally first; if you had done so, you would see the specifics of the failing test, as flaschbier shows. – Daniel Roseman Feb 24 '16 at 12:30
4

The unittest returns:

..invalid transaction.
F..
======================================================================
FAIL: test_invalid_operation (__main__.AccountBalanceTestCases)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "bank.py", line 48, in test_invalid_operation
    self.assertEqual(self.my_account.withdraw(1000), "invalid transaction", msg='Invalid transaction')
AssertionError: Invalid transaction

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 5 tests in 0.001s

FAILED (failures=1)
$ 

First remark is big hug for going into unit testing right away. However, a unittest.Testcase should not print anything because this will push garbage in the unittest output.

In this case we read from the exception that self.my_account.withdraw(1000) does not return "invalid transaction". And indeed:

def withdraw(self, amount):
    if(self.balance - amount < self.minimum_balance):
        print "Minimum balance exceeded."
    else:
        self.balance -= amount
        return self.balance

withdraw does not return anything in the exceptional case. So your test code is ok, and it already did serve you well :)

To pass the test, the withdraw method would have to return the string "invalid transaction". Nothing wrong with inheritance here, but when you overwrite a method, you do not inherit from the superclass implementation of that method (unless you call it explicitey).

def withdraw(self, amount):
    if(self.balance - amount < self.minimum_balance):
        print "Minimum balance exceeded."
        return "invalid transaction"
    else:
        self.balance -= amount
        return self.balance

General remark about asking questions: It would have been of great help when code is properly indented and also when we have the exception at hand right away ;)

Update to dive a bit more into the inheritance issue: When you want the MinimumBalanceAccount to be a true BankAccount, you will have to care not only for the minimum_balance but also for the opening balance because this is the part the superclass needs:

class MinimumBalanceAccount(BankAccount):
    def __init__(self, balance, minimum_balance):
        BankAccount.__init__(self, balance)
        self.minimum_balance = minimum_balance
    def withdraw(self, amount):
        ...

I did this test driven, of course:

class MBATest(unittest.TestCase):
  def setUp(self):
    self.my_mba = MinimumBalanceAccount(90, 10)
  def test_mba_withdraw(self):
    # put in one test to be sure about the oder of execution ;)
    self.assertEqual(self.my_mba.withdraw(10), 80)
    self.assertEqual(self.my_mba.withdraw(100), "invalid transaction")

and this one will pass. Because I love verbosity, I use unittest.main(verbosity=2) and end up with:

$ python bank.py
test_balance (__main__.AccountBalanceTestCases) ... ok
test_deposit (__main__.AccountBalanceTestCases) ... ok
test_invalid_operation (__main__.AccountBalanceTestCases) ... ok
test_sub_class (__main__.AccountBalanceTestCases) ... ok
test_withdraw (__main__.AccountBalanceTestCases) ... ok
test_mba_withdraw (__main__.MBATest) ... ok
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 6 tests in 0.000s
OK
$

Maybe you should work thru this question and, if you like it the hard way, also this one...

  • Thank you for your feedback and forgive me for my silly mistakes in not indenting. Have not even read about exception yet. Does the question need me to implement the subclass, or I can simply use pass? Any hints on correcting my code to reflect what is asked. – chibole Feb 24 '16 at 12:35
  • Never mind. We are all students in almost everything ;) Updated answer to address the inheritance thing. – flaschbier Feb 24 '16 at 12:42
  • Thank you, changed code by removing the withdraw method in the superclass class and add a third option: if(amount > self.balance): print "invalid transaction." in the sub-class' withdraw method. All manual tests are going through, but not the unit text: – chibole Feb 24 '16 at 13:24
  • How do I put the balance variable into the minimum balance account constructor, then pass it into the superclass constructor? – chibole Feb 24 '16 at 13:31
  • updated the answer with some thoughts... – flaschbier Feb 24 '16 at 14:17

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