With Entity Framework Core removing dbData.Database.SqlQuery<SomeModel> I can't find a solution to build a raw SQL Query for my full-text search query that will return the tables data and also the rank.

The only method I've seen to build a raw SQL query in Entity Framework Core is via dbData.Product.FromSql("SQL SCRIPT"); which isn't useful as I have no DbSet that will map the rank I return in the query.

Any Ideas???

  • 9
    I will greatly miss the SqlQuery<T> and don't want to have to map custom classes to my DbContext when I really just need a simple DTO for a specific use case. I have created a user voice to request adding this feature back in to EF Core that anyone can vote up if they would like this feature back: data.uservoice.com/forums/… – Matt Sanders Mar 28 '16 at 16:35
  • 1
    According to github.com/aspnet/EntityFramework/issues/1862, this is now targetted for EF core 1.2 and/or 1.1.0-preview1 – Dan Field Nov 17 '16 at 0:22
  • I answered below, now you can use Query type if you're using EF Core 2.1. – CodeNotFound May 21 at 15:55
up vote 18 down vote accepted

In EF Core you no longer can execute "free" raw sql. You are required to define a POCO class and a DbSet for that class. In your case you will need to define Rank:

var ranks = DbContext.Ranks
   .FromSql("SQL_SCRIPT OR STORED_PROCEDURE @p0,@p1,...etc", parameters)
   .AsNoTracking().ToList();

As it will be surely readonly it will be useful to include the .AsNoTracking() call.

  • 2
    So I guess I will also have to extend the DbContext to include a new property DbSet<Rank> Rank { get; set; }. What implications will this have now in reference to linq? I.e. Wont we now be able to use a statement like DBContext.Rank.Where(i => i.key == 1), and won't this statement have no implementation in SQL and therefore fail? – David Harlow Feb 25 '16 at 17:25
  • Linq emitted against this set have to be resolved in memory. If you need to emit different WHERE sql clause you have to include them as parameters or build a different script. – E-Bat Feb 25 '16 at 20:28
  • My DbSet does not have a "FromSql" method. Is this an extension I am missing? – birwin Feb 2 '17 at 19:00
  • 1
    @birwin, you need to import namespace Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore – E-Bat Feb 2 '17 at 20:30
  • @E-Bat Thank You. That did the trick! – birwin Feb 2 '17 at 23:47

You can execute raw sql in EF Core - Add this class to your project. This will allow you to execute raw SQL and get the raw results without having to define a POCO and a DBSet. See https://github.com/aspnet/EntityFramework/issues/1862#issuecomment-220787464 for original example.

using Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Infrastructure;
using Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Internal;
using Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Storage;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore
{
    public static class RDFacadeExtensions
    {
        public static RelationalDataReader ExecuteSqlQuery(this DatabaseFacade databaseFacade, string sql, params object[] parameters)
        {
            var concurrencyDetector = databaseFacade.GetService<IConcurrencyDetector>();

            using (concurrencyDetector.EnterCriticalSection())
            {
                var rawSqlCommand = databaseFacade
                    .GetService<IRawSqlCommandBuilder>()
                    .Build(sql, parameters);

                return rawSqlCommand
                    .RelationalCommand
                    .ExecuteReader(
                        databaseFacade.GetService<IRelationalConnection>(),
                        parameterValues: rawSqlCommand.ParameterValues);
            }
        }

        public static async Task<RelationalDataReader> ExecuteSqlQueryAsync(this DatabaseFacade databaseFacade, 
                                                             string sql, 
                                                             CancellationToken cancellationToken = default(CancellationToken),
                                                             params object[] parameters)
        {

            var concurrencyDetector = databaseFacade.GetService<IConcurrencyDetector>();

            using (concurrencyDetector.EnterCriticalSection())
            {
                var rawSqlCommand = databaseFacade
                    .GetService<IRawSqlCommandBuilder>()
                    .Build(sql, parameters);

                return await rawSqlCommand
                    .RelationalCommand
                    .ExecuteReaderAsync(
                        databaseFacade.GetService<IRelationalConnection>(),
                        parameterValues: rawSqlCommand.ParameterValues,
                        cancellationToken: cancellationToken);
            }
        }
    }
}

Here's an example of how to use it:

// Execute a query.
using(var dr = await db.Database.ExecuteSqlQueryAsync("SELECT ID, Credits, LoginDate FROM SamplePlayer WHERE " +
                                                          "Name IN ('Electro', 'Nitro')"))
{
    // Output rows.
    var reader = dr.DbDataReader;
    while (reader.Read())
    {
        Console.Write("{0}\t{1}\t{2} \n", reader[0], reader[1], reader[2]);
    }
}

Building on the other answers I've written this helper that accomplishes the task, including example usage:

public static class Helper
{
    public static List<T> RawSqlQuery<T>(string query, Func<DbDataReader, T> map)
    {
        using (var context = new DbContext())
        {
            using (var command = context.Database.GetDbConnection().CreateCommand())
            {
                command.CommandText = query;
                command.CommandType = CommandType.Text;

                context.Database.OpenConnection();

                using (var result = command.ExecuteReader())
                {
                    var entities = new List<T>();

                    while (result.Read())
                    {
                        entities.Add(map(result));
                    }

                    return entities;
                }
            }
        }
    }

Usage:

public class TopUser
{
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public int Count { get; set; }
}

var result = Helper.RawSqlQuery(
    "SELECT TOP 10 Name, COUNT(*) FROM Users U"
    + " INNER JOIN Signups S ON U.UserId = S.UserId"
    + " GROUP BY U.Name ORDER BY COUNT(*) DESC",
    x => new TopUser { Name = (string)x[0], Count = (int)x[1] });

result.ForEach(x => Console.WriteLine($"{x.Name,-25}{x.Count}"));

I plan to get rid of it as soon as built-in support is added. According to a statement by Arthur Vickers from the EF Core team it is a high priority for post 2.0. The issue is being tracked here.

If you're using EF Core 2.1 Release Candidate 1 available since 7 may 2018, you can take advantage of the proposed new feature which is Query type.

What is query type?

In addition to entity types, an EF Core model can contain query types, which can be used to carry out database queries against data that isn't mapped to entity types.

When to use query type?

Serving as the return type for ad hoc FromSql() queries.

Mapping to database views.

Mapping to tables that do not have a primary key defined.

Mapping to queries defined in the model.

So you no longer need to do all the hacks or workarounds proposed as answers to your question. Just follow these steps:

First you defined a new property of type DbQuery<T> where T is the type of the class that will carry the column values of your SQL query. So in your DbContext you'll have this:

public DbQuery<SomeModel> SomeModels { get; set; }

Secondly use FromSql method like you do with DbSet<T>:

var result = context.SomeModels.FromSql("SQL_SCRIPT").ToList();
  • 4
    This answer should be the best solution when using EF Core 2.1 and above. 👍 – Will Huang Aug 13 at 18:55

For now, until there is something new from EFCore I would used a command and map it manually

  using (var command = this.DbContext.Database.GetDbConnection().CreateCommand())
        {
            command.CommandText = "SELECT ... WHERE ...> @p1)";
            command.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
            var parameter = new SqlParameter("@p1",...);

            this.DbContext.Database.OpenConnection();

            using (var result = command.ExecuteReader())
            {
                while (result.Read())
                {
                   .... // Map to your entity
                }
            }
        }

Try to SqlParameter to avoid Sql Injection.

       dbData.Product.FromSql("SQL SCRIPT");

FromSql doesn't work with full query. Example if you want to include a WHERE clause it will be ignored.

Some Links:

Executing Raw SQL Queries using Entity Framework Core

Raw SQL Queries

In Core 2.1 you can do something like this:

protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
       modelBuilder.Query<Ranks>();
}

and then define you SQL Procedure, like:

public async Task<List<Ranks>> GetRanks(string value1, Nullable<decimal> value2)
{
    SqlParameter value1Input = new SqlParameter("@Param1", value1?? (object)DBNull.Value);
    SqlParameter value2Input = new SqlParameter("@Param2", value2?? (object)DBNull.Value);

    List<Ranks> getRanks = await this.Query<Ranks>().FromSql("STORED_PROCEDURE @Param1, @Param2", value1Input, value2Input).ToListAsync();

    return getRanks;
}

This way Ranks model will not be created in your DB.

Now in your controller/action you can call:

List<Ranks> gettingRanks = _DbContext.GetRanks(value1,value2).Result.ToListAsync();

This way you can call Raw SQL Procedures.

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