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I recently authored a 3rd party library for Java. Currently, I'm distributing the library via Github and a website I own where I make it possible to download the JAR file. I want to make it so developers can use Gradle and Maven (and possibly other build automation tools) to easily include my 3rd party library in their projects.

I'm new to Maven, Gradle, Bintray, JCenter, MavenCentral, Ivy, etc. However, I do have experience with Ant, Java, and Linux.

I've been trying to learn how to publish my 3rd party library using the tools/platforms above, but I've become confused.

  • Based on what I've read, Gradle, Maven, and Ant are competing technologies. So, why then, in the context of actual use-case scenarios, does Gradle seem to be so intertwined with Maven?
  • Bintray advertises itself as a software publishing and distribution platform. So, why was there a need to create JCenter as something distinct from the rest of Bintray? What can JCenter do that Bintray can't?
  • I've created a test package and version on Bintray and I uploaded a JAR file to the version. Is it possible to write a Gradle script that will be able to include that JAR file as a dependency in a Java project? Or does the package need to be "linked" with JCenter?

Basically, can anyone tell me what's going on with all of the above technologies? Don't feel obligated to provide answers to all of the sentences in this post that end in a question mark. Those questions are primarily intended to demonstrate my current level of understanding. A simple overview of how the technologies work together would be great, and if possible, an answer to the question in the title of this post.

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I will try answer to all the sentences ending with question marks :)

Based on what I've read, Gradle, Maven, and Ant are competing technologies. So, why then, in the context of actual use-case scenarios, does Gradle seem to be so intertwined with Maven?

Besides being a build tool and a dependency manager (in which Maven compete with Gradle), Maven introduced a standard artifact descriptor (the POM file), a standard project layout (src/main/java etc) and a standard artifact layout (groupId/version/artifactId-version.ext) that due to the popularity of Maven became a standard de-facto in the industry. They aren't particularly bad, so they stuck for now and Gradle works with them as well.

Also, Gradle appeared when Maven already been exceptionally popular. To overtake such a popular technology Gradle had to provide a clean and easy migration path, which means supporting Maven-structured projects, Maven-structured local caches, etc.

Bintray advertises itself as a software publishing and distribution platform. So, why was there a need to create JCenter as something distinct from the rest of Bintray? What can JCenter do that Bintray can't?

JCenter is not "something distinct" from Bintray. JCenter is a repository inside Bintray. This repository is special (we call this type of repository a "Central Repository"), since it is maintained by Bintray team themselves, and include (or link) the biggest collection of Java libraries in the world. For a lot of Java (or Android for that matter) developers, who don't intend to publish their work through Bintray and don't care about other people's personal repositories the only thing of interest on Bintray is JCenter. As such, people refer to JCenter as a thing of its own.

I've created a test package and version on Bintray and I uploaded a JAR file to the version. Is it possible to write a Gradle script that will be able to include that JAR file as a dependency in a Java project?

Absolutely. The "Set Me Up" button opens a window in which you'll find the instructions on how to add your personal repository in Gradle. Once done, the artifacts from your repository will be available for resolution in your Gradle project.

Or does the package need to be "linked" with JCenter?

The benefit of including your package in JCenter is that other developers who are familiar with JCenter as a source for 3rd party dependencies, but not familiar with your repository on Bintray will be able to find and use your library.

I hope it helped.


I am with JFrog, the company behind Bintray and [artifactory], see my profile for details and links.

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It is really hard (next to impossible) to give an answer, because you are asking multiple questions (I count 5 question marks), plus you want an explanation of how all of the mentioned technologies play together (or not). This really exceeds the scope and usefulness of stackexchange.

However, if it's maven you could live with, then what you probably want is:

1) deploy your artifact to maven central repo ==> see https://maven.apache.org/guides/mini/guide-central-repository-upload.html

2) deploy to some other well known public maven repo (like sonatype)

3) host your own public maven repo (that can be used by others) and upload there, still keep "advertising" through web and github pages

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    Since there are too many questions you decided to answer one that wasn't asked? :)
    – JBaruch
    Commented Feb 25, 2016 at 19:38
  • @JBaruch: I actually answered question 1: "How to publish a regular, non-Android Java library so that it becomes available for inclusion in Java projects via Maven & Gradle build scripts?" from the headline. However I forgot to count that question mark. Thank you for your helpful feedback! Commented Feb 25, 2016 at 21:36

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