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I'm studying pointers and i'm trying to understand this code.

int main()
{
    int i=66 ;
    int *x;
    x=&i;
    f(&x);
    printf("%d",*x);

    return 0;

}
void f(int *x)
{
    int j=7;
    x=&j;
    printf("%d-",*x);

} 

I'm expectin as output : 7-7 , but i get 7-66. I suppose that when i write

x=&j;

in the function the original pointer now is setted to the direction of the j value and this is ok because the printf return 7- but why when i go back to the main the printf return 66? isn't the pointer now setted to the j value of the function ? i know the values in the function are lost when i close the function but why my pointer is still setted to the i value in the main after i run the function?

  • Is there a warning related to the fact that f() needs a pointer to an int and gets a pointer to a pointer to int ? – francis Feb 24 '16 at 17:38
  • The statement f(&x) takes the address of x which is already a pointer to an int. In f(int*), change x=&j to *x=j to get the value from your temporary variable. – callyalater Feb 24 '16 at 17:38
  • Even if f(x) is called, functions work on copies of arguments. Hence, the copy of x will be modified in f, but not x itself. *y can be modifed in function f(int* y)... – francis Feb 24 '16 at 17:40
  • 1
    And you shouldn't be trying to return pointers to local variables (even if you don't succeed ;) ) – tofro Feb 24 '16 at 17:41
6

In your function f(int* x), you are assigning the variable x to the address of your local, temporary variable j. What you really want to do is assign the value of what is pointed to by x to the value of j.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void f(int *x)
{
    int j=7;
    *x=j;
    printf("%d-",*x);

} 

int main()
{
    int i=66 ;
    int *x;
    x=&i;
    f(x);
    printf("%d",*x);

    return 0;

}

This can be run here.

A second issue is the fact that you take the address of your variable x in the main function and pass that as a parameter to f(int*) which becomes a pointer to a pointer to an int (an int** not an int*). Remember that x is already an int* and can be passed directly.

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