1

Is it possible to read this table to R

739132  tolerated(0.56) benign(0.302)
819973          unknown(0)
861275          benign(0.106)
861277  
861329  deleterious(0)  possibly_damaging(0.816)

The issue is that 1) not every line has same number of columns - there are empty columns and columsn which party shall be filled up with NA like this

739132  tolerated   0.56   benign   0.302 
819973  NA          NA     unknown       0
861275  NA          NA     benign   0.106
861277  NA          NA     NA        NA
861329  deleterious 0      possibly_damaging  0.816 

- with 5 columns - is that possible in R ? Otherwise is there a bash command or perl way to transform the table on the commadn line?

It could also be that that only the first column has a value - like deleterious (0) and then empty afterwards - read in should then just be as position deleterious 0 NA NA

  • 1
    Yes, it is possible with R. Use readLines to import the data and then use appropriate regexes to parse the lines. A sed/awk/perl solution might be faster. – Roland Feb 25 '16 at 16:13
  • @Roland - that sounds like a valid point. Could you outline a non R solution - even in R I have problems using the approp regex tbh – kutyw Feb 25 '16 at 16:16
  • What's the column seperator? Is it tab? – Sobrique Feb 25 '16 at 17:06
  • @Sobrique - yes it is – kutyw Feb 25 '16 at 17:22
  • @Matt Jacob - rather difficult - I read in with read lines than I used stsplit but I dont know how to impose ordering - coudl you help out? – kutyw Feb 25 '16 at 17:37
0

This is a little uglier than I'd like, but it works. For what it's worth this solution isn't sensitive to the spacing, number of tabs, etc. - it just pulls uses regular expressions to pull out the desired pieces.

Get raw data:

dd <- readLines(textConnection("739132  tolerated(0.56) benign(0.302)
819973          unknown(0)
861275          benign(0.106)
861277  
861329  deleterious(0)  possibly_damaging(0.816)"))

Could all be done in base R, but stringr has a few handy tools.

library(stringr)
words <- sapply(str_extract_all(dd,"[[:alpha:]]+\\("),
       str_replace,"\\(","")
nums <- str_extract_all(dd,"[0-9.]+")

Now pad with NA values appropriately

pad <- function(x) c(rep(NA,2-length(x)),x)
nums <- t(sapply(nums,
                 function(x) as.numeric(c(x[1],pad(x[-1])))))
words <- t(sapply(words,pad))

And put the pieces together

setNames(data.frame(nums[,1],words[,1],nums[,2],words[,2],nums[,3]),
         paste0("V",1:5))
  • How is it insensitive to spaces? If there is no requirement on spaces/tabs, with the typical line num field1 field2, how does it distginuish between num field1 and num field2? If there is just one field present how does it know which one it is? It must have some rule for what splits fields, I think. – zdim Feb 25 '16 at 20:10
  • it assumes there is some non-alphabetic/non-numeric character(s) separating the fields, but it never tries to "split fields". – Ben Bolker Feb 25 '16 at 21:58
  • Ah ... then there also has to be a fixed number of such char-sequence's on the line, and they cannot be or contain a tab, correct? That's nice to have in a library. – zdim Feb 25 '16 at 23:20
  • I didn't see your last clause before (the second column, rather than the first, might be missing). I could delete my answer, but I think I'll leave it for now unless you hate it. – Ben Bolker Feb 26 '16 at 2:35
  • Oh, no, don't delete because of my comment, please. I was commenting on the statement in the beginning. I don't know enough R to comment on the code. It does look interesting though. – zdim Feb 26 '16 at 3:00
0

This was what I came up with to do this. Assumes a bit that the 4th line has tabs with empty fields, rather than no fields. (Which I'm not sure of, because copy-paste)

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;

while ( <DATA> ) { 
    my @row = split /\t/; 
    for( @row ) { 
        #digit only
        /^\d+$/ && print; 
        #word with bracketed value
        /(\w+)\((.+)\)/ && print "$1\t$2"; 
        #empty field
        /^$/ && print "NA\tNA"; 
        #new delim
        print "\t";
    }
    print "\n";

}

__DATA__
739132  tolerated(0.56) benign(0.302)
819973      unknown(0)
861275      benign(0.106)
861277      
861329  deleterious(0)  possibly_damaging(0.816)

Prints:

739132  tolerated   0.56    benign  0.302   
819973  NA  NA  unknown 0   
861275  NA  NA  benign  0.106   
861277  NA  NA  NA  NA  
861329  deleterious 0   possibly_damaging   0.816   
  • Will this work for input: [num][TAB][field] ... ? So, the first field is there but the next one isn't. There isn't such a line in the sample input in the question but it is reasonable to expect. Then split won't catch that there is missing stuff after the first item since it stops (it won't return emtpy strings once there are only delimiters left). So there'll be nothing in @row and it won't print 'NA' x 2. I had the exact same thing and I had to fix it, please see "Expected input format" in my post. – zdim Feb 26 '16 at 19:12
0

This perl solution processes a tab separated file with any number of fields. At the beginning of the program, it gets the maximum number of tabs in any line, and multiplies it by 2 to get the prospective columns.

Update: Changed code to handle trailing null records.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use List::Util 'max';

open my $fh, '<', 'test.csv' or die $!;
chomp(my @data = <$fh>);
close $fh or die $!;

my $cols = 2 * max map tr/\t//, @data;

for (@data) {
    my ($key, @rest) = split /\t/;

    @rest = map {length() ? /(\w+)\((.+)\)/ : ('NA') x 2} @rest;

    push @rest, 'NA' while @rest < $cols;

    print join("\t", $key, @rest), "\n";
}

__DATA__
*** contents of test.csv (tab separated)

111111      
739132  tolerated(0.56) benign(0.302)
819973      unknown(0)
861275      benign(0.106)
861277      
861329  deleterious(0)  possibly_damaging(0.816)
871111  firstfield(9)

Output is

111111  NA      NA      NA      NA
739132  tolerated       0.56    benign  0.302
819973  NA      NA      unknown 0
861275  NA      NA      benign  0.106
861277  NA      NA      NA      NA
861329  deleterious     0       possibly_damaging       0.816
871111  firstfield      9       NA      NA
  • Nice. Just, you don't need to read the whole file, run map, and load a module to count tabs. Their number is fixed. Just get the first line: ($cols = split '\t', <$fh>) *= 2. This trickery is necessary because "2 x split" would use length of split's output to repeat 2 that many times, as a string (what I initially wrote here). Then still rewind etc. – zdim Feb 26 '16 at 4:21
  • @zdim This would work OK provided the first line wasn't an initial 'number' only with the empty tabs following it. If it was just the number only with no tabs, then it couldn't get the count needed. But then, there is no way of knowing what the case is for his file. I assumed that lines with just the leading number would have no trailing tabs and that's why I read the whole file. Also, I tried the ($cols = split '\t', <$fh>) *= 2 trick, but it gives the columns as 6, when the result I want is 4. split gives the no. of items from the split, not the tab cnt. like I have. (2 fields * 2 – Chris Charley Feb 26 '16 at 5:02
  • @zdim Just found a bug. If there is just 1 field, and no following tab, it doesn't correctly assign 2 trailing 'NA' s. Getting late. Will look at it tomorrow. – Chris Charley Feb 26 '16 at 5:26
  • Yes, you are right, need to adjust for cols = tabs + 1 (which is what I have done in my code -- forgot!). But then that's easy, no? As for empty lines, the deal is that every line must have equal number of tabs. You can still allow 'number-only' lines: if the count is 1, run it again and the file handle will pick up the next line, etc. You still end up reading only a few lines, no map, no modules. – zdim Feb 26 '16 at 6:09
  • As for the bug, if you want to keep the map maybe call a sub in its block which will process nicely. There are a few possiblities here, too much for a clean ?:. Even if you scoop them up somehow, what if there's another column added? – zdim Feb 26 '16 at 6:14

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