43

I have a 2D area with "dots" distributed on this area. I now am trying to detect "clusters" of dots, that is, areas with a certain high density of dots.

Any thoughts on (or links to articles with thoughts on) how to elegantly detect these areas?

closed as too broad by gnat, piet.t, Mark, grizzthedj, planetmaker Dec 18 '18 at 15:35

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • There's a great tutorial of clustering algorithms here, they discuss K-means and K-gaussians. – Mike Caron Dec 11 '08 at 15:19

16 Answers 16

24

How about defining an arbitrary resolution for your space, and calculate for each point in that matrix, a measure of the distance from that point to all dots, then you could make a "heat graph" and use a threshold to define the clusters.

It's a nice exercise for processing, maybe later I will post a solution.

EDIT:

Here it is:

//load the image
PImage sample;
sample = loadImage("test.png");
size(sample.width, sample.height);
image(sample, 0, 0);
int[][] heat = new int[width][height];

//parameters
int resolution = 5; //distance between points in the gridq
int distance = 8; //distance at wich two points are considered near
float threshold = 0.5;
int level = 240; //leven to detect the dots
int sensitivity = 1; //how much does each dot matters

//calculate the "heat" on each point of the grid
color black = color(0,0,0);
loadPixels();
for(int a=0; a<width; a+=resolution){
  for(int b=0; b<height; b+=resolution){
    for(int x=0; x<width; x++){
      for(int y=0; y<height; y++){
        color c = sample.pixels[y*sample.width+x];        
        /**
         * the heat should be a function of the brightness and the distance, 
         * but this works (tm)
         */
        if(brightness(c)<level && dist(x,y,a,b)<distance){
          heat[a][b] += sensitivity;
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

//render the output
for(int a=0; a<width; ++a){
  for(int b=0; b<height; ++b){
    pixels[b*sample.width+a] = color(heat[a][b],0,0);
  }
}
updatePixels();
filter(THRESHOLD,threshold);

EDIT 2 (slighly less inefficient code but same output):

//load the image
PImage sample;
sample = loadImage("test.png");
size(sample.width, sample.height);
image(sample, 0, 0);
int[][] heat = new int[width][height];
int dotQ = 0;
int[][] dots = new int[width*height][2];
int X = 0;
int Y = 1;


//parameters
int resolution = 1; //distance between points in the grid
int distance = 20; //distance at wich two points are considered near
float threshold = 0.6;
int level = 240; //minimum brightness to detect the dots
int sensitivity = 1; //how much does each dot matters

//detect all dots in the sample
loadPixels();
for(int x=0; x<width; x++){
 for(int y=0; y<height; y++){
   color c = pixels[y*sample.width+x];
   if(brightness(c)<level) {
       dots[dotQ][X] += x;
       dots[dotQ++][Y] += y;
   }
 }
}

//calculate heat
for(int x=0; x<width; x+=resolution){
 for(int y=0; y<height; y+=resolution){
   for(int d=0; d<dotQ; d++){
     if(dist(x,y,dots[d][X],dots[d][Y]) < distance)
       heat[x][y]+=sensitivity;
   }
 }
}

//render the output
for(int a=0; a<width; ++a){
 for(int b=0; b<height; ++b){
   pixels[b*sample.width+a] = color(heat[a][b],0,0);
 }
}
updatePixels();
filter(THRESHOLD,threshold);

/** This smooths the ouput with low resolutions
* for(int i=0; i<10; ++i) filter(DILATE);
* for(int i=0; i<3; ++i) filter(BLUR);
* filter(THRESHOLD);
*/

And the output with (a reduced) Kent sample:

  • 2
    Yikes, for a square of n x n points this is o(n^4), or for lower resolutions r, o(n^2*((n/r)^2)). Ok as a brute force method for small images maybe, but not good as a general solution. – SmacL Dec 10 '08 at 16:22
  • Of course I would't use this for anyting serious, just making a point, if the approach is useful, it can be optimized in many ways. – krusty.ar Dec 10 '08 at 16:27
  • Nice resulting product! – Kent Fredric Dec 10 '08 at 22:53
  • @kent: the interesting part would be to group dots accordint to the areas, this just makes more easy to see that there really are areas. @smacl: your comment made me feel bad so I updated it to be a little less ugly. – krusty.ar Dec 11 '08 at 11:24
  • @kent: I agree. Way cool image left over, but the process takes a while. – Mike Caron Dec 11 '08 at 14:55
23

I would suggest using a mean-shift kernel to find the density center of your dots.

Mean-shift illustration http://cvr.yorku.ca/members/gradstudents/kosta/compvis/file_mean_shift_path.gif

This figure shows a mean-shift kernel (centered initially on the edge of the cluster) converge towards the cluster's point of highest density.

In theory (in a nutshell):

Several answers to this questions already hinted at the mean-shift way of doing it:

What you see in the animated figure is a combination of these two suggestions: it uses a moving "block" (i.e. the kernel) to seek the locally highest density.

The mean-shift is an iterative method that uses a pixel neighborhood called the kernel (similar to this one) and uses it to compute the mean of the underlying image data. The mean in this context is the pixel-weighted average of the kernel coordinates.

In each iteration the kernel's mean defines its center coordinates for the next iteration - this is called the shift. Hence the name mean-shift. The stop condition for the iterations is when the shift distance drops to 0 (i.e. we are at the most dense spot in the neighborhood).

A comprehensive introduction to mean-shift (both in theory and application) can be found in this ppt presentation.

In practice:

An implementation of the mean-shift is available in OpenCV:

int cvMeanShift( const CvArr* prob_image, CvRect window,
                 CvTermCriteria criteria, CvConnectedComp* comp );

O'Reilly's Learning OpenCv (google book excerpts) also has a nice explanation on how it works. Basically just feed it your dots image (prob_image).

In practice, the trick is to choose the adequate kernel size. The smaller the kernel, the closer you need to initiate it to the cluster. The bigger the kernel, the more random your initial position can be. However, if there are several clusters of dots in your image, the kernel might converge right between them.

  • This sounds interesting, though (correct me if I'm wrong) this approach is not deterministic and therefore is not appropriate in some cases. Nice write-up. – Drew Noakes Jan 5 '09 at 19:00
  • 1
    Thanks. If deterministic means, that the algorithm always gives you the same output for a given input, then it is deterministic. – Ivan Jan 5 '09 at 21:45
  • Nice answer. But correct me if I'm wrong, this would only give you the "main cluster" in the OP case, where he needs to obtain different clusters. Wouldn't it? – Btc Sources May 14 '15 at 9:46
13

To add a bit of aide to Trebs statement, I think it important to realistically first define what the definition of a cluster is, sure, "dots closer together", thats rather vauge.

Take this sample set I generated, I know there's a cluster shape there, I created it.

However, programmatically identifying this "cluster" might be hard.

A human might deem that a large toroidal cluster, but your automated program is more likely going to decide it a series of smaller clusters in semi-close proximity.

Also, note that there are regions of super-high-density, which are in the context of the bigger picture, merely distractions

You'll need to consider this behaviour and possibly chain together clusters of similar density separated only by insignificant voids of lower density, depending on the specific application.

Whatever you develop, I would at least be interested in how it identifies the data in this set.

( I think looking into the technologies behind HDRI ToneMapping might be in order, because these work more-or-less on Light density, and there are "local" tonemaps and "global" tone maps, each yielding different results )

  • See my answer below on genetic algorithms. In this case, if you knew ahead of time that toroidal clusters (or any unusual shape) were possible, you could simply build that possibility into your solution-generating mechanism and your fitness function. – MusiGenesis Dec 10 '08 at 14:34
  • @Kent, if you use a TIN based solution, you can group triangles by order of magnitude of longest edge length to solve this. Thus while we see a torus, there could be many more other interesting shapes in your super dense area worthy of their own analysis. Google multi-resolution TIN or Voronoi. – SmacL Dec 10 '08 at 15:08
  • @smacl, pretty cool idea. – Mike Caron Dec 11 '08 at 15:02
12

Apply a blur filter to a copy of your 2D area. Something like

1 2 3 2 1
2 4 6 4 2
3 6 9 6 3
2 4 6 4 2
1 2 3 2 1

The "darker" areas now identify clusters of dots.

  • Interesting. Wondering whether this approach be extended into more than 2 dimensions... – Drew Noakes Jan 5 '09 at 18:43
  • Sure, but your matrix also grows exponentially. e.g. a 3D matrix would use 125 elements instead of 25. To achieve a similar effect as the above (let's call that M) would on 2D, you'd use M where z=0 and z=4, and M * 2 where z=1 and z=3, and M * 3 where z=2. Similarly with higher dimensions. – P Daddy Jan 5 '09 at 22:05
10

You could try creating a Quadtree representation of the data. The shorter paths in the graph would correspond to high density areas.

Or, to put it more clearly: given a Quadtree and level-order traversal, each lower-level node composed of "dots" would represent a high density area. As the level of the nodes increases, such nodes represent lower density areas of "dots"

  • I like this. I can think of some nifty algorithms for determining if other quad cells at the current level belong to the current "cluster", but unfortunately this comment field is too small... – Paul Tomblin Dec 10 '08 at 13:49
  • This is a really good idea so long as the clusters are convex. – Rich Dec 10 '08 at 22:42
  • Any links to Quadtree implementations? How fast would this be? – Mike Caron Dec 11 '08 at 14:56
5

How about a morphology approach?

Dilate the thresholded image by some number (depending on the target density of dots) then dots in a cluster will appear as a single object.

OpenCV supports morphological operations (as would a range of image processing libraries):

http://www.seas.upenn.edu/~bensapp/opencvdocs/ref/opencvref_cv.htm#cv_imgproc_morphology

4

This really sounds like an academic question.

The solution that comes to mind involves r* trees. This divides your total area in individually sized and possibly overlapping boxes. After doing this you can then determine if each box represents a 'cluster' or not for you by calculating the mean distance.

R* Trees

If that approach becomes difficult to implement you may be better off splitting your datagrid into equal-sized subdivisions and determining if a cluster occurs in each; you will have to be very mindful of edge conditions with this approach though. I would suggest that after the initial division you go through and recombine areas with datapoints within a certain threshold of the defined edge.

4
  1. Fit a probability density function to the data. I would use a "mixture of Gaussians" and fit it using Expectation Maximisation learning primed by the K-means algorithm. The K-means by itself can sometimes be sufficient without EM. The number of clusters itself would need to be primed with a model order selection algorithm.
  2. Then, each point can be scored with p(x) using the model. I.e. get the posterior probability that the point was generated by the model.
  3. Find the maximum p(x) to find the cluster centroids.

This can be coded very quickly in a tool like Matlab using a machine learning toolbox. MoG/EM learning/K-Means clustering are discussed widely on the web/standard texts. My favourite text is "Pattern classification" by Duda/Hart.

3

"Areas with a certain high density" implies that you know approximately how many dots per unit area you consider high. This leads me towards a grid approach, where you split your total area up into sub-areas of the appropriate size, then count the number of dots in each area. Once you find areas of your grid near your threshhold you can search neighboring areas of the grid too.

  • The advantage of the quadtree approach over this approach is that the quadtree doesn't have to define the unit area ahead of time, just the number of dots that you'd consider "a cluster". – Paul Tomblin Dec 10 '08 at 13:46
  • I like the Quadtree approach, I upvoted it, but the unit area is part of the problem. A cluster isn't just a number of dots, it's a number of dots close to each other, that is, within a certain area. – Bill the Lizard Dec 10 '08 at 13:49
3

Let me organize this as a research paper

a. Problem Statement

To quote Epaga : "I have a 2D area with "dots" distributed on this area. I now am trying to detect "clusters" of dots, that is, areas with a certain high density of dots."

Note that nowhere is it mentioned that the dots are from an image. (Though they could be ordered as one).

b.Method case 1: If the points are simply dots (dots = points in 2D space). In this scenario, you will already have both x & y locations for all points. The problem reduces to one of clustering the points. Ivan has done a great job of proposing a solution. He also summarized other answers of similar flavor. My 2cts in addition to his post is that you consider whether you know the number of clusters a-priori or not. Algorithms (supervised vs un-supervised clustering can be chosen accordingly).

case 2: If the points indeed originate from an image. Here the problem needs to be clarified. Let me explain using this image alt text If no distinction is made on the gray value of the dots, groups 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5 are all "distinct clusters". However if distinction is made on the basis of gray value, cluster 5 is tricky, as the dot have different gray values.

Regardless, this problem can be reduced to case 1 by raster-scanning the image and storing co-ordinates of non-zero (non white) pixels. Clustering algorithms, as proposed earlier, can then be employed to compute the number of clusters and cluster centers.

2

I think it depends on how much seperation there is between the dots and clusters. If the distances are large and irregular, I would initially triangulate the points, and then delete/hide all the triangles with statistically large edge lengths. The remaining sub-triangulations form clusters of arbitrary shape. Traversing the edges of these sub-triangulations yields polygons which can be used to determine which specific points lie in each cluster. The polygons can also be compared to know shapes, such as Kent Fredric's torus, as required.

IMO, grid methods are good for quick and dirty solutions, but get very hungry very quickly on sparse data. Quad trees are better, but TINs are my personal favourite for any more complex analysis.

  • Is "tringulate" a specialized term for a specific type of triangulation, or just a typo? – Paul Tomblin Dec 10 '08 at 15:34
0

I would calculate the distances from each point to all other points. Then sort the distances. Points that have a distance from each other that is below a threshold are considered Near. A group of points that is near to each other is a cluster.

The problem is that cluster may be clear to a human when he sees the graph, but does not have a clear mathematical definition. You need to define your near threshold, probably bu adjustuing it empirically until the result of your algorithm is (more or less) equal to what you perceive as being clustered.

  • That's n * (n + log(n))! – P Daddy Dec 10 '08 at 14:01
  • @P Daddy, if a faster algorithm is used but it doesn't return the right answers, its not what you want to use. Some problems are just NP complete. That's just how it is. – Kent Fredric Dec 10 '08 at 14:07
  • This is not one of them. – P Daddy Dec 10 '08 at 14:40
  • @P Daddy. Treb's idea can be done way quicker. Look up any computational geometry book (e.g. Shamos & Preparata, Hoey, or O'Rourke) on 'set of all nearest neighbours'. – SmacL Dec 10 '08 at 14:50
  • That was kind of my point. – P Daddy Dec 10 '08 at 14:57
0

You could overlay a logical grid over your plane. If a grid has a certain number of contained dots, it is considered "dense" and could then be thinned. This is done a lot in GIS applications when working with cluster tolerances. Using the grid helps compartmentalize your thinning algorithm.

0

You could use a genetic algorithm for this. If you define a "cluster" as, say, a rectangular sub-area with a high dot density, you could create an initial set of "solutions", each of which consists of some number of randomly-generated, non-overlapping rectangular clusters. You would then write a "fitness function" which evaluates each solution - in this case, you would want the fitness function to minimize the total number of clusters while maximizing the dot density within each cluster.

Your initial set of "solutions" will all be terrible, most likely, but some will likely be slightly less terrible than the others. You use the fitness function to eliminate the worst solutions, then create the next generation of solutions by cross-breeding the "winners" from the last generation. By repeating this process generation by generation, you should end up with one or more good solutions to this problem.

For a genetic algorithm to work, the different possible solutions to a problem space have to be incrementally different from each other in terms of how well they solve the problem. Dot clusters are perfect for this.

0

Cluster 3.0 includes a library of C methods for undertaking statistical clustering. It has a few different methods which may or may not solve your problem depedning on what form your dot clusters take. The library is available here here and is distributed under the Python license.

0

Have you tried simple, off-the-shelf solutions like ImagXpress from Accusoft Pegasus?

The BlobRemoval method can be tuned for pixel count and density to find hole punches, even if they are not continuous. (you can also try a Dilate function to close gaps)

With a little playing around you likely can get the results you need in the vast majority of cases, with very little code or science.

C#:
public void DocumentBlobRemoval( Rectangle Area, int MinPixelCount, int MaxPixelCount, short MinDensity )

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.