8

Consider the following code:

#include <iostream>

namespace ns1
{
    struct A
    {
    };

    template <class T>
    std::ostream& operator << (std::ostream& os, const T& t)
    {
        return os << "ns1::print" << std::endl;
    }
}

namespace ns2
{
    template <class T>
    std::ostream& operator << (std::ostream& os, const T& t)
    {
        return os << "ns2::print" << std::endl;
    }

    void f (const ns1::A& a)
    {
        std::cout << a;
    }
}


int main()
{
    ns1::A a;

    ns2::f (a);

    return 0;
}

Compilation fails with "ambiguous overload error" as per standard.

But why? Surely "equally good" operator in A's 'home' namespace should take precedence? Is there any logical reason not to do it?

  • 8
    Why do you think functions in A's "home" namespace should take precedence over functions in the namespace of the calling function f itself? There is no way around this being ambiguous. An error is the only sensible thing. – Cody Gray Feb 25 '16 at 17:29
  • Because whoever created than namespace knows better how A should be printed? – cppalex Feb 25 '16 at 17:30
  • 8
    First of all, they are templates. If the person who created A wanted to ensure a certain behavior for printing objects of type A, they would have provided either an overload or specialization. That would have resolved the ambiguity here. Second, namespaces can be opened and closed multiple times, so the function may not have even been provided by the implementor of A. – Cody Gray Feb 25 '16 at 17:31
10

If you want the overload in namespace A to be preferred than you'll have to add something to it to make it actually better. Say, by making it not a template:

namespace ns1 
{
    std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream&, const A& );
}

Otherwise, there's really no conceptual reason to see why a function template in one namespace would be preferred to a function template in another namespace if both are exactly equivalent. After all, why would the function template in A's namespace be "better" than the function template in f's namespace? Wouldn't the implementer of f "know better"? Relying solely upon function signature sidesteps this issue.

0

If you carefully read the compiler-errors, the ambiguity error is not between the operator<< versions in ns1 and ns2, but between the operator<<(os, const char*) instantiation from ns1 and the exact same overload from namespace std. The latter is being dragged in by ADL on std::ostream.

The best approach is to use the recommendation by @Barry, and de-templatize the operator<< in namespace ns1, but also to add all functionality related to ns1::A (such as f(A)) into the same namespace:

#include <iostream>

namespace ns1
{
    struct A {};

    std::ostream& operator << (std::ostream& os, const A& t)
    {
        return os << "ns1::print" << std::endl;
    }

    void f (const A& a)
    {
        std::cout << a;
    }    
}

int main()
{
    ns1::A a;
    f(a); // rely on ADL to find ns1::operator<<(os, A)
}

Live Example

Namespace ns1 then acts as the broader interface of class A through ADL.

  • 1
    Yes and no. If you SFINAE out the character strings, then cout << a would still be ambiguous between the two function templates – Barry Feb 25 '16 at 20:33
  • I'm tempted to simplify OP's example in this regard to change operator<<(std::ostream&, const T&) to be like g(const T&). – Barry Feb 25 '16 at 20:56
  • @Barry print() something would eliminate such surprises, yes – TemplateRex Feb 25 '16 at 21:51

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